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Discussion Starter #1
Is driving my 2006 RR with a suspension fault putting undue stress on my shocks and killing them?
What happens when the air suspension fails and the truck is no longer able to change heights, does all the weight of the vehicle falls onto the shocks or does the air suspension system have a failsafe mode.
 

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I don't own an l322 (wish I did!) however, no you are not doing any damage to your shockers. The shockers on a vehicle don't carry any weight, that's the air springs job, all they do is controll the spring and the body of the vehicle. Classic Rangies have two levels of EAS faults, soft and hard faults. From hwat your describing you have a soft fault. The vehicle maintains height, although you can't move it up or down (a hard fault would drop it to it's bump stops).
I'd be having a look and listen around and under the car, for air leakes and loose electicals. Apart from that i'm at a loss.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Just to add to this thread for future searchers (all 3 of you :lol: `) ), I just took mine in for an intermittent "Suspension Fault" message, and it turned out to be a clogged exhaust muffler and compressor dryer for the EAS (codec1A13-64/ bulletin LTB00077). Replaced in a couple of hrs under warranty. There seem to be literally dozens of causes of "suspension fault", so if you're under warranty, just take it in. But rest assured, if its a problem the car will let you know, and you will be down to the stops, otherwise just take it easy. Deep breath. Drive carefully observing for any issues, strange actions or sounds . You can try re-keying (take key completely out & restart) to reset. If there's any leveling issues (dropping) then you will need to get it more expeditiously evaluated by someone LR save.
 
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