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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322, 2013 LR4 HSE Lux, 2019 RR L405 Autobiography LWB
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Great, so it seems the 5.0 n/a is the one to get.

Will post my findings.

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Firstly a clarification on your knowledge of the Ford-JLR V8. The 06-09 4.4L NA and 4.2L SC are port injected and there is no VVT. The 5L, both NA and SC are direct injection and VVT.

in my experience, the cam chain guide/tensioner and sprocket wear is product of owner neglect and possibly some poor quality parts supplies. I say this due to my family owning 3 5L LR’s; 13 LR4, 11 L322, 19 L405 LWB AB.We are original owners of each vehicle, all are professionally serviced by JLR schedule, except oil services every 7500 miles always using JLR spec 5122 oil, primarily the Motul version. My son has over 240k miles on his LR4, the L322 has 173k and the L405 has 23k. That’s over 400k miles, never any valvetrain noise. As for high pressure injection, the L322 had a high pressure stainless steel line split at a sharp bend near pump at around 100k. We never owned any 06-09 JLR products, my 2003 L322 disaster; 2 head gaskets, transmission, alternator in under 25k miles, chased me away from brand. In hindsight, every failure was BMW related which was further supported by my 07 M5 experience thus I returned to brand in 11. These vehicles, along with my daughters Evoque and my partners’ I-Pace have been quantum leaps in quality and reliability from my earliest Rover experiences, 94 D90, 96 RR County LWB and 03 L322. I would not hesitate to buy any JLR product in future however I’d only buy new unless I really knew previous owner and how vehicle was actually maintained.

I have driven the 06-09 L322 and L320. As V8’s go, it’s on par with the Ford branded Coyote V8 to which it is akin. Not the smoothest, quietest nor is it impressive in hp/L efficiency. Appears durable. The 5L is the version that finished grad school. Far more refined, quiet and efficient.
 

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Not to nitpick, but I believe the 4.4L AJV8 has VVT. Only the 4.2 SC didn't. It had the two stage system where the 5.0 is continuously variable.
Also, I've been curious if the AJV8 and Coyote V8 are very closely related. The AJV8 started life prior to Ford ownership and the Coyote V8 was a variation of Ford's modular V8 that dates back to the early 90's. The bore and stroke are similar but the variable valve system is totally different design. Ford didn't use direct injection until 2018, long after they had sold JLR. Aside from displacement, its hard to find much in common between them.
 

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I used to have an 04 L322 with a BMW 4.4 engine. After replacing every rubber part in the engine compartment it ran great. By every rubber part, I mean everything including the heater pipe o-rings, and the valley pan gasket, which I think was the cause of the mysterious loss of coolant. Also with new rubber on all the engine covers = no oil leaks.

Currently I have an 08 L322 4.2 SC. I was skeptical of a super charger at first, but now I think every vehicle should have one. You will love the power. And it's not that complicated, especially compared to a turbo charger. The SC is self contained. It has it's own gear oil, which I'd recommend changing -- you can buy a kit on-line for $50. The fill and drain holes are easily accessible on the front. The by-pass valve is integrated into the SC, and it has an independent drive belt. The inter-coolers do add several hoses, and an electric pump to the cooling system, but a Rover already has a complex cooling system.

The only downside to the SC is replacing the heater hose that runs under it. And it seems to be one of the hoses that fails most often. Mine started leaking 3 months after I bought it (~125K miles). So I had to remove the SC to get to the hose, actually that operation is not that bad. It was the coolant manifold, which gave me a lot of trouble, that you need to remove first because the SC snout is under it. There are 6 or 7 hoses connected to the manifold, but my philosophy is replace all the hoses of the same age if one fails, so I needed to remove the manifold anyway. I used that opportunity to replace the thermostat also, which is inside the manifold. In the end, it took me longer to find all the part numbers than the actual mechanics of replacing them. The A/B kit was incomplete.

And just recently refreshed the brakes (new discs, pads and fluid), and replaced the diff and xfer fluid. Now, it drives like new.

One more thing, remove/discard the engine cover. The SC creates a lot of heat compressing the air. You don't need an insulated engine cover trapping that heat in.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I used to have an 04 L322 with a BMW 4.4 engine. After replacing every rubber part in the engine compartment it ran great. By every rubber part, I mean everything including the heater pipe o-rings, and the valley pan gasket, which I think was the cause of the mysterious loss of coolant. Also with new rubber on all the engine covers = no oil leaks.

Currently I have an 08 L322 4.2 SC. I was skeptical of a super charger at first, but now I think every vehicle should have one. You will love the power. And it's not that complicated, especially compared to a turbo charger. The SC is self contained. It has it's own gear oil, which I'd recommend changing -- you can buy a kit on-line for $50. The fill and drain holes are easily accessible on the front. The by-pass valve is integrated into the SC, and it has an independent drive belt. The inter-coolers do add several hoses, and an electric pump to the cooling system, but a Rover already has a complex cooling system.

The only downside to the SC is replacing the heater hose that runs under it. And it seems to be one of the hoses that fails most often. Mine started leaking 3 months after I bought it (~125K miles). So I had to remove the SC to get to the hose, actually that operation is not that bad. It was the coolant manifold, which gave me a lot of trouble, that you need to remove first because the SC snout is under it. There are 6 or 7 hoses connected to the manifold, but my philosophy is replace all the hoses of the same age if one fails, so I needed to remove the manifold anyway. I used that opportunity to replace the thermostat also, which is inside the manifold. In the end, it took me longer to find all the part numbers than the actual mechanics of replacing them. The A/B kit was incomplete.

And just recently refreshed the brakes (new discs, pads and fluid), and replaced the diff and xfer fluid. Now, it drives like new.

One more thing, remove/discard the engine cover. The SC creates a lot of heat compressing the air. You don't need an insulated engine cover trapping that heat in.
Got news for you. Turbos aren’t that complicated. One moving part. The turbine. Easy to rebuild.
Yes, difficult to access on the new Rovers without removing almost the complete front end.
My 98 Disco Tdi, the turbo has easy access. Off in about an hour.
But I still love my Supercharged RR.

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