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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a 2004 range rover with 150k miles with the BMW engine. I got the truck for really cheap. Since I bought the truck I have been reading a lot about the L322 model on this forum. Do you guys think I should just sell it and go for 2007+ as it is more reliable or should i just stick with the BMW engine? I am kind of on the fence because I have read a lot of posts saying the jag engine is more reliable. Sometimes i consider buying a 2007+ and other times I just think about running this one to the ground. Even if the transmission were to go bad do you guys think I could sell it for 2k? I have no maintenance records on it but at the moment the engine and transmission are fine and it runs fine. Should I do any preventative maintenance on it? I am not sure if the transmission oil was ever changed. I apologize for the long post and all of the questions. Thank you in advance!
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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If you plan on doing the maintenance then the BMW is the better option in my mind for two reasons: 1) You have both the RR and BMW community as a resource. Basically everything you want or need to know is available if you look or ask. 2) Engine parts are shared between the RR and BMWs so they are cheaper and easier to obtain.

The BMW loves to leak oil is the one draw back, but this can be easily handled - nothing serious leaks - but they leak from various seals. The BMW engine may be a bit easier to work on, but not by much. I have the Jag engine in my Jag.

It would not hurt to do a drain and fill on your transmission to see the condition of the oil - if it drains and is horribly black then fill it up with new fluid and drive it around and do a filter and drain and fill in a few hundred miles. Should take an hour and cost you $40, but you will know what you have.

I would also pop the driver side valve cover and take a very good look at your chain guides - if they look worn I would have them replaced - do not wait. Also check your PCV hoses at the back of the engine and make sure they are in good shape. Failure here will take out your engine and is rather common.

Come back and list your findings and inquire as to what else you should replace at the same time. Doing it yourself will set you back about $1k in parts when all is said and done.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I've always liked the BMW engined Range Rovers, they're such a good value for the money. They're incredibly easy to work on thanks to the simpler electronics and BMW drivetrain. The 5HP24 transmission is super common and there are tons of places that sell used ones, as well as plenty of rebuild kits if you're feeling ambitious. The engines are easy to work on and all of the common issues are very well documented at this point. Parts are reasonably priced as well.

Change the transmission fluid + filter, make sure the fluid level is good, and that'll prolong the life of the transmission considerably. The engine could have chain guide issues at 150k or 200k, I say just change the oil, change the chain tensioner (they redesigned it at one point to work better) and drive it until you hear rattling. The chain guides give plenty of warning when they're about to go. If you're paranoid, you can change them now and have peace of mind for the next 150k miles. The parts for the chain guide job are about $700 and it's about 30 hours of work if you do it yourself. You can look in my thread, I did the chain guides in my 04 Range Rover.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #4
I will definitely take care of the timing chain tensioner and pcv hoses. I am probably gonna hold off on the timing chain guides. I am just a little hesitant to change the transmission fluid to find out the transmission starts slipping or something. This is really helpful advice though and I appreciate it.
 

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I'll mention with leaking oil, it's such an easy fix. If you find any major oil leaks, it's either the valve cover gaskets, upper timing covers, or front main seal. All three are pretty easy to knock out, and while you're in there, you minus well do the timing chain guides. Of course that is a little bit of a challenge as you need the parts and special timing tools. Overall an easy, but tedious, job with basic hand tools and maybe a good 10ft long breaker bar :lol:

The BMW Rovers are solid, and as Danny said, likely the best value. You can purchase one with bad timing chain guides, fix it up for $1500, and have a great running vehicle for 2-3 years before something else goes. You'll probably spend $5000 in total that way, and that's what I've done with my girlfriend's truck and my mother's "garden" truck. Both were bought for under $1000, I spent $600 repairing them, and they both run great. Maybe a little rough around the edges like pealing interior paint or some minor scratches.. But well worth it.


I see you're in Illinois, if you ever need the timing tools, I'm at the South-East border of Wisconsin.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Range26: You asked about your transmission - various people provided answers. Again - the least intrusive thing you can do is open the fill plug - let what ever comes out drain completely and inspect what you have. 3-5l should drain out and if the fluid is black and/or very dirty you know your transmission was most likely never serviced. Refill with fresh fluid and drive with the knowledge you learned. It should not hurt anything and only help unless the fluid is pretty new already. If the tranny is at a state that a drain and fill is going to kill it - it will die shortly anyway. Were it me I would do what I suggested above - drain and fill and inspect and drive and then if it is dirty do another drain - filter change and fill. Dirty fluid is more destructive than clean fluid period. If clean fluid takes out your transmission then it was going to die soon regardless. A power flush is another story. You asked for preventive maintenance advice. Transmissions with clean fluid last longer than those with dirty fluid.

As to your engine advice request. If the engine is not making any chain rattle noises then only check your hoses - leave the tensioner alone as it is doing its job. If you do some research on this forum you will find one poster who had his guides fail and allegedly it ran for only a few minutes - his block was ruined. This is why I suggested you pull off Bank 2 valve cover and inspect. You will be able to see whether the guides are worn and near failure. If you want to run the risk they are on their final legs that is your option, waiting for noise is dangerous as you may be hours away from home or on the highway with the radio on and not hear them. The current engine I have in my RR had 118k miles on it - when I replaced the guides the guides cracked and broke with the slightest pressure. Grooves were evident. There is no magic number on these engines. I originally bought the RR with failed guides that destroyed the block and the engine had about 120k on it per the PO. The engine I replaced it with was from a BMW and it had 140k on it - the guides were in good shape - not sure if they were changed - but I changed them anyways (long story) You asked about preventive maintenance - inspecting what you have is the start.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Another service i recommend is the cooling system. The previous owner on mine used stop-leak at some point for a leak, ended up clogging the transmission cooler. Luckily, i caught it before any damage could be done. I would inspect the transmission cooler on the water side for any gunk. I also replaced the radiator since there could be stuff in there to clog it up. I got one from rockauto, Behr Hella brand for $187. I've never had a cooling system issue since and gives me piece of mind that its working as it should. Also, check the water pump. I just replaced mine for the second time after hearing a noise, the bearings were starting to fail and pulley had slight movement. Picked up a new one for under $100.
 

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2002 Disco II, 4.0 V8 all original, original transmission, all original electrics, door locks were rebuilt, and that's about it.

How many miles? Just over 200k... gets about 18mpg too

@dalek1

Your suggestion of "Just driving it" is the most idiotic thing I've ever heard. These trucks do require attention, and if he wants to drive it for a year, he will have to put some work into it. Whether that is $100, or $1000.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #10
So some more information on the vehicle. I just checked the coolant expansion tank and it has some solid pink/red stuff in it. Is this normal? I honestly think I might just sell it and get a 2007 even though I prefer the BMW engine. Plus there is a lot of grease and oil all over the engine which could be due to a leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Also for anyone that is interested I picked it up for 2800. If I buy an 2007 it will probably be at least 10-15k.
 
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