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2013 L320 Range Rover Sport SDV6
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, just had a big 120,000 km service by East coast European, Erina (VVG BTW) who told me my control arms are cracking and will need replacing soon and it's a common fault. How come JRA can get away with a fault that occurs at a only 120,000 kms with a roughly AUS$1700+ bill? Any ideas why and if more robust ones can be found so it doesn't happen in another 100K!! The car's been serviced every 10k, cherished, done lots of long trips but has been on some corrugated dirt roads and I'm guessing the hammering is what causes it? But Range Rovers are supposed to be tough?!
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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841 Posts
The usual reason the lower control arms are replaced is because the bushings wear out and you get clunks.Most find it easier to just replace the whole control arm then mess with bushing replacement. I replaced mine a couple of years back, and ordered the cheapest ones I could find. I noticed that the welding on the new ones was much better than the factory ones.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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417 Posts
Hi. 120,000km is not bad at all.
I am sure control arms per se are fine, it is rubber bushings in them that go bad, likely it is bushings that shop was reffering to.
Please understand that those bushings are exposed to great stress from very heavy vehicle, all elements and also dry up and deteriorate with age regardless of miles/kilometers, driving style, vehicle maintenance etc. For the same reason tires unused even on the shelf will expire, crack up, dry up and so on. LR has nothing to do with that. 120,000km is pretty good number. Your sway bar bushings are likely deteriorated as well, if not worn then hard as wood and cracked.
1) please advise the shop to order new hardware for control arms (bolts, nuts, washers. As it is common that bolts cease up so bad that they need to be cut off.
2)If you never replaced sway bar bushings and links - replace them as well. These are not very expencive items and also do not last forever, if you'd be going trough suspension - just makes sense.
 

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The control arms do not crack - you were misled by you mechanic.
I think it was clarified that the bushings were cracking—not the actual control arms.

I just replaced the control arms on my 06’ after 100k miles and 13 years of use. I’m happy with their longevity. (But no so for that lower steering shaft—on my second replacement).


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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2013 L320 Range Rover Sport SDV6
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Discussion Starter #7
Hi everyone and thanks for the info. I've now got my head around the issue, now just have to wait until I get some clonks, or apparently a puddle of hydraulic fluid on the garage floor, while I save up some money to get them replaced!!
 

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2013 L320 Range Rover Sport SDV6
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Discussion Starter #9
The puddle was what the mechanic said would be the first sign of failing? I omitted to ask what the hydraulic fluid was for in a control arm or its bushes?!
 

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2006 Range Rover Sport 2016 Mercedes S550 4MATIC
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123 Posts
I don't think those items need hydraulic fluid.

My car is also leaking hydraulic fluid. I think it's from the transmission, leaking from the gasket of the oil pan. I'm thinking about replacing it.
 

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2013 L320 Range Rover Sport SDV6
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
A bit more knowledge has come my way (!) - the outer bush contains hydraulic fluid as part of its functional structure (they are not simply rubber bushes anymore) and that is why the first sign of the cracking in the bush is a leak. Once its dropped all its hydraulic fluid and the cracks get worse that is when the knocking noise appears under braking and it is very much the time to fix it. Apparently it is a common design these days with BMW, Audi etc also using similar technology. I originally and wrongly assumed "cracking" was in the actual arm as it is a fabricated and welded structure (really a type of "wishbone" in old terminology except it also controls the castor angle of the wheel).
 

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2013 L320 Range Rover Sport SDV6
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Discussion Starter #14
Yes it's not a petroleum based fluid so as to not effect the rubber
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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18 Posts
You guys are mistaken, both my front lower control arms cracked. In both cases it was the cylindrical rear section surrounding the bushing. On the right side a complete chunk of metal cracked out, the left side was just along the weld. The LR mechanic said it was most likely from having polybushings instead of factory since they are much harder. I will add that these occurred at very high mileage, 440,000kms, and I live in Midwest USA where we salt the roads for snow.
 

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Hi everyone and thanks for the info. I've now got my head around the issue, now just have to wait until I get some clonks, or apparently a puddle of hydraulic fluid on the garage floor, while I save up some money to get them replaced!!
Look at this guy who bought a Range Rover without a substantial 'mechanical maintenance trust fund' setup in 6 different currencies..... lol.

I just assume a cost per year and feel lucky if I come under that. You might want to get a 'service plan' for the next 5-10 years for the car from your garage and what it is likely to cost. You can work out if you want the vehicle compared to other alternatives? I know my projected costs for preventative maintenance and upkeep for the next 3 years following my last service after a great chat with the garage. You're either comfortable with it or not.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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You guys are mistaken, both my front lower control arms cracked. In both cases it was the cylindrical rear section surrounding the bushing. On the right side a complete chunk of metal cracked out, the left side was just along the weld. The LR mechanic said it was most likely from having polybushings instead of factory since they are much harder. I will add that these occurred at very high mileage, 440,000kms, and I live in Midwest USA where we salt the roads for snow.
Wow, 440,000 kms..
It would be interesting to get a quick rundown on what has been done to it.
How is the engine, tranny, diifs, etc. That is a lot of Kms.
 
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