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Discussion Starter #1
I changed the oil today.. brought a new oil drain bolt and copper washer from the stealer. It gripped well but when it was all the way in the bolt span around freely!?

Put the old one back in with some plumbers ptfe tape around the threads, i can still see oil building up around the bolt. Compared both bolts and could not see the difference.

There was oil building up around the bolt prior to me getting my hands on it!

Anyone got any ideas..? I'm thinking of change the pan at the bottom to sort it out if it doesnt cost to much!?
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIV / L405
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I had the same experience earlier this summer. I ended up having to take it to the dealer. I was concerned that the threads may have been stripped. It turned out to be a problem with the washer (threads were fine). Apparently changing the pan is a really big job. Dealer stated that this would be more than 2000 USD if this was needed.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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dsd1976 said:
IWithout the washer the bolt tightens up perfectly.
I suspect most of the thread in the sump has been stripped.

Until you can get it fixed, e.g., new sump or having it heli-coiled, leave the washer off and coat the bolt thread in Permatex No. 3 Aviation Gasket Sealer.

You do not want to have that bolt drop out.

Is it a body off job to replace the sump (like the RRS and Disco 3 and 4)?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've check on rave and been under the car again.. there are about 20 bolts to undo and the apparently it comes off..

i can't work out how the threads could be striped cos it grips well without copper washer 8~
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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dsd1976 said:
i can't work out how the threads could be striped cos it grips well without copper washer 8~
It could be gripping on the last thread in the hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
p38arover said:
dsd1976 said:
i can't work out how the threads could be striped cos it grips well without copper washer 8~
It could be gripping on the last thread in the hole.

You were right, took the lower pan off today took about 10 minutes to do. On the hole for the drain bolt i've got the very first thread and the last one. ordered a new one from the stealer here in Edmonton, worked out cheaper that atlantic british :) should hopefully be here tommorow!
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Excellent.

Imagine if the bolt had come out! :shock:

Doesn't bear thinking about.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Finally installed the new pan.. dealer did the part for $200 CDN in the end.. no more leak :)

NAPA autoparts did do a fix on the old pan for me but didnt want to take the risk on a long drive.

$400 dollars later for an Oil change /:(
 

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I had the same problem. The rr sump bolt is very short. If some one over tightens it the first few threads strip. Buy a bmw sump bolt they are much longer and will grab the remaining threads in the sump pan.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Tried a BMW bolt but they didnt have any of the bigger ones.. NAPA put in a longer bolt but it would have been a mission to get it out for the next oil change. Went for the new oil pan as have to do 1000km next week and didnt want to keep worry about the bolt rattling its way out.
 

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It's time to bring this thread back to life...

My vehicle has about 180,000 miles on it now, and not surprisingly, at some point during it's life, someone over-torqued the Oil Pan Drain Plug, so it's now leaking engine oil very gradually. I swapped out the plug / bolt for a new one, but this didn't help - The thread within the Oil Pan has definitely been slightly stripped.

Does anybody have any additional words of wisdom?

Probably the most 'sensible' thing to do is get a new oil pan + new gasket - I'm certainly not going to buy a used Pan, because there's a good chance that thread will also be damaged.

I've done a quick search, and it seems the cheapest I can get both a new pan and gasket is around $350.

I did a quick search for a BMW oil pan (M62 engine and X5 vehicle), but some pictures of the oil pan look to be a different shape - Am I wrong? Can I use a BMW Oil Pan? (Probably cheaper if the part is the same).

Other options -

1. I've thought about fitting a 'quick release' type of Drain Plug - I could probably glue this in, but it would be 'permanent'.

2. However, based on the cost of a new Pan and Gasket, I'm actually leaning towards getting a 'Top Sider' oil-changer, and gluing the current Drain Plug permanently in place -

http://www.amazon.com/America-5060-Topsider-Multi-Purpose-Removing/dp/B001445IZ8/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1388528012&sr=1-1&keywords=topsider+oil+changer

T
his would certainly be a lot cheaper than new pan, and I've been thinking about getting one of these 'Topsider' units for a while - Would make future fluid changes much easier on many vehicles. Anyone know if the Topsider tube is thin enough to stick into the Dipstick tube? I'm also not worried about having the Drain Plug permanently sealed - I'll be keeping the car pretty much forever. With this number of miles, and with the cosmetic damage I've done to it off-road, it probably isn't worth my time trying to sell or trade it. In other words, I'm very happy to keep it and use it for what they were built for.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions... Simon
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Have you looked into a heli-coil insert as someone suggested?

That would probably be the best, least-costly, most-reliable and easiest way to go.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Yeah then you need to take the old gasket off clean, sand the edge , line up the magnets in the new one and hope you have no leak on any of the 20 bolts, it's a heck of a job especially if you don't have a lift or pit.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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just helicoil it. why is everyone so afraid of helicoils??
helicoils are used to rethread spark plug threads...what worse/demanding environment
could you get?!? all this pan has to do is hold in an oil drain bolt....
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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It's time to bring this thread back to life...

2. However, based on the cost of a new Pan and Gasket, I'm actually leaning towards getting a 'Top Sider' oil-changer, and gluing the current Drain Plug permanently in place -

http://www.amazon.com/America-5060-Topsider-Multi-Purpose-Removing/dp/B001445IZ8/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1388528012&sr=1-1&keywords=topsider+oil+changer

T
his would certainly be a lot cheaper than new pan, and I've been thinking about getting one of these 'Topsider' units for a while - Would make future fluid changes much easier on many vehicles. Anyone know if the Topsider tube is thin enough to stick into the Dipstick tube? I'm also not worried about having the Drain Plug permanently sealed - I'll be keeping the car pretty much forever. With this number of miles, and with the cosmetic damage I've done to it off-road, it probably isn't worth my time trying to sell or trade it. In other words, I'm very happy to keep it and use it for what they were built for.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions... Simon
I faced a similar problem on an XJ40 Jag engine - a stripped oil drain plug thread in sump. I went the Helicoil route with the sump in situ but made a balls if it (here's the excuse!) because the drain hole is horizontal at the back of the sump on that engine and the proximity of the bell-housing made it difficult to get 'straight-on' access to keep the Helicoil tap 'square'. As a consequence, the drain plug would not seal properly and caused the occasional drip.

I invested in one of these - http://www.pelapumps.co.uk/default.aspx?a10page=pl6000 - and permanently installed the drain plug with JB Weld. Had to fill it twice of course because it only takes 6 litres at a time and it is quite a slow process unless the engine oil is hot.

Nevertheless, I never regretted getting the Pela, used it for years on all of my cars and I didn't need to get under the car to drain the oil. I no longer have the Pela because, being a decent bloke, I sold it with the Jag so that the new owner wouldn't have any shocks when he did his first oil change! :)
 

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Thanks everybody for your intelligent advice.

I'm actually going to go with Bryan's suggestion, and have just purchased one of these from Amazon -

http://www.amazon.com/Hydro-Turf-Oil-Extractor-OIL01/dp/B000GU0MMU/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

W
hy? I understand that a Heli-Coil fix is a 'better' option in many ways, however I don't have a thread Kit, and so for a similar price, and for less repair-time, I have a fix that essentially includes the Oil Extractor pump for 'free', and can use it far more often than I would use a Heli-Coil Kit.

Quick Question - Bryan mentions JB Weld to permanently 'glue' the Oil Drain Bolt into the Oil Pan - Any tips? Obviously I need to completely drain the oil and completely clean oil from the Oil Pan Plug and Oil Pan. Handy hints? I'm assuming I should put the bolt back without the washer?

I live in Southern Wisconsin, where we can get cold temperatures - It's about 3 degrees F outside this morning, and 'feels like' minus 16 F, with windchill.

Therefore, if I use JB weld I need to be sure that it can withstand a temperature range of hot oil to 'very' cold weather.

Thanks Everybody, and here's wishing that 2014 doesn't involve too many unexpected Range Rover repair bills.
 

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I'm personally not a big fan of sucking oil from the pan when it is not designed for that.

Yes, the best repair would be either replacement of the lower pan, or a helicoil in the current pan, but as stated earlier in this thread, a longer bolt will usually do the job.

They usually strip from the previous oil change, but seal up then from the crush washer's tension, you can feel it when you remove the plug, and it's too late at that point. My shop keeps the BMW bolt (for the 3.0l X5) in stock for this very reason. It is longer and will grab the threads that are still good, and seal up without issue.

The BMW P/N is 11 13 1 273 093

This still has a 17mm head, and uses the same crush washer as factory, so what comes with the filter will still work fine.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Simon, appologies, I gave you duff gen.

The stuff I used to seal the drain plug was Araldite epoxy putty, not JB Weld.
The Araldite putty is good down to -40 degrees C and up to +120 degrees C.

I made sure that the sump was drained and repeatedly stuffed strips of rag in to the hole to soak up any oil residue before blasting the hole and surroundings with brake cleaner. I then moulded the putty in to a 'donut' washer under the bolt head before screwing it in. Don't forget though that I had some threads to hold the bolt in place while the putty hardened and cured (about 60 minute's), you may have to smear some putty on the bolt threads.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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x2 on trying a longer bolt first. I had the exact same problem the last time I changed my oil. I went and got a new bolt (M12 x 1.5 if I remember correctly) from the hardware store, and cut it to be about 1/2" longer than the original.
 
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