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Discussion Starter #1
I saw a youtube video that explains how to change the in tank fuel pump. It looks an easy job to do at home. I have a new Bosch fuel pump ready to be installed, but first I want some advices or experiences from another people.

Who has done this job before? what are the cautions to be attended?


Regards.
 

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Drain as much fuel as possible in that you will be shoulder deep holding the pump while getting it set. Also, double check that you have the gasket for the pump seated before tightening or it will bind and tear. I found out I had done that when after getting it all buttoned up and filling the tank to then have fuel dump out beneath the vehicle. Hardest part was disconnecting the 2 fuel lines from the top of the pump. There must be some special tool for this because it was a PITA, but doable.
 

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Make sure the tank is empty, or when you reconnect the fuel pump the gas gauge will think whatever level is in the tank is empty and your gauge will be off (it will never reset by itself). I had about 5 or 6 gallons in mine when I replaced my pump earlier this year and my gauge was messed up when I plugged it back in. I had to unplug the electrical connector, reopen the tank pull the fuel filter about halfway out and push both level floats down to the bottom of the tank with a pair of wood dowels while I replugged the electrical connectors back together, then I pulled the dowels out, put the filter back in, screwed the covers back on reconnected the fuel line and closed the tank back up. Works perfect now.

Note that my 06 is different than an 02 to 05 fuel pump. I have the fuel filter inside the tank and my pump is a separate unit stuck up under the front portion of the tank, with a separate jet pump in the opposite side of the tank. Idea is the same, there are 2 fuel level floats one on each side of the tank and they have to be sitting on the bottom of the tank when the electrical connector is reconnected or the gauge will read wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the answers, really the fact afraights me is the gas vapour.
Another doubt is with the fuel lines depressuration, because in the video the guy only unplug the battery and a fuel relay, but in the pelicanparts link, they despressurize the line manually with a screwdiver.
2 different ways to do or the guy in the video omits info?
 

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Just pull the fuel pump relay in the rear fuse panel and then start the truck (or try to) that will depressurize your fuel line and just a couple of drops will come out when you pull the line off. Mine didn't even have enough fuel in the lines to start when i did mine (and i was replacing mine due to faulty level senders, not a bad pump) it just cranked over for about 10 seconds before i turned the key off. Work with all the doors and rear gate open and you won't have an issue with fumes, don't use cell phones, plug in lights or anyhting else that could possibly cause a spark near the tank after its open. But in reality if you're more than a foot or so away from the tank there really isn't enough vapor to do much. The covers on the tank are plastic, the fuel pump is mostly plastic any you will have the pump disconnected from power before you open the tank anyway.

Oh an make sure you clean the top of the tank off very well before opening the covers into the tank, its real easy to knock all the dust and grit that sits on top of the tank into it once the covers come off.
 

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I just did mine this past Saturday. What everyone says is correct. Change the pump when the fuel level is low. Having to reach into a tank full of freezing cold gasoline is not pleasant. And having to stay in the cold gas to install the lower sending unit.... Took several tries because the gas was cold enough to make my hand instantly cold and numb after a minute.

I was told to unplug the negative battery cable before you unplug the pump connectors so you won't have to deal with incorrect level issues. If your levels are off, there is a computer reset procedure using the instrument cluster buttons and part of your vin that seems to work (but I may have just been fortunate).

The fuel lines are a story to themselves, I haven't found a foolproof method of dealing with those. A pinch never seems to work for me. (I actually pulled the orange outer ring off, and I use a small pick or scribe to gently move the inner tabs)

I didn't know there was a lock ring tool, I just took a large flat blade screwdriver and a hammer.... Tap tap tap.

Put the rubber ring in the hole before you try and seat the pump... Less fighting.
 

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I had to do it on my '03 about a year and a half ago.

As everyone has said, easier to do with less gas in the tank. But if you must work with your hands in the tank, get long gas-resistant gloves - you don't want your hands/arms soaking up gasoline. Not good in near term or especially long term.
Good time to replace your fuel filter too, easy to get to from underneath the RR.
If you're replacing just the pump and not the whole pump assembly with basket, you'll need to remove the steel band that secures the small tube from the actual pump to the rest of the assembly/basket. Too small to use a standard worm gear hose clamp, try to use the proper steel clamp, or maybe safety wire, because that will stay immersed in fuel. I used a plain nylon 'zip tie" or "tie-wrap", not what I would recommend, but all I had available. I don't know how long that will last before the fuel degrades it. It's been okay for 1 1/2 years or so, but I expect it to fail eventually.
I should have had a small steel band available, or some steel safety wire and tool.

If you do remove fuel from your tank with a pump before beginning, make sure you put the exact same amount back in when you finish, since the computer remembers the gas level.

It's not difficult, but best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I change the fuel filter the past year, thanks anyway !

Its necessary to change the fuel pump Seal oring (WGQ500020) and the locking ring (ESR3808 )?
 

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Make sure the tank is empty, or when you reconnect the fuel pump the gas gauge will think whatever level is in the tank is empty and your gauge will be off (it will never reset by itself). I had about 5 or 6 gallons in mine when I replaced my pump earlier this year and my gauge was messed up when I plugged it back in. I had to unplug the electrical connector, reopen the tank pull the fuel filter about halfway out and push both level floats down to the bottom of the tank with a pair of wood dowels while I replugged the electrical connectors back together, then I pulled the dowels out, put the filter back in, screwed the covers back on reconnected the fuel line and closed the tank back up. Works perfect now.

Note that my 06 is different than an 02 to 05 fuel pump. I have the fuel filter inside the tank and my pump is a separate unit stuck up under the front portion of the tank, with a separate jet pump in the opposite side of the tank. Idea is the same, there are 2 fuel level floats one on each side of the tank and they have to be sitting on the bottom of the tank when the electrical connector is reconnected or the gauge will read wrong.
I've done this twice on a 05 with various levels of gas, once almost full and on both times i did not have a problem with the fuel gauge reset accuracy. Bought a cheap pump first time and it failed within a year...

Pretty straight forward. I used a screw driver and rubber hammer to remove the lock ring IIRC, been a few years. I also removed the rear seats one time, and that made it much easier, as I like plenty of room to work. There used to be a great thread on this topic that was just excellent, so I'd do a search. Make sure you do insert the rubber seal first before the pump and seal ring or you'll never get the ring to seal properly as least I could not.
 

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I did this job on my 2004 about 6 months ago. Replaced the pump with a brand new Pierberg (OEM). I have the special BMW fuel pump retaining ring tool (Assenmacher BMW 4622) that you just attach a socket wrench to, it fit the Rover perfectly as it is a BMW part as well. (read my thread on bimmerforums to see what the tool looks like) The new pump also came with the 2nd float assembly for the other side, but when I opened the other side and felt around in the tank I couldn't locate the 2nd float assembly, so I just retained the original.

Well that turned out to be a big mistake because 6 months later, my fuel level sensor is shorted and i have a complete misreading of the fuel level on the dash. The instrument cluster (IKE) thinks i'm empty when in fact I have at least half a tank. The vehicle is also throwing a code that says "fuel level sensor circuit high."

So now I'm going to reopen everything and replace that 2nd float assembly. But where exactly is it in the tank? When I opened the driver's side fuel tank opening, there was no float assembly visible there.
 

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The tank is kind of kidney shaped when you look at it from the side, theres a short front section about 8" high in the front side of the tank and then the main section that comes all the way up to where the access openings are in the rear portion of the tank. The jet pump is in the front section just about dead center of the drivers side (LH) of the tank. The fuel level sender is attached to the jet pump. The pump has a plastic lower foot that fits into some indentations in the bottom of the tank, and a spring mounted post that fits into a socket in the top of the tank. You sort of have to pull the pump upward to get the lower foot out of its indentations and then pull the whole assembly backwards and out of the tank. Be prepared to be shoulder deep in the tank to get a good grip on it. Installtion is the reverse, you have to find the socket in the top of the tank put the post in it, lift up on the pump and push the bottom forward till the foot drops into the indentations on the bottom of the tank.

Make sure its that sender before going thru the effort, there are two of them one on the pump, and one on the jet pump. Each one does its half of the tank, and the IPC sort of averages them together thru some magic (because the jet pump side of the tank empties before the fuel pump side does). You can stick a meter on the terminals for the senders to figure out which one is bad.
 

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Make sure you use the oem type oetiker clamp or a 360 degree equal pressure type on the fuel line or it will not hold pressure as the line is quite brittle and is a beast to seal since heating is an issue. ? Dip in cup of hot water first. Removal of fuel lines qill br more difficulg ig thwy are pressurized.
 

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@Mark C: Thank you so much for your excellent description on how to get to the jet pump and drivers' side sender. I have a couple of follow-up questions. First, you reference the jet pump, but I haven't seen what that part looks like or what the part number is. I'll check microcat later today, but I'm of the opinion that since I'm going to be removing the jet pump on a car with 115k miles, why not replace it with a new one? I don't want to have to go back in the tank for a while. Did you replace the jet pump? Is it just a normal fuel pump, does it have a filter/strainer? And also, where is the power connection for it?

Second question: You mentioned measuring the leads going to the two fuel sensors, prior to opening up the tank, in order to determine which is defective. Given my error code (fuel level sensor circuit A high), would I just measure the leads going to each sensor one by one looking for a short? Or is there a minimum or range of resistance I'm looking for to identify the trouble area?

@diff: Thanks for your feedback. I'm very familiar with the oetiker clamps and have my pincer handy if necessary, however, which hoses are you refering to? All of the external hoses going to the pump assembly on my 2004 are hard, but flexible plastic with plastic snap terminals on all of the fuel lines. Even inside the tank, the two crossover hoses from the second float assembly have a plastic connector that connects to the main pump assembly. Any insight would be appreciated on what specific lines requiring oetiker clamps would be appreciated.

Thanks guys, btw...you may have saved me from purchasing an entire preowned fuel tank assembly which I was going to just replace the pump internals in and then do a full tank swap! This is the level of my Rover dedication and fanaticism! It's a sickness, seriously!
 

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If the sensor is shorted, one of the wires going to, or coming frm the sensor should have a resistance of 0 to ground. Just touch an ohm meter lead to each of the 4 wires going to the senders and the other to a good ground, when you find one that is 0 or near 0 follow the wire to the sender and that will tell you which one is bad. Mine was intermittant, if you sloshed fuel around in the tank the sender would work sometimes, and sit on 0 other times. I think mine was the one on the main fuel pump. I can't find a specification for the resistance values of the senders for the 02 to 05 trucks.

Heres the electrical connector for the fuel pump and senders, connector 1 and 4 is for the fuel pump (4 is ground), 2 and 3 is for one sender, 5 and 6 is for the other..

02-05 RR fuel pump elect conn.jpg




Here's the best image I can find for the 02 to 05 jetpump inside the fuel tank, and the piping connector to the main fuel pump. Kind of lousy image, but its in the workshop manual.

02-05 RR fuel pump+tank.jpg

This is what the 06 to 09 pump(s) look like. The jetpump is the same, the main pump and the connection to the main pump is different. The filter is inside the tank on the 06 and up as well.

06-09 RR fuel pump.jpg
This is the description of the jetpump from the 06 manual, it functions the same on the 02 to 05 trucks.

Remote Jet Pump

The remote jet pump is located in the front left hand side of the fuel tank. The jet pump has a spring loaded frame which secures the pump by compression in the fuel tank.


The jet pump is connected by 2 pipes to the fuel pump. One small diameter pipe supplies pressurized fuel from the fuel pump to the jet pump. The jet pump is also connected to the fuel pump swirl pot
by a larger diameter pipe. The pressurized fuel from the small pipe enters the larger pipe and the fuel flow causes a vacuum which draws fuel from the bottom of the tank via a filter. This fuel,
collected from the left hand side of the fuel tank, in addition to the pressurized fuel from the fuel pump is delivered back to the fuel pump swirl pot in the right hand side of the tank.


The fuel level sensor for the left hand side of the fuel tank is attached to the remote jet pump frame.


The remote jet pump is a serviceable component. Access to the jet pump is by removal of the flange cover on the top left hand side of the fuel tank.
 

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@Mark C: @diff: Thanks for your feedback. I'm very familiar with the oetiker clamps and have my pincer handy if necessary, however, which hoses are you refering to? All of the external hoses going to the pump assembly on my 2004 are hard, but flexible plastic with plastic snap terminals on all of the fuel lines. Even inside the tank, the two crossover hoses from the second float assembly have a plastic connector that connects to the main pump assembly. Any insight would be appreciated on what specific lines requiring oetiker clamps would be appreciated.
In case diff doesn't revisit this thread, the Oetiker clamp is the one inside the fuel pump assembly, where the pump itself connects inside of the assembly.
If you're replacing the whole pump assembly and not just the (much more reasonably-priced) pump itself, then you won't need to worry about it.
 

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It is the line that the actual fuel pump is connected to. In other words pressure out. Perhaps i misunderstood and you are changing the whole assembly. Mine bled off quickly as a regular type hose clamp will not properly tighten the line. Yes the hose from opposite side of tank clips in and has o rings so no change or issues there.
 

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Thanks 03. I did not see your post so excuse thd redunancy. One other point i found while testing the pump is that with a guage on the fuel rail when the key is turned (but not to start)the pressure comes up but the pump will shut off. If the pressure drops off quickly you will know that the line is bleeding off. Might be worth checking it before you close everything. As an fyi the pump will shut off without the engine running once up to pressure. Not sure what signal keeps the pump running when the engine is running.
 

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@Mark C: Thank you again for your detailed and clear explanation. I now understand the principle of the jet operation and how those two connecting tubes work. You also helped give me the confidence to dive into the fuel tank once again. When I got in there, I discovered the problem, the jet pump hose and lead connection to the main pump assembly had worked themselves loose and were disconnected. This was due to an installation error on my part a few months ago when I installed the new pump; I almost certainly did not push the hose/lead connection onto the main fuel pump assembly deep enough so it didn't lock.

Well, although the old sender is still good, while I had the tank seals open, I replaced the sender with the brand new Pierberg unit that came with my Pierberg pump combo from AutoHausAZ. It was simply to locate the tank molding location where the jet pump/second float assembly fits into and this time I had the luxury of only having to deal with half a tank of gas instead of a near full tank that I had last time when my fuel pump failed.

I had enormous difficult pushing the new sender hose/lead connection from the jet pump onto the main fuel pump assembly, though. It did not want to go on, but with careful pressure I was able to get it fully seated eventually. Unfortunately, when wrestling with it, the fuel pump assembly got caught on the side of the fuel tank opening and the plastic lock lever on the main fuel pump assembly that locks the jet pump host/lead connection on, snapped off outside of the tank, so I just made sure I fully seated the jet pump in hopes that it won't come back off.

Anyways, upon startup, my fuel gauge returned to the correct level. After checking for leaks (none), I filled the tank up and it reported a full tank, so mission success! Thanks again.

BTW: When removing the fuel pump plastic hose connections, it is a nerve-wrecking endeavor, as I snapped my original fuel pump plastic hose barbs months ago which lead to me replace the entire assembly. I found some suggestions in other posts here that the best way to remove those squeeze and snap on connections is to use the sharply angled-end of a plastic trim removal tool like this. Using a tool like this applies even upwards pressure that, I believe, puts the least amount of lateral force on the plastic hose barbs, minimizing the risk of snapping them.

PSA: If you snap a hose barb connection, a near $700 fuel pump assembly becomes useless.


Trim Removal Tool; Safe Way to Remove Land Rover Plastic Snap on Fuel Connections by M J R, on Flickr
 

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Well irony it seems was out for me! Despite my best efforts, today Rover 1 stalled due to lack of fuel pressure. As soon as the engine stalled while moving, I immediately shifted to neutral and coasted to the shoulder. When I pulled over and looked under the car, saw fuel leaking from the passenger's (pump assembly) side. So I pulled the fuses and relay for the fuel pump and called a tow truck, luckily I was only 5 minutes from home. Why did I pull the relay and fuses? Because I didn't want the fuel pump trying to prime and push more fuel out of the fuel tank into the road when the key was inserted, in order to get the car into neutral for the flatbed tow truck.

The orange plastic fuel pipe connector that attaches to the pump and to the blue line is damaged internally and bits of orange connector have broken off. As a result, when I push the connector onto the fuel pump plastic hose barb, it clicks, but with minimal effort, it can be pulled right back off. The black line is okay, but the blue line is affected. Under the pressure of the running pump, the blue line connector just pops right off and that's the source of the fuel loss.

Below is a video (yes I know it's in portrait but it was one handed and I was stressed) showing it in detail and some pictures.

I've read that the book procedure is to drop the tank and replace the entire line, have anyone has had any experience repairing/replacing the connector itself? If possible, I would like to retain the blue line and repair the connector without having to drop the tank.


2004 Range Rover HSE L322 M62 Broken Fuel Pump Connector
by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover HSE L322 M62 Broken Fuel Pump Connector
by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover HSE L322 M62 Broken Fuel Pump Connector
by M J R, on Flickr


2004 Range Rover HSE L322 M62 Broken Fuel Pump Connector
by M J R, on Flickr

 
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