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Hey guys, I just finished the timing job on my 2012 Range Rover Sport Supercharged.

Most of the quotes I got to do the job were in the 6-8K range, which I thought was absolutely nuts! After having done the job, I can see why they charge that much . . . .

It was, ahem, fun. Easily the most difficult mechanical job I have ever tackled. I'm not a trained mechanic, but I am certainly mechanically inclined (mechanical engineer by degree). The hardest part of the job is ROOM - obviously when you put a honking motor in a small truck there isn't going to be much room, but man-o-man there are some tight spots when you do this job. I've never had more skinned knuckles. I've also never had such sore hips, lower back, and shoulders. (and I'm a very fit guy)

Anyway, this isn't intended to be a DIY, because there are already 2 fabulous resources available:
  1. The factory workshop manuals (see the sticky at the top of the forum)
  2. Atlantic British video - thanks to Gareth and the AB team for recording the video! (in fact I spoke to Gareth several times during my project)
The AB video really helped give me the confidence that I could do the job. However, the AB video is on a naturally-aspirated truck. There are some nuances with a supercharged truck, so my intention here is to fill in a few of those gaps and provide some extra info. If you are not the DIY type, perhaps it can provide extra insight when talking to your mechanic. (and help make sure they aren't ripping you off)

Review both #1 and #2 above in detail before beginning the job. In fact, even if you don't do this yourself, you will find those resources useful, especially the AB video.

I have created a 23 page document with pictures you may find useful - instead of embedding all the images in the thread I have placed the document here. It's a Dropbox link which should never expire.

The document has a lot of good detail but here are some things I would add to, or emphasize, based on the AB video:

Procedural Tips:
  • ROOM - you will need LOTS and LOTS of room to do this job - you will have parts everywhere and they take up a lot of room (see the pic at the end of the thread)
  • Lift - I have a 4 post lift in my garage and it was invaluable - could you do the job without a lift? Yes, but no way I would do it. You will be up and down many times, bent over, bent under, bent sideways . . . .
  • Before starting the job, go have your A/C evacuated - I forgot to do this and let's just say it caused issues
  • Just about anywhere you see black plastic under your hood you need to remove it before starting - I was a bit surprised Gareth didn't remove more stuff in his video, the extra few minutes spent up front will make life much easier, especially when removing coils and injectors!
  • Remove all the A/C lines from the firewall to the condenser (the big line running to compressor you can leave connected to compressor) - this gives you a LOT of extra room to work and you are going to have to have the A/C system refilled anyway
  • Remove the fan - go to Autozone/Advance/whatever and rent a fan clutch holding tool and fan removal wrench (36 mm) - note that the fan clutch holding tool simply slips around the bolts on the fan clutch, you don't need to loosen them, etc
  • When removing cooling hoses, try to keep them together as a unit as best as possible, the routing is very complex so I tried to keep it “as together” as possible - once you disconnect each of the connections on the radiator side it becomes clear what you can keep together and what you need to separate - the bulk of the assembly I was able to just lay over on the passenger side fenderwell (shown in my referenced document)
  • Removing the radiator - this was more difficult than I thought it was going to be - take your time, I still broke some of the clips, etc. - it's a little difficult to see the areas that the workshop manual is pointing out, and you really have to peel some hoses, etc out of the way before you can pull the assembly out
  • Crank bolt - make sure you turn it the right way! Gareth mentions this in the AB video and the service manual calls it out clearly - even though I had looked at both "at some point" I trusted my memory and that was a mistake - it's a good thing I didn't break the crank bolt off . . . . by the way you can use a camera phone or endoscope/boroscope to figure out what type of crank bolt is installed and therefore what direction to turn
  • Before you pop the "grenade pin" on the tensioner make sure to pry up the tensioner "blade" or "guide" - quite by accident I talked to a Land Rover dealer mechanic and when I mentioned this job he very much emphasized this point - he said he has seen people not do this which causes the tensioner to not fully extend and then they had to break the vehicle down all over again!

Optional Procedures:
  • Walnut blast your valves - you can search for my thread on this topic, I guarantee your valves are coked with carbon, I wouldn't do this job without cleaning your valves but hey, to each their own
  • Supercharger isolator/coupler - supercharger is off anyway, replace with the solid, green color, aftermarket isolator
  • Supecharger oil - again, supercharger is off anyway, why not
Required Parts - there are some parts that did NOT come with the Atlantic British kit that are required:
  • Crank bolt
  • "friction" washers - you need 2, they go on the crank
  • charge cooler gasket - sits between supercharger/intake manifolds and the "lid" of charge cooler
  • supercharger gasket - sits between supercharger and intake ports on heads
  • probably a few more things I'm missing

Optional Parts:

  • Camshaft sprockets - these are the Variable Valve Timing "variators" that sit on the end of the camshafts, my truck had 73K so it was probably overkill to replace them, but since I was doing my own labor that's how I justified it
  • Water pump - I suppose you could debate if this is optional, depends on your mileage, in my opinion it's probably false economy to not replace them if you have over 60K or so - NOTE: there is a "quick connect" fitting on the water pump that in my opinion is a horrible design (see the document) - it's very fiddly and I had trouble disconnecting (actually I broke it)
  • Thermostat - probably more debatable here, but apparently these are problematic on our trucks
  • Upper timing covers (pics in my document) – these are the covers over the camshaft sprockets - mine were severely cracked, it was quite surprising actually, make sure to inspect yours!!!!! (weirdly, the threads on the new covers I received were NOT tapped, I had to tap them myself)
  • Socket head cap screws for replacing the torx screws on the perimeter of the charge cooler - these will make removal FAR easier in the future - there is a pic in my document
  • Supercharger isolator/coupler
  • High pressure fuel pumps - certainly optional and somewhat unrelated, but you may want to think about it (I have another thread on replacement), I was getting a low pressure code when going to Wide Open Throttle, new pumps fixed it
NOTE: if you have never used the site Lrcat for part number lookup you haven't lived. It was INVALUABLE during this job. If using Google Chrome, make sure to right-click "Translate to English". (it's in Russian)

Tools - Atlantic British can provide you with all the tools needed, however there are a few things you should be aware of:
  • Fan Clutch holding tool and Fan nut wrench (36 mm)
  • ½ to ¾ drive adapter (pic in the document) - unless you work on tractors for a living, you probably won't have a 3/4 drive wrench for the crankshaft bolt socket provided by Atlantic British
  • Enormous breaker bar – Gareth mentions this in his video but you need a very solid breaker bar, either it needs a LONG handle (hard to find) - OR - you can use something for extra leverage, I used the handle from my floor jack and it worked like a charm, it easily fit right over my 1/2" drive Harbor Freight breaker bar
  • custom tool for removing screws at the back of charge cooler (see my doc)
If you do try this yourself and have questions, feel free to ask! Happy wrenching!


garage.JPG
 

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Do you have any pictures of your "fix" for that POS plastic elbow on the water pump? I broke mine as well and was considering drilling that brass bung out and replacing with a barbed metal elbow also
 

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A few things:

Those cracks on the covers look more like the result of the casting process.

The PDF seems to stop in mid-job with the replacement of the supercharger isolator

Fantastic job tackling this yourself and posting here, thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
A few things:

Those cracks on the covers look more like the result of the casting process.

The PDF seems to stop in mid-job with the replacement of the supercharger isolator

Fantastic job tackling this yourself and posting here, thank you.
Agreed on the covers - I honestly believe they would have eventually leaked oil the cracking was so bad!

Regarding PDF, as I say in thread title it's just "tips n tricks" and not meant to be exhaustive - mostly things that I felt were either not covered in workshop manual or the AB video.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just thought of one more part that I had to buy, a crank seal (the one that goes in the lower timing cover).
 

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I'm looking at a 2013 RRS SC Autobiography with 57K. Already had the water-pump done at 36K. Date it was made is 12/2012 so towards the later build of the 2013's. Are these engines also involved? I checked the vin#'s involved but no mention of any 2013's. TIA
 
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