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2010 Range Rover SC
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey All,

I've been a long time reader and always dreamed of owning a Range Rover. I finally bought one last year and it has been a dream to drive. I have the 2010 Range Rover Supercharged

Yesterday while driving my entire range lowered to its bump stops and wouldn't raise at all. If I try to raise the suspension i hear a loud hissing noise around my front right tire. I took it to my local indy and after running the codes he saw that I need a new Strut Assembly RNB501520 ($1,301.23) Control Valve(235.14) and Air Compressor(799.42).

He included warranty on all of his parts and labor which put me at ease but I wanted the communities perspective.

Total Parts cost is $2,335
Total Labor is 500 for everything.
 

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2010 Range Rover SC
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Discussion Starter #3
Yes that is for 1. So before I bought it the previous owner(s) did a ton of work which included replacing the one of the front struts about 2 years ago. I would have done both otherwise. I have owned cars in the past with Air Suspension so I expected this to happen but I am curious as to what is a reasonable price.

One thing that put me at ease was the fact that I am getting a warranty for the labor.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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226 Posts
Congratulations on your Rover acquisition, and welcome to the forum.

In 2018 for the 2003-2005 BMW models, each strut was about $1,000 at a shop, or $1,100 if you can't reuse the inner hydraulic shock absorber due to wear. It seems your part number likely includes a new inner shock. The two prices rise to $1,600 / $1,800 at a dealer. The front struts often fail within a few thousand miles or more of each other, but not always. So many folks do both when replacing one. The rear air bags can last indefinitely, very robust.

My guess is that your strut and compressor prices are reasonable for a typical shop.
 

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Are they using OEM parts? Also, what makes him think the compressor is bad? If its leaking air, pretty hard to evaluate its performance. He should replace the strut then see if the compressor is slow to fill the bags.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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What brand of Strut and Compressor? I am sure your Indy is marking up the cost by 20-40%. You could potentially purchase online and have him do the install if he is cool with that. Personally, I bought online and had a trusted mechanic (rover tech) install at a body shop where he is restoring a Corvette after hours. He did both front, rear and Compressor for $350 cash. I had to take to an indy to have the compressor software updated $75. So total was $425. I bought Arnott which has a lifetime warranty. If my Indy bought and installed Arnott the warranty was only 2 years and they would not install the parts unless they bought them. I saved a few dollars taking this approach.
 

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2010 Range Rover SC
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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you guys! I appreciate the response. Want to use them as my go to Indy shop but wanted to make sure they aren't trying to rip me off

@NorCal RR when he ran the test for the Strut he mentioned that the Compressor is getting weak and recommended replacing it since it was running a lot. The compressor comes with a lifetime warranty and since I am at 105k miles I figured I get it done. Looking at my service records the compressor was never replaced.
 

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2010 Range Rover SC
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Discussion Starter #9
What brand of Strut and Compressor? I am sure your Indy is marking up the cost by 20-40%. You could potentially purchase online and have him do the install if he is cool with that. Personally, I bought online and had a trusted mechanic (rover tech) install at a body shop where he is restoring a Corvette after hours. He did both front, rear and Compressor for $350 cash. I had to take to an indy to have the compressor software updated $75. So total was $425. I bought Arnott which has a lifetime warranty. If my Indy bought and installed Arnott the warranty was only 2 years and they would not install the parts unless they bought them. I saved a few dollars taking this approach.
He is using the Arnott Strut as well. But he said if I bought my own he won't warranty the labor. I want to make sure that I get this done once and won't have to worry about this for another 10 years. He preferred using Arnott and said they are better than OEM. But he is getting new ones not rebuilt or refurbished.
 

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I'm sorry to hear that the respondents don't find the list of things to replace and the cost of parts and labor excessive. I suggest you search the forum for front air strut replacement, and not specifically to the 2010, since the air suspension is largely common on all since 2003.
The front air struts are a common wear item. If your previous owner replaced one side (probably the right) 2 years ago, it's about right for the other side (usually left) to last a couple years beyond that.
Your question has been asked and answered a thousand times in these forums.
There is very likely no need to replace anything other than that air strut.
The air bag on the strut dry-rots at some point, and leaks air from that point/height. The rest of the pneumatic system are just working to keep up. The compressor has a temp sensor that will shut it off before it would get damaged.
Only replace both sides if both have failed, or you have plenty of money to spend on recreational repair that isn't needed. As I said above , they don't typically fail at the same time. If you research existing posts, you'll find the right strut always fails before the left (fronts, the rear airbags almost never fail. I still ave the originals on my 2003 and my 2012)

Look for the price of replacement air shocks or air struts on Rock Auto, including Arnott (I used Arnott for the most recent one I replaced), and you'll see the prices are not near the price they want to charge you. You can find replacements between $300 - $500 easily depending on preference of brand including the OEM suppliers, new or rebuilt (I don't recommend rebuilt).

It's not a terribly hard job to replace the front air shocks. I've got over 10 years of practice (= about 5 air shocks replaced) and can replace an air strut in about an hour with no special tools.
Arnotts have lifetime parts warranty to the original buyer. Other brands generally last maybe 5 years, depending on where you
 

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2010 Range Rover SC
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Discussion Starter #11
I'm sorry to hear that the respondents don't find the list of things to replace and the cost of parts and labor excessive. I suggest you search the forum for front air strut replacement, and not specifically to the 2010, since the air suspension is largely common on all since 2003.
The front air struts are a common wear item. If your previous owner replaced one side (probably the right) 2 years ago, it's about right for the other side (usually left) to last a couple years beyond that.
Your question has been asked and answered a thousand times in these forums.
There is very likely no need to replace anything other than that air strut.
The air bag on the strut dry-rots at some point, and leaks air from that point/height. The rest of the pneumatic system are just working to keep up. The compressor has a temp sensor that will shut it off before it would get damaged.
Only replace both sides if both have failed, or you have plenty of money to spend on recreational repair that isn't needed. As I said above , they don't typically fail at the same time. If you research existing posts, you'll find the right strut always fails before the left (fronts, the rear airbags almost never fail. I still ave the originals on my 2003 and my 2012)

Look for the price of replacement air shocks or air struts on Rock Auto, including Arnott (I used Arnott for the most recent one I replaced), and you'll see the prices are not near the price they want to charge you. You can find replacements between $300 - $500 easily depending on preference of brand including the OEM suppliers, new or rebuilt (I don't recommend rebuilt).

It's not a terribly hard job to replace the front air shocks. I've got over 10 years of practice (= about 5 air shocks replaced) and can replace an air strut in about an hour with no special tools.
Arnotts have lifetime parts warranty to the original buyer. Other brands generally last maybe 5 years, depending on where you
But if one Strut had a leak would that cause my entire truck to drop completely on its bump stops. The whole car was insanely bumpy when driving and completely low. From the posts I read people usually have a sag on one side or it leaks overnight.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The struts are a fairly straightforward job for any shop. The toughest part is often undoing the pair of large bolts/nuts which attach the lower part of each front strut to the hub, due to corrosion.

I recommend replacing the front strut pair at the same time. However, I would wait on replacing the compressor and front valve for now - so long as the replacement struts inflate correctly your existing compressor should get less of a work out going forward due to the prior continual leaks being “fixed” and the link valves rarely fail.

I’ve used multiple parts from rockauto.com including several sets of replacement front struts with zero problems. The savings are worth the offset in “shop warranty” coverage for the shop’s markup. The shop is a business and there’s no harm in saving several hundred bucks by sourcing the parts yourself. You can put the money you save in your rainy day jar for the next repair ;)


You didn’t mention whether your car has variable damping or not but you’d need to know before ordering the parts yourself. Basically, just raise the hood and look to see whether there’s a wire going to the top of each front strut or not. If not, you have regular (non-variable) damping.

The struts are the same for L322 MY 2010-2012 supercharged vehicles so I just included a generic link for MY2011.

Rob
 

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Front struts and bags were replaced on mine recently but not the air compressor At a total cost of 1500 parts and labour
 

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2010 Range Rover SC
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Discussion Starter #14
The struts are a fairly straightforward job for any shop. The toughest part is often undoing the pair of large bolts/nuts which attach the lower part of each front strut to the hub, due to corrosion.

I recommend replacing the front strut pair at the same time. However, I would wait on replacing the compressor and front valve for now - so long as the replacement struts inflate correctly your existing compressor should get less of a work out going forward due to the prior continual leaks being “fixed” and the link valves rarely fail.

I’ve used multiple parts from rockauto.com including several sets of replacement front struts with zero problems. The savings are worth the offset in “shop warranty” coverage for the shop’s markup. The shop is a business and there’s no harm in saving several hundred bucks by sourcing the parts yourself. You can put the money you save in your rainy day jar for the next repair ;)


You didn’t mention whether your car has variable damping or not but you’d need to know before ordering the parts yourself. Basically, just raise the hood and look to see whether there’s a wire going to the top of each front strut or not. If not, you have regular (non-variable) damping.

The struts are the same for L322 MY 2010-2012 supercharged vehicles so I just included a generic link for MY2011.

Rob
Thank you for your input. I have the variable damping. Unfortunately I gave them the green light to start working on it. I honestly freaked out when the entire truck dropped on the bumper stops.

I'll be honest, they scared me when they said I can buy the cheaper part online myself but they don't always last long. This is my wife's daily driver and I don't want her to get stranded.

Anyways with all the knowledge from everyone I am going to order the struts for the rear and my left strut so that I can replace them right away if they start leaking.
 

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Compressors don't usually go bad unless you run them with leaks in the system. My old P38 has the original compressor never rebuilt and 21 years old. And I think L322 compressors are a better design.
I would try to change the plan to use Arnott bags. Perhaps their P38 product is better, never used them. But my prior experience with them on my P38 is that their quality is below OEM and they are difficult to work with. I've heard similar on the L322 product. The guarantee part reminds me of Tommy Boy,
 

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Paraphrasing from a post above...."It's about right for the left side to last a couple years more than the right...they don't usually fail at the same time....waste of money to replace both."

Unless one strut is made of titanium and the other of styrofoam, I'm unsure how one should expect the two to last "years" apart. Mine failed within a brief 6,000 miles of each other. As one might expect basically identical components to. And my struts most definitely didn't get the memo -- the left rudely failed before the right.

If one replaces all eight spark plugs at once, and both upper and lower radiator hoses / control arms / brake rotors at once, for those who aren't poor it's not unreasonable to replace both struts at once if you're near the 100K mile mark when they typically fail anyway. Unless you're just into tow trucks.

For what it's worth, my air compressor failed at 91,000 miles, prior owner so I don't know the details.
 

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Unless one strut is made of titanium and the other of styrofoam, I'm unsure how one should expect the two to last "years" apart. Mine failed within a brief 6,000 miles of each other. As one might expect basically identical components to. And my struts most definitely didn't get the memo -- the left rudely failed before the right.
Nice to know, but I notice that you joined the forum about 18 months ago, and I'm guessing that you haven't read through every post related to this problem that's been one of the most discussed. There are reasons that have been discussed, and I'm not giving a history lesson about it since it's all available in the last 17 years of posts, free for the reading. I understand that it wouldn't make sense to you, but what I'm contributing is from the perspective and experience of someone who has read posts in this and other RR forums for the last 13 years, and done a good bit of wrench turning for the suspension system and almost all other parts of my JLR vehicles.

You said your failures were 6000 miles apart. Did you install both of those at the same time & mileage? Or were they what came with a used RR you bought, and you don't know when they were installed? I'd bet that the previous replacements weren't done in pairs, so when each one fails will depend on how old it is. For most who do our own work, these air shocks are expensive enough where we don't replace a good one because the other one failed.
Assuming that you bought your 2003 - 2005 not too long before you joined the forum, I have almost no doubt that it's on it's 2nd or 3rd set of front air shocks, depending on where in the country it's been. Your left one may have been replaced 7 years before it failed, maybe 2 years after the right failed; and unless you've owned it since new, you wouldn't know. But then if you had owned it since new, you would have joined long before Sept 2018.

If you can't understand or are "unsure" of something that's reasonably common knowledge for those that have been in the forum and had the L322 for longer than 10 years, (depending on geographical location), I'm okay with that. You haven't been around long enough, and haven't done the homework and caught-up, although I'd bet that you feel like you've read through all there is to read that's worth reading.
If you want to understand it, scour through the posts related to the subject over the last 15 years or so, in detail.
 

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I had just my left side front bag replaced, strut stayed on. Dealer did it for $1100. I didn't see any point in touching the right side front as it was obvious that work had been done there prior to my ownership (top nuts showed evidence of being removed and replaced). I'll confess I drove my poor vehicle for 100 miles on the bump stops with the compressor alarm full on - when I got home I took the turtle shell off to let it cool down. Next morning I drive to the dealer 20 miles on my bump stops. Compressor has been fine and didn't need replacing.
 

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03rangiemark: If you could post some sort of link that backs up claims that it's the NORM for one strut to outlast the other by a "couple years" -- so let's say a 30,000 mile difference between struts -- that would be helpful. As opposed to a NORM of something much less than 2 years or 30,000 miles.

A strut can fail at any random age or mileage, but I've never heard it's the NORM for Rover struts to outlast each other by 2 years or 30,000 miles if installed at the same time.
 

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03rangiemark: If you could post some sort of link that backs up claims that it's the NORM for one strut to outlast the other by a "couple years" -- so let's say a 30,000 mile difference between struts -- that would be helpful. As opposed to a NORM of something much less than 2 years or 30,000 miles.

A strut can fail at any random age or mileage, but I've never heard it's the NORM for Rover struts to outlast each other by 2 years or 30,000 miles if installed at the same time.
I could, but then you're asking me to search for things that I'm not in need of re-reading.
If you're familiar with the air shocks that we're talking about, it's the airbags that fail. Not the shock. What makes the airbags fail is moisture - mostly inside the airbags. That's also influenced by temperature. There are slight differences between where the right front and left front air shocks are, slight differences in temperature.

I don't know where you get 2 years= 30,000 miles. At the rate I drive, that's crazy talk. Maybe 20k, but mileage has little to do with it anyway. You're assuming you are the reference for time = mileage I guess.
The fact is that you have relatively little experience and knowledge on the L322 (from reading some of your many responses, and seeing when you joined the forum), but offer your experience and opinions as experienced and factual.

I assume you will doubt and argue against what I'm talking about, and I'm fine with that. As I've grown older, I've noticed that new generations who have been taught to "question authority" and "question common conventions" doubt about everything until they're taken by the hand and shown.
The problem is that more & more of those that actually know things are growing weary of being questioned. As such more & more that know things decide to remain quiet rather than dealing with the new-age (for a few generations now) doubters.
And that that newest couple of generations have apparently been raised believing that they're inherently smart, great, and deserving of so much; and have a habit of asking for what they need and getting, rather than having to find for themselves on their own.
Which goes back to experienced posters searching existing posts & providing them to those that don't have time. Neither do those of us that don't have the problem in question.
Sad, but that's the way trends appear to be going; in general and in this and other forums.

So while there is so much info and experienced knowledge available, it seems to be fading away with those that discovered it in the first place little-by-little.
 
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