RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
2004 RR HSE. I had the front two air springs go out on me at the same time... so I opted for the new Coil spring conversion kit from Arnott. So far the rear end is a little droopy, but Arnott is sending my mechanic a newer, updated set of rear springs to get rid of that problem. They will be installed on Friday by Mike at Rover Land (highly suggest using Rover Land if you live in Utah as opposed to the dealer). I'll keep everyone posted on how that goes.

Now, for the question I came to ask. I would like to give my RR at least a 4 inch lift to accommodate larger tires for off roading. I'm guessing that there aren't too many late model RR owners out there that have converted from Air to Coil... but I'm going to take a shot in the dark. As I understand it, it is difficult to put a lift kit on any vehicle with a Macpherson Strut assy. on the front end. The rear end should be no problem (aside from alignment issues)... does anyone know of a company/shop/anything that has a solution to lift the late model RR's? Any tips/advice from anyone who has attempted this... any info that anyone has on the topic would be much appreciated.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
:?: all to their own, but why go back to coils - might as well have gone to leaf springs and solid tyres so you don't have to worry about punctures.

To lift it that much and retain wheel travel, you'll need longer shocks, longer springs and maybe a diff drop to keep CV angles within spec.

A solution to lift a late model RR - air springs. :twisted:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Its your choice, why not buy a defender, it's standard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I really want to lift my Range rover and prefer coil springs over air springs for two reasons: 1) I want to be able to take it off road 2) no one has ever done it :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
This is exciting! As soon as my extended warranty is gone and my suspension fails.... Coils it is.

Let me know the details with the lift as well, as that is the plan as well for mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
How does it ride with the coil springs compared to the air shocks. On my 95 classic going back to the coils was truly an upgrade for me driving endless dirt roads at higher speeds. My 05 Rover does ok on bad roads but I like my 95 w. coils better in the ride department (my 88 is best, lOL). I am not sure I would compromise the ride on my 05 with coils but one never knows.

How does it ride on and off road???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I considered a coil conversion when my front air strut went out. How about some pics when you get it finished.

As for a 4" lift using coils. It is not as simple as a solid axle rover. You could certainly do it with springs but the geometry of the IFS would cause tire wear problems and it would handle poorly. The answer is to lift it with a spacer between the front suspension mount and the body or modified wishbones.
 

·
Registered
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
148 Posts
....2) no one has ever done it :D
Whilst I admire the inference, have owned and extensively driven Land Rovers with both coil and air springs and IMO, the latter are superior in every respect when properly maintained and set up. My '93 Classic had the usual air spring woes when I bought it six years ago but once I renovated the system and re-mapped the ride heights so that under normal on-road/off-road driving the axles never met the bump stops, the system (when mated to the correct Boge dampers) offered far superior ride comfort and axle articulation that the coil spring version.

The thing people tend to forget when considering regressing to a coil spring arrangement, is that steel only offers a logarithmic load rating whereas air springs are linear. Toyota Landcruisers for example, are factory fitted with coil rates suitable for a moderate load and a comfortable tarmac ride. Here in Australia, many companies have become very profitable by retrofitting aftermarket coil spring/damper setups for drivers of Japanese vehicles who want to take them off road fully laden. On the other hand, a well maintained air spring system perfectly adapts to all on-road/off-road and load circumstances. In other words, coils will be fine unloaded or fully loaded, not both. If you want a 4WD vehicle with coil springs, buy a Defender or a Landcruiser.
 

·
Registered
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
148 Posts
Another aspect of air to coil spring conversion many people rarely consider is that such a regressive conversion makes the L322 relatively useless off road. Not only do you lose the ability to lift the chassis high up out of harm's way, the vehicle's independent suspension can no longer 'emulate a beam axle' in low range by using the EAS cross flow design which directs air across the chassis between adjacent air bags. In the original design, what is at once an optimized 'road' suspension in high range quickly becomes an optimized 'bush' suspension in low range.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top