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Discussion Starter #1
Just purchased a two-door 1991 RRC 2.5 VM Turbodiesel. On the boat from Spain to Seattle as we speak. Pics and vids look great. No rust, super clean, 98K miles, solid interior.

This is my first Range, and I'm wondering if any wiser, more experienced folks have advice on initial inspection and service, common problems, simple fixes and upgrades, etc.

Thanks!
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Congratulations.
It is a fantastic car, just never run the 2.5 VM longer than necessary (i.e. only while overtaking a truck) at more than 2800 revs.
 

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I used to live in France and have seen many in my business. My ex converted his immediately to 200 tdi, but then I had another client whose had 800.000 kms on the clock with the original engine when I left France.
So if you need help to source the parts, a good counsel or admiration, you can always ask me.

PS Pictures PLEEEEEASE
 

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I hear that it's pretty popular to relocate the coolant expansion tank as high as possible, to let steam out oft he engine. Also, to add a tube from the engine cooling system with a T to the tank, to give another path for the steam to escape.

I'm sorry I cant be more precise, I don't have a VM Range so I don't even know exactly how the cooling system works in that motor, but I know it's a pretty popular mod in Italy (land of the VM engine). Maybe Annette knows more about it.
 

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Yes Tex, Italy and France had lots of VM 2 doors.
Never heard of the steam trick, in france we used to recommend a bigger radiator and header tank. But I always love to learn new things. Here in my new country ther are only 4 VMs
 

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I found some pics of the modifications. They add a T on the hose that connects the heads to the top of expansion tank, and connect it to the heads. At least I think, I'm not familiar with that engine.
The Italians swear by it, they say to allows steam to escape the heads and keep them full of liquid coolant. Also, they relocate the expansion tank as high as possible, in order to make it easier for steam/bubbles to come up.
I'm Italian too but my Ranges are V8s, so I have no direct experience of any of this.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks so much for this advice. Sounds like I should do something to help with cooling. These mods sound like a good place to start. I'm told the gaskets were just redone, so I'd like to preserve those. Body is extremely clean and straight with no rust in any of the hot spots, so I'm hoping that means it was well looked after mechanically as well. Seller seems reliable on got the endorsement of some well known U.S. import/resto shops. But I'm hoping for the best and expecting the worst. A few photos below. Hopefully, it actually looks like this when it shows up!


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WhatsApp Image 2020-06-17 at 8.12.53 AM.jpeg
 

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Discussion Starter #8
One more question: Any ideas on sourcing service and engine manuals in English? I've been poking around on eBay but nothing so far. Thanks!
 

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Absolutely gorgeous! Looks spec is a little basic, but makes it more pure. It looks so clean!

Not sure about a manual for the VM diesel, but it is a very common engine so parts should be relatively easy. In the UK they went straight to the Rover 200/300 tdi engine.

I do see your manual gearbox is the R380 which is good, better than the LT77 5 speed option.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Also I believe the 1991 unfortunately has the LT77 and BW transfer case. Going to have that looked at right away, as I understand viscous coupling seizure can have very bad consequences.
 

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In the UK they went straight to the Rover 200/300 tdi engine.

I do see your manual gearbox is the R380 which is good, better than the LT77 5 speed option.
VMs existed in the UK until 91/92. That’s where they gained their terrible reputation
 

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Also I believe the 1991 unfortunately has the LT77 and BW transfer case. Going to have that looked at right away, as I understand viscous coupling seizure can have very bad consequences.
Park with the handbrake on, then jack up one front wheel and try to turn it. If you can tun it by hand, albeit slowly, the VC isn't seized and you're fine.
 

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Right, did not know the VM was used in the UK. I thought the UK skipped that and went straight to the 200TDI. Seemed that Southern Europe always loved to have a diesel (tax thing) and VM Motori is some Italian outfit no?

Also on the LT77/R380, I was basing that conclusion on the shifter being behind the hi-lo selector, but then I think the LT77 also came in that configuration right? My LT77 has the forward (long stick) shifter. The best way to determine what box is fitted is to look at the shift pattern with the R being left of 1rs on the LT77 and below 5 on the R380.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Any tips on insurance? Bluebook value is way low but most classic car agreed-value policies don't let you use it as a daily driver. I don't plan to put tons of miles on it--7K to 10K a year--but it's not going be a show car either.
 

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One more question: Any ideas on sourcing service and engine manuals in English? I've been poking around on eBay but nothing so far. Thanks!
Yes I have the complete collection in French and English . Happy to help with my scans. Send me a USB stick of at least 2 GB and I will fill it.
 

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Right, did not know the VM was used in the UK. I thought the UK skipped that and went straight to the 200TDI. Seemed that Southern Europe always loved to have a diesel (tax thing) and VM Motori is some Italian outfit no?

Also on the LT77/R380, I was basing that conclusion on the shifter being behind the hi-lo selector, but then I think the LT77 also came in that configuration right? My LT77 has the forward (long stick) shifter. The best way to determine what box is fitted is to look at the shift pattern with the R being left of 1rs on the LT77 and below 5 on the R380.
VM s all have an lt77. No guess needed.
What do you mean by shifter the gear stick?

Not only the south loved them, all of France did. Actually the insurance was the same for v8 and diesel but 10l of diesel for 100 km were half the price of 16l of petrol .
My green Rangie became a 200tdi for that reason.
 

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Thanks so much for this advice. Sounds like I should do something to help with cooling. These mods sound like a good place to start. I'm told the gaskets were just redone, so I'd like to preserve those. Body is extremely clean and straight with no rust in any of the hot spots, so I'm hoping that means it was well looked after mechanically as well. Seller seems reliable on got the endorsement of some well known U.S. import/resto shops.
It is from Barcelona which has a fantastic classic car scene. Wonder if I know the owner.
And it look gorgeous.. I bet your new pet will be in perfect hands
 

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Also I believe the 1991 unfortunately has the LT77 and BW transfer case. Going to have that looked at right away, as I understand viscous coupling seizure can have very bad consequences.
They have some "characteristics" that aren't readily understood I feel. But that viscous coupling is magically good in my opinion and particularly in mixed traction conditions. It'll give 100% lock when needed but no need to unlock for high surface grip use it will just do it all for you. It makes the vehicle very capable.
I'll try to find a link to another long thread on here to show how they work as it's a worthwhile read to understand.
To test, also, you have to secure the rear axle, lift one front wheel just off the floor, put transmission into neutral, and then the raised wheel should turn very slowly just by holding the tire with you hands. Its veeeery slow and thick fluid feeling, about 30 secs to rotate half a turn is normal.

LT 77 be careful, they are decent gearboxes but definitely not a fast/sporty shifter ;) but looked after well should be capable of high mileage without problem.
There's anecdotal evidence to run them on ATF oil which ultimately lets the bearings wear prematurely. They absolutely need an EP gear oil and preferably Motul 75/80 EP as first preference. This is from the engineer responsible for their development who rebuilt my LT 77s for me.
Don't use "friction reduction" additives either, it prevents the synchronisation rings from doing their job and makes the change MORE notchy not less.
 

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Here's the link, worth a read all the way through as we discussed it in detail


As said previous post, much of opinion comes from little knowledge about them.
 
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