RangeRovers.net Forum banner

21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Ah I like a good old gearbox discussion. Like 'which oil discussions" there is never a conclusion, just lots to learn!

Agree the LT77 has a bad reputation which might be partly resolved with modern synthetic dedicated gear oil. When I swapped my 83 from 3 speed auto to a 5 speed manual I had the opportunity to use an R380. I wanted originality and the long stick option (gear selector (shifter) placed forward of the hi-lo range selector, which I understand was not an option with a R380. I got myself a rebuild early LT77 52A and filled it with Redline MTL. Shifting could be smoother but the box is very quiet.

The LT77 got improved over it's life with larger gears etc, G and beyond being the stongest (see Ashcroft Transmissions). The R380 is in essence an LT77, but stronger again to handle higher torques. When I did my research, the experts (Ashcroft etc) agreed an LT77 is perfectly fine and trouble free for daily use with some care and attention (maybe not hard core offroading). Replacing the ATF with a GL4 compatible EP oil will inprove wear for sure.

Trouble in America is 'good' is never good enough - you never know you might find yourself rockcrawling and then what? Better to just do a LS/dana etc etc swap, wreck you car and call it entertainment.

287420
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
I've always thought LT77 was a good gearbox and never lost one through damage but also didn't run them on ATF.

Still got a couple which I used in a rally car, late 80s early 90s when competing. Advice from engineer then was to run Motul EP and have always done that so no real direct comparison in my own vehicles.

Ran them on a 3.5 rated at 250 / 275 bhp with maximum rpm of 7000, competition clutch and used them hard. Slow change when cold, never fast into second ( just had to be a little patient) big gap from second to third ratio so changing at elevated revs it won't go fast into third. But generally far harder life than anything will get in these range rover vehicles. Limited slip diff in rear wheel drive vehicle and sometimes hot sticky slicks too, still didn't damage a box. They're tougher than current commentators project I feel.

One thing for 4WD use, if you're going to pull anything substantial then go for forward ratios rather than reverse to protect the idler gear bearing that gives the reverse ratio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Wonder if I know the owner.
I bought it from William at Western Team Rovers

From what, I understand he's a collector/broker that ships lots of RRCs to the States. Dutch Safari vouched for him and his trucks, which made me feel good about wiring the money sight unseen. This was by far the best RRC for the money I came across after a couple months of pouring over classified and and trading Whatspp messages with brokers of varying shadiness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
viscous coupling is magically good in my opinion and particularly in mixed traction conditions.
Good to hear. Googling "Borg Warner transfer case Range Rover Classic" yields a lot of horror stories. The worst being that the coupling can seize while you're driving at speed and ruin basically everything. I've also read they generally have a 100K mile lifetime, and this truck is at 98K...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
I'm hopeful the LT77 will be in good shape. The truck looked very well looked after. It got a respray before shipping, but the seller sent me before pics, and the body was super straight, so I doubt it saw much off-roading. No service history available, but I'm hoping immaculate interior and exterior = responsible owner who did regular oil changes and maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Mine currently at 160,000 miles without problem. I'd encourage to read through the link back a few posts to see it discussed there as I believe there's important knowledge there.

I certainly take care to make sure wheel circumference matches all round with tire pressures used to match rear rolling dimensions if severely loaded.

The 100,000 is just one of the misconceptions, they effectively don't wear if treated correctly. Big discrepancy of rolling circumference will cause it to stress and heat unnecessarily, bringing premature failures. Generally people don't attach their usage to the problems it causes, just post about failure. If it's ok when you get it I'd attach reasonably good confidence to being able to keep that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
I'd encourage to read through the link back a few posts to see it discussed there as I believe there's important knowledge there.
Read through the whole thing. Super helpful--and fascinating. Thank you! Such an artful solution, and the liquid-to-solid transition is a bit magical. Not sure if it's the same principal, but reminds me of the D30 armor in my motorcycle jacket. Flexible and softish when you gently twist it--but rock hard if you hit it with a hammer.
 

·
Premium Member
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
455 Posts
Good to hear. Googling "Borg Warner transfer case Range Rover Classic" yields a lot of horror stories. The worst being that the coupling can seize while you're driving at speed and ruin basically everything. I've also read they generally have a 100K mile lifetime, and this truck is at 98K...
I thought it was a Range Rover? Not a truck, it is a classic luxury car.
I have seen one do 800.000 km without replacement of the BW unit. With due respect, my ex had only 450,000 on his when he moved out.. just give it it's regular oil and change the satellite shims when needed . They are the same as in the LT230, which lives in my older Rangie.
 

·
Premium Member
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
455 Posts
Ah I like a good old gearbox discussion. Like 'which oil discussions" there is never a conclusion, just lots to learn!

Agree the LT77 has a bad reputation which might be partly resolved with modern synthetic dedicated gear oil. When I swapped my 83 from 3 speed auto to a 5 speed manual I had the opportunity to use an R380. I wanted originality and the long stick option (gear selector (shifter) placed forward of the hi-lo range selector, which I understand was not an option with a R380. I got myself a rebuild early LT77 52A and filled it with Redline MTL. Shifting could be smoother but the box is very quiet.

The LT77 got improved over it's life with larger gears etc, G and beyond being the stongest (see Ashcroft Transmissions). The R380 is in essence an LT77, but stronger again to handle higher torques. When I did my research, the experts (Ashcroft etc) agreed an LT77 is perfectly fine and trouble free for daily use with some care and attention (maybe not hard core offroading). Replacing the ATF with a GL4 compatible EP oil will inprove wear for sure.

Trouble in America is 'good' is never good enough - you never know you might find yourself rockcrawling and then what? Better to just do a LS/dana etc etc swap, wreck you car and call it entertainment.
I beg to differ about the R30. It is by no means stronger but more fragile because of the 3 bearings on the layshaft, triple Syncros etc.
We repaired both gearboxes for 12 years in France and i still do it every now and then
My lt77 of the very early version needed new bits after 500.000 Kms and loads of off roading.
Can't blame it.
The r380s I have seen over the years usually do about 250.000 to 300000 until the first repair. Invariably it is the little bearing between the primary and mainshaft and the synchros which fail.
My p38 had 285000 when it happened going home on the dual carriageway from Bordeaux. So it was no exception. At least I had an exchange box sitting there and could assess the damage calmly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
I thought it was a Range Rover? Not a truck, it is a classic luxury car.
Sorry, of course. Although I wanted the Euro-spec version because it is so much more utilitarian. The U.S. models have so many bells and whistles that seem like a never-ending parade of things to break.

Thanks for all the feedback. Making me feel much more optimistic that I won't have to immediately do major repairs to my new "classic luxury car."

I'd love to take you up on the manuals offer. Is there a good way to DM you and exchange addresses? I can Amazon you a flashdrive directly.
 

·
Premium Member
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
455 Posts
Sorry, of course. Although I wanted the Euro-spec version because it is so much more utilitarian. The U.S. models have so many bells and whistles that seem like a never-ending parade of things to break.

Thanks for all the feedback. Making me feel much more optimistic that I won't have to immediately do major repairs to my new "classic luxury car."

I'd love to take you up on the manuals offer. Is there a good way to DM you and exchange addresses? I can Amazon you a flashdrive directly.
Sure. PM sent.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
26 Posts
I ran a VM'ed Range Rover for about two years, never had an issue with it. You will not win any races but will cruise at 70 nicely. Just wished Land Rover would have fitted the 5 cylinder that they had as a test mule.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
A couple more questions for you helpful folks:
  • Advice on rust-proofing? We don't salt in Seattle, but it rains a lot, and I don't have a garage. Worried both about the undercarriage and water seeping into problem areas (doors, tailgate, etc.).
  • Favorite roof rack? Considering adding simple feet and cross bars--not a full safari rack.
Thanks!
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top