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Unless you've spun a bearing, I'd assume the cam bearings are fine, cant really be done easily since to do them right you want to get it line-bored when replacing the bearings. In terms of just replacing the cam, it's easily doable in-car, that's how I did mine. Just make sure to label all the wires and hoses!
zEXtNzBPTd+yX0dT5m03XQ.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
Nice picture. Thanks. Dont know if any bearing is spun or how to check. You didn't recondition the heads?

I was working on the main bearings after lunch. I have a 24v impact driver. Main bearings 2 and 3 bolts came out easy. Bolts on 1 and 4 and 5 dont budge. On 4, I broke my deep socket on the bolt with a 30" cheater bar. Afraid the bolt will break now. Wondering how to get them off... going to Harbor freight to get a impact rated socket next.

I called around to see who would/could rebuild the engine.. no one really wants to do that and none wants to deal with a RangeRover... they all just "replace engines" not repair. Too much liability..too much lack of knowledge apparently.

I found one capable shop in Killeen, TX that wants to do it... may end up there if the bolts dont pop. May take a torch to it next.

Did you do the bottom end bearings too? I guess not as I see the sump still in place...

Did you go the Wedge Shop route or with the standard cam?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Down the rabbit hole I go with the main bearings... While the engine in in the vehicle, if you remove the rear main bearing from the crack shaft, will it destroy the rear seal? It looks like it will in this picture and according to the RAVE manual, the seal is pressed into the cap before the bolts are torqued.

Has anybody done that before and is that what RoverMasterTech did in his bearing replacements, remove the rear bearing cap, replace the bearings, and just press the seal back into the bearing cap when it was torqued?

Page 123 of Range_Rover_Classic_Manual_1995.pdf:
 

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Yes I have done this. Removed the rear bearing cap, changed the shells and refitted cap on the old rear seal. It leaked a little before and it leaked a little after. Just try your hardest not to disturb the seal. You can try to change the T-seals (7) but it will make inserting the bearing cap a little bit more tricking - so possibly better not. Alternatively some sealant on the sides as well as the bottom (8).

Then a few years later and I changed the gearbox from auto to manual and with the flywheel removed I did the proper job and changes the rear seal and T-seals etc. Now it leaks even less (wet but but dripping)

The seal is pretty robust and sits pretty naturally in the groove.
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Just to add.. from what I recall when I installed the new seal, you are suppose to fit the seal and then install the cap so you never drive in the seal. With the flywheel removed you just have a better visual to make sure the seal is not sitting wonky - and obviously can change the seal only with the flywheel removed.
 

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Nice picture. Thanks. Dont know if any bearing is spun or how to check. You didn't recondition the heads?

I was working on the main bearings after lunch. I have a 24v impact driver. Main bearings 2 and 3 bolts came out easy. Bolts on 1 and 4 and 5 dont budge. On 4, I broke my deep socket on the bolt with a 30" cheater bar. Afraid the bolt will break now. Wondering how to get them off... going to Harbor freight to get a impact rated socket next.

I called around to see who would/could rebuild the engine.. no one really wants to do that and none wants to deal with a RangeRover... they all just "replace engines" not repair. Too much liability..too much lack of knowledge apparently.

I found one capable shop in Killeen, TX that wants to do it... may end up there if the bolts dont pop. May take a torch to it next.

Did you do the bottom end bearings too?

Did you go the Wedge Shop route or with the standard cam?
At this point I only did the cam, lifters, and timing set, didn't touch the heads or the bottom end. It was a temporary patch to try to claw back some lost power, but it didn't help much with such low compression. I eventually gave in and sprung for a top-hatted 4.6 build, so that solved those problems. In terms of cam, I chose a wedge shop cam (the "wedge shop 1" grind) which was supposed to give a good balance of mid range power and lower end torque, but due to the low compression I saw little improvement. A note about the wedge shop cam though, if you live in a smog nazi state like California (like me), that cam would never have passed emissions due to sound alone, it had an incredibly uneven/lopey idle (sounded quite good to be honest) that screamed "I am not stock". For my 4.6 build we went with a Crower cam (below) which gives good oomph over stock but still sounds like a stock motor.

 

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Discussion Starter #27
At this point I only did the cam, lifters, and timing set, didn't touch the heads or the bottom end. It was a temporary patch to try to claw back some lost power, but it didn't help much with such low compression. I eventually gave in and sprung for a top-hatted 4.6 build, so that solved those problems. In terms of cam, I chose a wedge shop cam (the "wedge shop 1" grind) which was supposed to give a good balance of mid range power and lower end torque, but due to the low compression I saw little improvement. A note about the wedge shop cam though, if you live in a smog nazi state like California (like me), that cam would never have passed emissions due to sound alone, it had an incredibly uneven/lopey idle (sounded quite good to be honest) that screamed "I am not stock". For my 4.6 build we went with a Crower cam (below) which gives good oomph over stock but still sounds like a stock motor.

My state inspection here in Texas is now irrelevant wrt the emissions since the vehicle is passing the 25 year anniversary and is NO longer required to have the emissions testing. YEA! Only a safety test for lights, horn, etc.. What a crock! The place I took it to a couple times in the past tried to fail me but never could on the dual speed idle test part of the emissions. Now not an issue.

I probably continue with my tear down today and see what progress I make.

Thanks for the update.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Yes I have done this. Removed the rear bearing cap, changed the shells and refitted cap on the old rear seal. It leaked a little before and it leaked a little after. Just try your hardest not to disturb the seal. You can try to change the T-seals (7) but it will make inserting the bearing cap a little bit more tricking - so possibly better not. Alternatively some sealant on the sides as well as the bottom (8).

Then a few years later and I changed the gearbox from auto to manual and with the flywheel removed I did the proper job and changes the rear seal and T-seals etc. Now it leaks even less (wet but but dripping)

The seal is pretty robust and sits pretty naturally in the groove.
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Dang. The inside of your engine looks new. Mine looks way more patina'd!
Good pics of the seal though. Much appreciated.
Mine has dripped too for years but never enough to change the oil level really, just enough to coat the underside and make it grimy. Maybe Ill get lucky.
 

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Where about in Texas? I am in Houston myself. Yes TX testing is a breeze, $7 and never a fail.

I recovered my Rover from a junkyard in Stafford (south Houston). 1983 with 37k miles. Taken off the road around '97 I am guessing dt a burnt out valve, engine partly dismantled by PO, then garage till the owner died in ~2017 and the junkyard got the car. It stood in their yard with engine partly disassembles as it was 'too nice to crush'. Then I found it and nursed it back to health.

Cheap to buy, but so cheap anymore now. Overall in very good condition, seems the PO (R.I.P.) took care of it.
 

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Where about in Texas? I am in Houston myself. Yes TX testing is a breeze, $7 and never a fail.

I recovered my Rover from a junkyard in Stafford (south Houston). 1983 with 37k miles. Taken off the road around '97 I am guessing dt a burnt out valve, engine partly dismantled by PO, then garage till the owner died in ~2017 and the junkyard got the car. It stood in their yard with engine partly disassembles as it was 'too nice to crush'. Then I found it and nursed it back to health.

Cheap to buy, but so cheap anymore now. Overall in very good condition, seems the PO (R.I.P.) took care of it.
Wow glad you saved it from a sad end! The testing jealously from over here is real.....full emissions testing required on anything post 1975, I've failed and had to retest at different times because (1) the gas cap rubber gasket had a crack in it (automatic fail, even though it passed the pressure test) or (2) the timing was 2 degrees off of stock, or (3) the rubber hose to the charcoal canister had a small crack, etc etc etc................The most annoying is the "visual" check, where even if your vehicle passes all the quantitative checks, the smog tech can fail you if he thinks something "looks" or "sounds" like it isn't stock, regardless of what the numbers say. It really highlights the importance of finding a guy/shop you like and building a rapport with them so they wont ding you for silly subjective stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Where about in Texas? I am in Houston myself. Yes TX testing is a breeze, $7 and never a fail.

I recovered my Rover from a junkyard in Stafford (south Houston). 1983 with 37k miles. Taken off the road around '97 I am guessing dt a burnt out valve, engine partly dismantled by PO, then garage till the owner died in ~2017 and the junkyard got the car. It stood in their yard with engine partly disassembles as it was 'too nice to crush'. Then I found it and nursed it back to health.

Cheap to buy, but so cheap anymore now. Overall in very good condition, seems the PO (R.I.P.) took care of it.
Now living in Taylor, TX. A short commute to north Austin when necessary to go to work at IBM. Post a picture of your ride when you have a chance. A 1983 vintage RR is rare I suppose. It amazing how they all look the same though. Range Rover 1980's - Range Rover Classic
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Wow glad you saved it from a sad end! The testing jealously from over here is real.....full emissions testing required on anything post 1975, I've failed and had to retest at different times because (1) the gas cap rubber gasket had a crack in it (automatic fail, even though it passed the pressure test) or (2) the timing was 2 degrees off of stock, or (3) the rubber hose to the charcoal canister had a small crack, etc etc etc................The most annoying is the "visual" check, where even if your vehicle passes all the quantitative checks, the smog tech can fail you if he thinks something "looks" or "sounds" like it isn't stock, regardless of what the numbers say. It really highlights the importance of finding a guy/shop you like and building a rapport with them so they wont ding you for silly subjective stuff.
California dreaming, so glad I’m not doing that amid the pandemic. I saw some crazy stuff going on there On YouTube. I so enjoy visiting San Diego to eat the buffet at Hotel Del Coronado during Thanksgiving! Looking forward to that again sometime.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
New picture here... after a Powerwashing.. There is a little scoring in the gear chamber.. but what would one expect after 25 years? I think at least 25 more years will not do much additional wear. Im planning on putting back the original oil pump gears as they have mated quite well with the housing.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Yes I have done this. Removed the rear bearing cap, changed the shells and refitted cap on the old rear seal. It leaked a little before and it leaked a little after. Just try your hardest not to disturb the seal. You can try to change the T-seals (7) but it will make inserting the bearing cap a little bit more tricking - so possibly better not. Alternatively some sealant on the sides as well as the bottom (8).

Then a few years later and I changed the gearbox from auto to manual and with the flywheel removed I did the proper job and changes the rear seal and T-seals etc. Now it leaks even less (wet but but dripping)

The seal is pretty robust and sits pretty naturally in the groove.
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I finally removed the exhaust manifolds.. that is a tricky procedure since you can't see half of the bolts easily and all the keeper tabs are hard to see too.

Did you end up reusing all the bearing cap bolts when you replace the bearings?

Did you pull the heads too and did you replace the exhaust manifold bolts too? The gasket set for the heads has bolts and manifold replacement gaskets but no bolts...wouldnt that be nice if it did?
 

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It was you that called it the rabbit hole right? So yes been there done that.

One head was removed and in the back when I got my car. I removed the other and had them professionally rebuild. Turned out the head that was still fitted had a burned out valve . They skimmed, cleaned then rebuild and checked for clearances which were all within spec.I fitted with new composite gaskets instead of the copper one. I bought a head stud set instead of using the bolts. Less risk of stripping. You are not supposed to torque the bottom set (furthest from the engine center line) to full torque. I also used the coated manifold gasket, rather than the aluminium one.

Yes I reused the bearing cap bolts and nuts. Torqued them to spec, but cheated with a little bit of loctite, just because in case..
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Beauteous. With only 37K miles on it the engine compartment is very nice..mine is extremely grimy.
I was reading around that studs are the way to go, a bit more pricey. Hope they can go on and I can get the heads back on with the motor in the vehicle. I see that ARP #124-4003 will work (similar to ARP #157-4301) with fewer studs.

The 4 rear bolts holding the heads now are NOT accessible with my impact driver, so I was considering using a cheater bar to remove them. Since Im not a full time mechanic Im hoping that will work and not break the bolts. Anybody have an opinion on that issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Project update and advice

Update:
I may have mentioned that the front of the truck is up on ramps.
I got the heads off the block with an impact socket and a cheater bar. Not bad but not easy. They are a few days away from being pick up from a guy with lots of experience working on LR head components. I received the WedgeShop cam, lifters and new springs. I've cleaned all the parts nicely and am looking into getting a soda blaster or a media blaster to give the aluminum a good shinning up before reassembly. I took the injectors to a local diesel shop to be professionally cleaned on their ultrasonic machine. Looking forward to that outcome in the next couple days. Im waiting on the main bearing parts to come. Those are apparently in VERY short supply so say the majors of the LR parts world. Those should be here this week!

Advice here:
I finally removed the radiator. I took it to rebuilder guy locally and he said junk it. $700+ for a rebuild was the low quote. Picts of it here. Looking for a decent replacement now. Any opinions of that one?
Does the airconditioning condenser need to be removed in order to swap the camshaft? The new cam is 21.5". The clearance from the block to the condenser is 15"... my runway does not seem near long enough. Any good sugestions on how to proceed with that too? When MasterRoverTech said to NOT over oil the bearings upon reinstall, what does that mean exactly. The bolts I have out already are in GOOD shape and are going back in.

Next steps:

Next step is to remove the main bearing caps and move onto push rods.
The bolts on 1,2 and 5 dont budge...now to get the breaker bar out again and hope the wheel chock holds while I twist the bolts out of the engine.

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