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I Have fallen out of love. Starting to really think the l322s are absolute junk. Defending them I’m starting to feel like trump saying the China flu isn’t real. They may look great, but I don’t believe the L322 to be a british car, in fact I’m pretty sure it’s. So much so if it were British than hitler crossed the channel and won the war. I honestly have yet to find a British part on and early l322 besides maybe a body panel or glass.

Across the whole l322 range the drivetrains are made of glass. 5hp or 6hp are both horribly engineered for the vehicle. The outdated 5hp should have never been fitted as it was obsolete in 2001 and had issues wearing out in 2wd sedans. I had a 740i so I’m not talking without experience. Same goes with the m62. Weak power plant with brittle timingchain guides and crappy Vanos. The lump leaks from every conceivable crevice whether it’s oil or coolant. Cooling system is bmw plastic crap with junk connectors that fail way before the hoses themselves. Bmw tried to reinvent the hose clamp and failed.

Jag powered l322s are better but only worth it if supercharged. They still ride on a crappy bmw suspension design that’s nothing more than beefed bmw sedan from the 90’s. Squeaky rear bushes so hard to change you stop caring and front control arm bushes where replacement becomes seasonal maintenance. Not to mention the swaybar end links that regardless of brand might as well be single use for anything more than the parking lot. Oh and 6hp... junk like 5hp but mechatronic like a mechanical electrical problem just waiting under your monocoque. 2010 and up... timing chain guides worth more than the truck. Truck that.

I found out our transfer cases, which fingers crossed doesn’t have a stuck selector motor, will send all power to one corner in the case of a broken cv joint. There is no attempt to protect the cv joints on the front axels so there was no attempt to make this platform an off-roader. The rear locking diff is a total joke that will brick your whole car if it gets stuck and brick it again if it’s replaced and not reprogrammed by a dealer.

Now we have mention the atrocity known as special programs. The stupid wheel on 2007onwards that doesn’t nothing more than automate simple off road functions. It’s the off-road equivalent of a sport button so the middle aged business man can feel confident if he/she sees a cactus or snowflake in the wild. The stupid system has no failsafe and a simple fault will cascade into total failure of the vehicle. This leaves the l322 with a trans fault limited gears and lowers the air suspension. After kindly lowering your air suspension it locks its position. Its such a bad design that I don’t even think it’s safe. This condition can be triggered by a spilled coffee which the lawyer driving there new l322 right before the economic collapse of 2008 would have likely have done.

You can’t buy windshield wipers. Nothing more to say.

Besides the fact the seats are just not comfortable no matter how many time you tell yourself they are... comes the l322s biggest problem. They are all beginning to rust. I’m from the Northeast and I’m seeing rust in the same places on all l322s. Upper tailgate rear wheel arches and the front and rear subframes. It’s universal and washing them doesn’t help it’s just where water collects on the ones I’ve owned and driven. Cocked up the first monocoque I guess. I hate when I open the rear doors and my feet get wet. Or I open the rear doors and the door seal rips off because the water that was trapped froze.

I want to love the l322 and have given it almost 4 years to win me over... but they just suck. This car was built for rodeo drive and hauling kardshians. This kind of branding was intentional and the l322 sold in numbers to a wealthy demographic of less interesting people, so they could feel special and famous. L322 makes the p38 look like a good car and that’s sad. Range rovers are mass market now I wouldn’t even bother trying any of their newer models. What a let down.
 

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You've obviously put in a lot of work.
You gunna sell?
Everything you've mentioned is stuff I would have never even conceived of knowing about before I got the L322. It's sort of cool to be in a club where I do now.
I don't disagree with any of your points, and I look forward to getting a P38 just to continue the tradition of agony 😂

Hope you're well!
 

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Yep - they require a LOT of maintenance and clearly some cost cutting decisions as well. I have an 07 with the non-supercharged Jag engine. Its a FL car so no rust but I hear you. Quality wise I had a 2011 X5 and EVERYTHING in that car broke (the plastic approach to everything is horrible - the V8 sucked). That being said I do appreciate your help with my speakers.
 

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I Have fallen out of love. Starting to really think the l322s are absolute junk. Defending them I’m starting to feel like trump saying the China flu isn’t real. They may look great, but I don’t believe the L322 to be a british car, in fact I’m pretty sure it’s. So much so if it were British than hitler crossed the channel and won the war. I honestly have yet to find a British part on and early l322 besides maybe a body panel or glass.

Across the whole l322 range the drivetrains are made of glass. 5hp or 6hp are both horribly engineered for the vehicle. The outdated 5hp should have never been fitted as it was obsolete in 2001 and had issues wearing out in 2wd sedans. I had a 740i so I’m not talking without experience. Same goes with the m62. Weak power plant with brittle timingchain guides and crappy Vanos. The lump leaks from every conceivable crevice whether it’s oil or coolant. Cooling system is bmw plastic crap with junk connectors that fail way before the hoses themselves. Bmw tried to reinvent the hose clamp and failed.

Jag powered l322s are better but only worth it if supercharged. They still ride on a crappy bmw suspension design that’s nothing more than beefed bmw sedan from the 90’s. Squeaky rear bushes so hard to change you stop caring and front control arm bushes where replacement becomes seasonal maintenance. Not to mention the swaybar end links that regardless of brand might as well be single use for anything more than the parking lot. Oh and 6hp... junk like 5hp but mechatronic like a mechanical electrical problem just waiting under your monocoque. 2010 and up... timing chain guides worth more than the truck. Truck that.

I found out our transfer cases, which fingers crossed doesn’t have a stuck selector motor, will send all power to one corner in the case of a broken cv joint. There is no attempt to protect the cv joints on the front axels so there was no attempt to make this platform an off-roader. The rear locking diff is a total joke that will brick your whole car if it gets stuck and brick it again if it’s replaced and not reprogrammed by a dealer.

Now we have mention the atrocity known as special programs. The stupid wheel on 2007onwards that doesn’t nothing more than automate simple off road functions. It’s the off-road equivalent of a sport button so the middle aged business man can feel confident if he/she sees a cactus or snowflake in the wild. The stupid system has no failsafe and a simple fault will cascade into total failure of the vehicle. This leaves the l322 with a trans fault limited gears and lowers the air suspension. After kindly lowering your air suspension it locks its position. Its such a bad design that I don’t even think it’s safe. This condition can be triggered by a spilled coffee which the lawyer driving there new l322 right before the economic collapse of 2008 would have likely have done.

You can’t buy windshield wipers. Nothing more to say.

Besides the fact the seats are just not comfortable no matter how many time you tell yourself they are... comes the l322s biggest problem. They are all beginning to rust. I’m from the Northeast and I’m seeing rust in the same places on all l322s. Upper tailgate rear wheel arches and the front and rear subframes. It’s universal and washing them doesn’t help it’s just where water collects on the ones I’ve owned and driven. Cocked up the first monocoque I guess. I hate when I open the rear doors and my feet get wet. Or I open the rear doors and the door seal rips off because the water that was trapped froze.

I want to love the l322 and have given it almost 4 years to win me over... but they just suck. This car was built for rodeo drive and hauling kardshians. This kind of branding was intentional and the l322 sold in numbers to a wealthy demographic of less interesting people, so they could feel special and famous. L322 makes the p38 look like a good car and that’s sad. Range rovers are mass market now I wouldn’t even bother trying any of their newer models. What a let down.
2012 L322 S/C

I had always likened driving one to driving a faberge egg. Look at it wrong and it throws a suspension fault. Maintenance has been RELIGIOUS and I have spent close to $15k on break-fixes this piece since buying in April 2019, just to keep it on the road. That’s what the Rover cost. It has never left the pavement and never been raced. It makes my Dodges and Jeep look reliable.

This hunk of junk has cost more in 1 year than my other 4 have cost me over 10. Read that again.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've never once crossed Manhattan without the transmission entering limp mode. Replaced everything but the box itself. 15k repairs on a max 20k truck is just crazy. P38s were bad with BeCM issues but way more robust and much cheaper to maintain than the l322 and now that they have aged I think they are more unique than the l322.

last night decided to take the mountain drive home and the CV let go. I had to keep momentum and make it down a mountain with no drive before deciding to leave it on the side of the road. For the off road excellence the brand touts the center diff should be smart enough to recognize 100% torque was going nowhere lock the center diff and make it home. It instead entered transfault program, check engine came on and flashing low range icon. What a joke TC should have locked and at least given torque to the remaining axle.
 

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I've never once crossed Manhattan without the transmission entering limp mode. Replaced everything but the box itself. 15k repairs on a max 20k truck is just crazy. P38s were bad with BeCM issues but way more robust and much cheaper to maintain than the l322 and now that they have aged I think they are more unique than the l322.

last night decided to take the mountain drive home and the CV let go. I had to keep momentum and make it down a mountain with no drive before deciding to leave it on the side of the road. For the off road excellence the brand touts the center diff should be smart enough to recognize 100% torque was going nowhere lock the center diff and make it home. It instead entered transfault program, check engine came on and flashing low range icon. What a joke TC should have locked and at least given torque to the remaining axle.
Yep I think not all have lockers (only with skid plate package I think) and with a broken CV any amount of brake vectoring wouldn’t matter because the CV is just rotating freely disconnected from the wheel.

One of the worst ways in which a 4WD can fail (traction control useless, and no lockers) these vehicles are 100% marketing because you break down before you get to the mountains.


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Discussion Starter #7
Yep I think not all have lockers (only with skid plate package I think) and with a broken CV any amount of brake vectoring wouldn’t matter because the CV is just rotating freely disconnected from the wheel.

One of the worst ways in which a 4WD can fail (traction control useless, and no lockers) these vehicles are 100% marketing because you break down before you get to the mountains.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
P38 at least could limp home in the same scenario I had a front driveshaft let go and the VC split the torque the the rear to once the shaft was out. I’m sure it would have done the same if a cv snapped.
 

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I Have fallen out of love. Starting to really think the l322s are absolute junk. Defending them I’m starting to feel like trump saying the China flu isn’t real. They may look great, but I don’t believe the L322 to be a british car, in fact I’m pretty sure it’s. So much so if it were British than hitler crossed the channel and won the war. I honestly have yet to find a British part on and early l322 besides maybe a body panel or glass.

Across the whole l322 range the drivetrains are made of glass. 5hp or 6hp are both horribly engineered for the vehicle. The outdated 5hp should have never been fitted as it was obsolete in 2001 and had issues wearing out in 2wd sedans. I had a 740i so I’m not talking without experience. Same goes with the m62. Weak power plant with brittle timingchain guides and crappy Vanos. The lump leaks from every conceivable crevice whether it’s oil or coolant. Cooling system is bmw plastic crap with junk connectors that fail way before the hoses themselves. Bmw tried to reinvent the hose clamp and failed.

Jag powered l322s are better but only worth it if supercharged. They still ride on a crappy bmw suspension design that’s nothing more than beefed bmw sedan from the 90’s. Squeaky rear bushes so hard to change you stop caring and front control arm bushes where replacement becomes seasonal maintenance. Not to mention the swaybar end links that regardless of brand might as well be single use for anything more than the parking lot. Oh and 6hp... junk like 5hp but mechatronic like a mechanical electrical problem just waiting under your monocoque. 2010 and up... timing chain guides worth more than the truck. Truck that.

I found out our transfer cases, which fingers crossed doesn’t have a stuck selector motor, will send all power to one corner in the case of a broken cv joint. There is no attempt to protect the cv joints on the front axels so there was no attempt to make this platform an off-roader. The rear locking diff is a total joke that will brick your whole car if it gets stuck and brick it again if it’s replaced and not reprogrammed by a dealer.

Now we have mention the atrocity known as special programs. The stupid wheel on 2007onwards that doesn’t nothing more than automate simple off road functions. It’s the off-road equivalent of a sport button so the middle aged business man can feel confident if he/she sees a cactus or snowflake in the wild. The stupid system has no failsafe and a simple fault will cascade into total failure of the vehicle. This leaves the l322 with a trans fault limited gears and lowers the air suspension. After kindly lowering your air suspension it locks its position. Its such a bad design that I don’t even think it’s safe. This condition can be triggered by a spilled coffee which the lawyer driving there new l322 right before the economic collapse of 2008 would have likely have done.

You can’t buy windshield wipers. Nothing more to say.

Besides the fact the seats are just not comfortable no matter how many time you tell yourself they are... comes the l322s biggest problem. They are all beginning to rust. I’m from the Northeast and I’m seeing rust in the same places on all l322s. Upper tailgate rear wheel arches and the front and rear subframes. It’s universal and washing them doesn’t help it’s just where water collects on the ones I’ve owned and driven. Cocked up the first monocoque I guess. I hate when I open the rear doors and my feet get wet. Or I open the rear doors and the door seal rips off because the water that was trapped froze.

I want to love the l322 and have given it almost 4 years to win me over... but they just suck. This car was built for rodeo drive and hauling kardshians. This kind of branding was intentional and the l322 sold in numbers to a wealthy demographic of less interesting people, so they could feel special and famous. L322 makes the p38 look like a good car and that’s sad. Range rovers are mass market now I wouldn’t even bother trying any of their newer models. What a let down.
Lol! This was entertaining and true. I had to remove the factory wiper figment so that I could avoid those metal wiper blades they sell, each time I go into an autozone I encounter such beautiful cheap rubber wipers that make me wonder why I spend $130 every year on crappy wipers when the rainex ones in there go for $30.. so I changed the figment to adapt to the rainex ones that fit a KIA. I’m Very happy and I don’t have to listen to screeches on my windshield anymore. Fortunately my l322 has been awesome and is outliving its expiry date so far.
 

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So your CV just randomly snapped with no warning? Never really heard of that on any car, usually you have to neglect all kinds or weird clicks and never inspect the boots. In fact, I don't think I've seen a CV fail from anything but lack of lubrication. I've had ZF trans on 4 cars now, 3 of the 4 were Range Rovers, 2x 4hp22, an 5hp24, and now 6hp on my 2012. None of them failed or even had issues. And I feel like each one was a great transmission for the year designed. What do you think they should have used? And what BMW sedan has the prototype suspension design for the L322? That's funny. But I guess never having a single BECM issue over two P38's and hundreds of thousands of miles must mean I'm a lucky guy.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
L322 front end is almost exactly the same as e38 or e39. Zf 5hp slip and shudder on torque converter lockup in all my bmws and this l322. 6hp I have a biased grudge against the mechatronic tcm going bad and the stupid sleeve that dumps all your expensive fluid out before destroying the clutch’s. Only indication of the problem if you have a dirt driveway and can’t see the huge stain, is the shifts start to feel like ass. 4hps were fine on the p38 never once had a problem.

The cv failed in low range under engine braking. A piece of ice must have cut the boot.

Ive wanted an l322 since 2002 I’ve owned two since 2016, and both have sucked. Too much maintenance not enough enjoyment.

The roads last night were bad but not more than what this thing was designed to handle.
290242
 

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I Have fallen out of love. Starting to really think the l322s are absolute junk. Defending them I’m starting to feel like trump saying the China flu isn’t real. They may look great, but I don’t believe the L322 to be a british car, in fact I’m pretty sure it’s. So much so if it were British than hitler crossed the channel and won the war. I honestly have yet to find a British part on and early l322 besides maybe a body panel or glass.

Across the whole l322 range the drivetrains are made of glass. 5hp or 6hp are both horribly engineered for the vehicle. The outdated 5hp should have never been fitted as it was obsolete in 2001 and had issues wearing out in 2wd sedans. I had a 740i so I’m not talking without experience. Same goes with the m62. Weak power plant with brittle timingchain guides and crappy Vanos. The lump leaks from every conceivable crevice whether it’s oil or coolant. Cooling system is bmw plastic crap with junk connectors that fail way before the hoses themselves. Bmw tried to reinvent the hose clamp and failed.

Jag powered l322s are better but only worth it if supercharged. They still ride on a crappy bmw suspension design that’s nothing more than beefed bmw sedan from the 90’s. Squeaky rear bushes so hard to change you stop caring and front control arm bushes where replacement becomes seasonal maintenance. Not to mention the swaybar end links that regardless of brand might as well be single use for anything more than the parking lot. Oh and 6hp... junk like 5hp but mechatronic like a mechanical electrical problem just waiting under your monocoque. 2010 and up... timing chain guides worth more than the truck. Truck that.

I found out our transfer cases, which fingers crossed doesn’t have a stuck selector motor, will send all power to one corner in the case of a broken cv joint. There is no attempt to protect the cv joints on the front axels so there was no attempt to make this platform an off-roader. The rear locking diff is a total joke that will brick your whole car if it gets stuck and brick it again if it’s replaced and not reprogrammed by a dealer.

Now we have mention the atrocity known as special programs. The stupid wheel on 2007onwards that doesn’t nothing more than automate simple off road functions. It’s the off-road equivalent of a sport button so the middle aged business man can feel confident if he/she sees a cactus or snowflake in the wild. The stupid system has no failsafe and a simple fault will cascade into total failure of the vehicle. This leaves the l322 with a trans fault limited gears and lowers the air suspension. After kindly lowering your air suspension it locks its position. Its such a bad design that I don’t even think it’s safe. This condition can be triggered by a spilled coffee which the lawyer driving there new l322 right before the economic collapse of 2008 would have likely have done.

You can’t buy windshield wipers. Nothing more to say.

Besides the fact the seats are just not comfortable no matter how many time you tell yourself they are... comes the l322s biggest problem. They are all beginning to rust. I’m from the Northeast and I’m seeing rust in the same places on all l322s. Upper tailgate rear wheel arches and the front and rear subframes. It’s universal and washing them doesn’t help it’s just where water collects on the ones I’ve owned and driven. Cocked up the first monocoque I guess. I hate when I open the rear doors and my feet get wet. Or I open the rear doors and the door seal rips off because the water that was trapped froze.

I want to love the l322 and have given it almost 4 years to win me over... but they just suck. This car was built for rodeo drive and hauling kardshians. This kind of branding was intentional and the l322 sold in numbers to a wealthy demographic of less interesting people, so they could feel special and famous. L322 makes the p38 look like a good car and that’s sad. Range rovers are mass market now I wouldn’t even bother trying any of their newer models. What a let down.
So other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how was the rest of the play?
 

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P38 at least could limp home in the same scenario I had a front driveshaft let go and the VC split the torque the the rear to once the shaft was out. I’m sure it would have done the same if a cv snapped.
That’s why I am a fan of the hard split 50/50 or something close to that. Sometimes the “up to 100% to the wheel with traction” systems can work against you if the wrong part breaks.


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I Have fallen out of love. Starting to really think the l322s are absolute junk. Defending them I’m starting to feel like trump saying the China flu isn’t real. They may look great, but I don’t believe the L322 to be a british car, in fact I’m pretty sure it’s. So much so if it were British than hitler crossed the channel and won the war. I honestly have yet to find a British part on and early l322 besides maybe a body panel or glass.
Blah blah blah here we go again. What a load of clap trap. But do carry on. This kind of ranting shows just how little you know about these cars.

Your name isn't EEHam by any chance?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Blah blah blah here we go again. What a load of clap trap. But do carry on. This kind of ranting shows just how little you know about these cars.

Your name isn't EEHam by any chance?
I know these cars really well, and know the l322 is the evolution towards crap. I was blown away there was no center diff lock. I’ve owned gen 1,2 and 3 ffrr and these things are just not aging well. Brakes tires and suspension have no longevity to them. Transmission fail at alarming rates, just look at how many transmission related threads there are. M62 was tired in 2001 weak and frail. The 5.0 is plummeting in value because of timing issues. I know these cars and am sick of fixing them more than driving them. The short lived suspension bushings really piss me off. That’s hallmark of bmw quality.
 

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I know these cars really well, (I beg to differ)

and know the l322 is the evolution towards crap. I was blown away there was no center diff lock. (90% of this class of car dont have centre diff locks. The Range Rover is not designed as a hard core off roader like a Defender as an example. How long into your ownership did you discover this?)

I’ve owned gen 1,2 and 3 ffrr and these things are just not aging well. (I think they age very well. I do agree that they dont hold their value well but how can one be surprised when they are maintained by those who have very little knowledge and understanding of them. So many of the posts on this forum are proof of this).

Brakes tires and suspension have no longevity to them. (The car weighs nearly 3 tons and you complain about brakes and tires. C'mon. Lets try to be a bit more sensible here).

Transmission fail at alarming rates, (no they dont)

just look at how many transmission related threads there are. (Yes you can blame Land Rover for their daft service intervals on transmissions but that applies to so many manufacturers these days. They are all driven by the "bottom line". But as fars as being bad transmissions, the reverse is true. They are very reliable if looked after correctly - being looked after correctly does not mean having a stamp in the service book - and they have a very good life span).

M62 was tired in 2001 weak and frail. (the M62 is built like a tank engine and is super reliable. And I will say it again - if it is cared for correctly).

The 5.0 is plummeting in value because of timing issues. (I agree on this point. But as new procedures become available either from the manufacturer or from those willing to experiment, changing the timing chain tensioners has become a relatively simple and inexpensive job. This applies to all engines).

I know these cars and am sick of fixing them more than driving them. The short lived suspension bushings really piss me off. That’s hallmark of bmw quality. (this short lived suspension bushing problem is not a problem. Its by design. If you want a car that rides like a Range Rover, you need suspension components that are very pliable and sacrificial. You can fit cheap and nasty poly bushes but then you suffer the result. If you want a car that rides like a Toyota, go and buy a Toyota. You cant buy a Range Rover and expect it to be a Toyota).

I could write a book on incompetent garages/mechanics but I will relate one recent example. 2 days ago someone came to me pleading for help with problems on his 2003 car. Too many problems to list here but I have to mention the suspension. It handled like a pig and had a bad front end knock. It took 10 seconds to diagnose and one hour to fix. Pity I didnt take photos. A local Land Rover "specialist" had worked on the car a few months ago. They fitted one solid rubber bush to the right hand upper control arm (the rear most control arm on the front suspension for those that dont know) and did nothing with the left. They left the original in place. Can you believe it? And the guy was complaining in a similar fashion to many who complain on this and other forums. "He will never own another Land Rover and so on"

Give me a break. I see this type of thing on a daily basis and it can be a little frustrating to put it mildly.
 

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To give me a perspective, let me know if if my understanding isn't correct:
You bought a 2004 in 2017, then after you (unfortunately) totaled that, you bought a 2007 in 2019.
So you began with a 13-year-old RR of the first (and worst) outing of the L322 (albeit prettied-up for sale), and a 12-year-old RR (albeit prettied-up for sale); both of which of course would have many parts worn-out and would be expected to need a good bit of refreshing to be "comfortably" reliable.

Those are the two (or did a 2009 get bought in there somewhere recently too?) that are the experience you're describing?
I've had many (relative to any other make/model) problems with my RR's (a 2003 bought in 2008 & 2012 bought in 2019), which to most European vehicle owners would consider normal, but it's an understanding that an owner of any Land Rover (especially beyond warranty age) must know.

Have you considered (as suggested above) a Toyota? Great vehicles for the driver that is looking for reliability above all.

You may be showing your age (as am I), where when I was younger (maybe mid-20's), a 5-year old vehicle seemed old & worn-out to me, although I couldn't afford anything that new anyway when I began the path of auto-ownership (up until mid-20's of getting more financially stable).
But as I have so many more years behind me, now I consider an 8-year-old vehicle (my 2012) as a fine(r), new(er) and comfortable piece of automotive equipment; keeping in mind that when I bought it, I expected to need to put about $6k- $7k into it immediately for timing chain guides & other wear-out items. Of course I didn't expect to need to completely rebuild the transmission & transfer case, but Hey! It's a Land Rover, not a Ford!
If I wanted reliable, I would have bought a nice, new Ford Explorer! My 1992 Explorer Sport is still going strong, and in the 28 years I've had it, I've only had to replace a starter & the A/C compressor (and associated bits that go with a compressor).
Yesterday I took my 1992 Explorer for a nice spin.
My 2003 RR? I need to order a water pump to replace the one that failed last week (I replaced that one back in 2012), so it's not up to a spin until I do.
Or maybe the new Bronco's they're putting out soon.
 

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The L322 is a great looking SUV and probably the best riding SUV of its generation. Overall fit and finish is outstanding both interior and exterior.

A cheap SUV to purchase, own and operate - it is not.

Looking at the main components of the car: Engine, transmission, drive train, suspension, brakes, interior and exterior relative to other cars shows it is about the same as all others.

Engine has issues similar to most all other cars of the era and even today. Honda, VW, BMW, Audi, Porsche, GM ... Plastic guide rails have been a disaster. Tensioner issues follow similar failure problems as other cars.

Suspension issues are not an issue. Failed bags is typical of cars that use bags. The rest of the parts seem to be pretty robust.

Transmission - the ZF transmission is not bad. It appears there were some that the assembly was sub-par with gap play being too large (resulting in failure). Do some reading and you will see every transmission has issues.

Drivetrain and brakes - other than the original design issue with the short front driveshaft that was corrected, these two items are rather robust.

The interior and exterior hold up rather well.

If one wants a reliable vehicle that is cheap to maintain buy a bread and butter car from a major manufacturer on the last year of its product cycle.

I don't dispute many of the items you complain about are/were a problem, but they don't differ from other cars. Parts are more expensive and service rates higher - yes.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I know these cars really well, (I beg to differ)

and know the l322 is the evolution towards crap. I was blown away there was no center diff lock. (90% of this class of car dont have centre diff locks. The Range Rover is not designed as a hard core off roader like a Defender as an example. How long into your ownership did you discover this?)

I’ve owned gen 1,2 and 3 ffrr and these things are just not aging well. (I think they age very well. I do agree that they dont hold their value well but how can one be surprised when they are maintained by those who have very little knowledge and understanding of them. So many of the posts on this forum are proof of this).

Brakes tires and suspension have no longevity to them. (The car weighs nearly 3 tons and you complain about brakes and tires. C'mon. Lets try to be a bit more sensible here).

Transmission fail at alarming rates, (no they dont)

just look at how many transmission related threads there are. (Yes you can blame Land Rover for their daft service intervals on transmissions but that applies to so many manufacturers these days. They are all driven by the "bottom line". But as fars as being bad transmissions, the reverse is true. They are very reliable if looked after correctly - being looked after correctly does not mean having a stamp in the service book - and they have a very good life span).

M62 was tired in 2001 weak and frail. (the M62 is built like a tank engine and is super reliable. And I will say it again - if it is cared for correctly).

The 5.0 is plummeting in value because of timing issues. (I agree on this point. But as new procedures become available either from the manufacturer or from those willing to experiment, changing the timing chain tensioners has become a relatively simple and inexpensive job. This applies to all engines).

I know these cars and am sick of fixing them more than driving them. The short lived suspension bushings really piss me off. That’s hallmark of bmw quality. (this short lived suspension bushing problem is not a problem. Its by design. If you want a car that rides like a Range Rover, you need suspension components that are very pliable and sacrificial. You can fit cheap and nasty poly bushes but then you suffer the result. If you want a car that rides like a Toyota, go and buy a Toyota. You cant buy a Range Rover and expect it to be a Toyota).

I could write a book on incompetent garages/mechanics but I will relate one recent example. 2 days ago someone came to me pleading for help with problems on his 2003 car. Too many problems to list here but I have to mention the suspension. It handled like a pig and had a bad front end knock. It took 10 seconds to diagnose and one hour to fix. Pity I didnt take photos. A local Land Rover "specialist" had worked on the car a few months ago. They fitted one solid rubber bush to the right hand upper control arm (the rear most control arm on the front suspension for those that dont know) and did nothing with the left. They left the original in place. Can you believe it? And the guy was complaining in a similar fashion to many who complain on this and other forums. "He will never own another Land Rover and so on"

Give me a break. I see this type of thing on a daily basis and it can be a little frustrating to put it mildly.
I'm hearing your points, but they still sound like excuses for why the l322 sucks.

Every range rover prior had some sort of center difflock.

Sacrificial suspension components give me a break. The control are bushings are bmw parts bin same design bmw used in the 90's on all their cars and they notoriously failed on coupes and sedans.

M62 has never been a bulletproof engine and bmw was phasing it out by 2001. M60 was much more bulletproof once the nikasil issues were sorted, but M62 the timing chain guide and vanos issues make a motor with a bulletproof bottom end unreliable.

The brakes, especially on the early l322 are undersized and I wouldnt surprised if they were from an e38. calipers are even stamped bmw ate.

The transmissions do fail 5hp24 is a sedan transmission from the e38 era. It builds too much heat just lugging around the heavy range rover. The heat exchangers fail because the thermostat gets stuck closed, or the bottom of a radiator gets plugged from all the down time waiting at the shop. 6hp26 loves to find itself in transfault limited gears. It has a habit of puking its fluid out of the rear and the bridge seals fail. It is definitely better than the 5hp24 but this transmission should have been used from the beginning.

The l322 would have been a better car if it hadn't been built from the bmw parts bin of the late 90's. Every component is undersized and overstressed for weight of this vehicle. I am not a toyota person, but toyota definitely is more aware of this in the land cruiser. Their attempt to make it ride better is why land cruisers of the same era tend to have issues with collapsed front ends. At least they designed bespoke components meant to last 20 years instead of pull 20 year old components from the bmw parts bin. The more you pull the l322 apart the more you are shocked to find this to be true.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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354 Posts
This thread was started on the third anniversary of my purchase of an 2010 L322! It came with 50K miles on the clock and now has 120K miles. Ironically it has easily been the most reliable vehicle I have ever owned - I'm 62 and lived in more than one country so I've been around a bit. This is the only vehicle I've ever owned that I didn't get bored and fed up with after 3 years. I still smile when I see her sitting in my driveway. I've done all of my own maintenance. As for windshield wipers? There are some nice ones on Amazon for $12.
 

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L322 - 2005, 2006 na, 2012 sc
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111 Posts
Agree with many of the folks here - Deferred and improper maintenance seem to be the the primary cause of complaints along with unrealistic expectations.

People complaining about the transmissions really stumps me. The 6hp26 is in Chevy & Ford full size trucks with very few complaints. It's difficult to reconcile how an F150 owner considers it reliable yet LR owners complain incessantly about it. The 5hp24 in early L322s had great longevity.

M62 in early L322s is a great engine unfortunately it was not designed for the NA market and the retrofits to meet EPA regulations really hurt it. Timing chains being brittle.. They last 100k miles or better. Is it that problematic to change timing chain guides every 100k miles. It's maintenance, accept it or buy a different car that doesn't require that maintenance.

AJ V8 - Great engine. Variants were used in other Ford vehicles and are extremely reliable. The 5.0 had an updated design to timing components - What new engine does not have engineering upgrades after a few years?

As for the off road capabilities and open differentials with traction control - The system is very effective and quite smart moving the wear items from inside of the differentials to the brake pads which are easy to maintain.

Windshield wipers - Never had a problem finding them for cheap in any local autoparts store. I think I got my last set at Walmart when I was picking up engine oil.

CV axle failing - These don't just go without plenty of warning unless under a tremendous amount of stress. With an SC I can see how you could put them under a tremendous amount of stress in some situations. I don't think LR/RR CV axles are any worse or better from any other manufacturers.

Regarding values, complaints and perceptions about reliability and how expensive they are to service/maintain is what seems to be driving that. Not terribly uncommon for luxury vehicles. A perfect example is the comparison between a used Cadillac ESV vs. Suburban of same year / same mileage. The Chevrolet is more expensive even though the Cadillac has far more luxury features and shares the same sheet metal, drivetrain, etc.. There is a perception, real or perceived, of maintenance cost of a Cadillac vs Chevrolet... Range Rover or Toyota...
 
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