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Discussion Starter #1
After reading many forum posts wrt rebuilds and breakdowns, my favorite so far was from RoverMasterTech's writeup as follows: Main/Crank Bearing replacement write up - Land Rover Forums - Land Rover Enthusiast Forum
I believe that for me and my car, his insight and approach captures how I would like to approach my problem as follows. If anybody can please recommend and make pertinent suggestions Im all ears. Myself and the car are conditionally ready and willing to face the challenges that may come.

1995 RRC LWB:
~266,000 miles
Routine maintenance only after all this time...

Car is/was running "strong", no smoke, good gas mileage and handles fine, other than the tap, tap, tap and now the knock…

My local and knowledgeable LandRover "expert” mechanic team said I have rod knock in the bottom end. I hadn't really noticed because of the top end tap. Once he called it to my attention I do hear it.. (he said the exhaust manifold was leaking but I don't really notice it and that may be masking the knock somewhat.) They said catastrophe was eminent and the lead tech would NOT drive it further…that was after he put in the new Power steering pump and damper and test drove it for a spin.

He also said that the FRONT COVER was obsolete and that IF the oil pump had damaged the housing ( he was pretty sure it would be trashed) , then fixing anything was not an option, because even a block swap needed the old cover and those were impossible to find.

SO, I intend to pull the cover and inspect the PUMP and housing and keep a tight hold of the cover until I know it is not re-usable. ( Anyone hear of remanufacturing those? Why hasn't the part been resurrected ?)
IF cover is GOOD, then I will need gears to replace the pump , the timing chain kit, pickup tube o-ring, gaskets, etc … water pump is new but "TWO LONG bolts on driver side lower" threads stripped as I was torquing them in the cover for sure.
Also, before doing the pump/timing chain job, iff COVER is good I will inspect lower bearings and replace ( mains and pushrod) if the Crankshaft/Journals are not out of spec.
If crank appears trashed or bearings walked, then Ill pull the engine and have it rebuilt somewhere near Austin, TX or send it away or locate a rebuilt… ANY SUGGESTIONS on other local experts, options?

I Will need plastigage to inspect the crankshaft? (will that work on old beings or Do you need new to check??)

How does that sound?
Thanks in advance for your help.

Other plan is put it back together, and sell it as is to someone who wants the challenge. Minimal rust and never wrecked. Typical issues but nothing major.

P.S. If someone had said at 160K miles to rebuild the pump I would have for sure, but I never considered it and Bill never suggested it. I was happy to have an incredibly reliable automobile that never left me stranded and always started. I truly wonder about the horror stories I read on this site wrt money pit rovers. Mine never was and 266K miles later I know Ive spend more on gas than what I paid for it easily.
 

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Do you now why they seem to believe the oil pump housing in the front cover is trashed? I find that unlikely, and while they are very difficult to find, unless it sustained some form of unusual damage you can probably just replace the oil pump gears, that's what I did. To be honest 266k out of a rover motor without a rebuild is pretty damned impressive. A fresh bottom end and good care should give you another 250k!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Do you now why they seem to believe the oil pump housing in the front cover is trashed? I find that unlikely, and while they are very difficult to find, unless it sustained some form of unusual damage you can probably just replace the oil pump gears, that's what I did. To be honest 266k out of a rover motor without a rebuild is pretty damned impressive. A fresh bottom end and good care should give you another 250k!
The shop said they had experience with looking at similar age '95 LWBs and that was what to expect, 50/50 chance. I've not read any post that said the gears had torn up the cover but I would be interested to hear more. I know of one other shop that did my viscous couple exchange 7 years ago and I may speak with them too. Thanks for the comment.
 

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It’s a 266k mile long block, run it till it blows up and find a good replacement. Only thing worth anything in a 4.2 is the crank, and that’s if it’s good.

4.6 out of a P38 with pinned sleeves and refreshed heads would be a good and cheap upgrade.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Other than the current question of fixing the 4.2 to get more life, does anyone know of write-ups on the forum on how that would go, putting a p38 engine into a '95 RRC? Which specific year(s) would one consider as the best option to attempt? That option is getting off target of my current problem but sounds like a decent approach if its cost effective...and I can do.
 

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Maybe at this stage the most cost effective solution might be source a different car and either drive that or transplant the engine over yourself, assuming you current car is really nice and worth it and you have the facility and experience to do it yourself (not terribly difficult). The P38 engine being the largest bore of the rover V8 Buick engine is probably more likely to have a liner issue than say a 3.8 or 4.2 extracted from a working vehicle. If you get it wrong it can be a real money pit.
 

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Unless you find a 94-95 D1 a parts car isn’t worth it. A bucket of rust disguised as a RRC is worth 5 grand unless you’re waiting months and months for somebody who doesn’t know what they have.

Early GEMS 4.6 P38s have the best blocks of any big bore Rover V8. 3.9, 4.0, 4.2 and 4.6 all have the same bore. Use motors made from 1995-1998, they’ll have a manifold that looks like yours. Later engines have a manifold that looks like a pasta bowl.

You need a $30 crank spacer and a new cam suitable for distributor engines you can find at the wedge shop. Otherwise dress it up like your old engine and you’re good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Do you need these tools? The front cover timing chain job has special tools Listed at step 7.
LocatetoolLRT-12-090ontimingcoverandoil pump drive gear.
8. Positiontimingcovertocylinderblockandat the same time, rotate tool LRT-12-090 until drive gear keyway is aligned with Woodruff key.

and for the seal,

13. FittimingcoveroilsealusingtoolLRT-12-089.
14. Fitcrankshaftpulley,fitboltandspacer
washer; tighten bolt to correct torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Ive never taken apart a RRC engine but have a 1976 Ford F250 extended cab big bore, all the way to the rebuild shop.

I saw this interesting way to remove the crankshaft pulley bolt... Crankshaft Pulley Bolt removal, post #4, by getlost4x4: "
24 mm socket on a breaker bar on the driverside frame rail. unhook the fuel pump relay. pop the starter. bamn, done and done. very easy to do."

That does sound easy... anybody else do it that way?
I noticed the radiator is in the way to remove it with a battery powered impact hammer...and a 2x4 against the crankshaft counterweight moves the entire car when braced on the garage's floor..

Fast forward. The tear down has been very easy, but messy. Every
time I remove a pipe or tube coolant or oil oozes out.. nice.

I got the crankshaft bolt off very easily with a small wood wedge in the bearing berth on cylinder 8 crankshaft counter balance. I'd never use the start to remove the crankshaft bolt like that...scary.

I had driven the RRC up on metal ramps... then I learned that the extra height was great to scoot around under the engine, but the wheels and axles are still in the same location relative to the engine as when it was on the ground. My dad came over and we used a small piston jack to raise the frame (under the radiator on the metal cross frame member) to make enough clearance to pull out the oil sump...just a little made all the difference. Very easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Removed the timing chain cover from my RRC grease trap. The chain has a lot of deflection after 260K+ miles, no doubt. My concern all along has been the oil pump and its place in the cover. Upon inspection I dont see a thing wrong... any concerns you guys see? I've seem several post which show cracked gears. I think the gear look fine. Why replace them is what I wonder, since I know they've held up all this time, and new ones may just break. I can use the tolerances specified in the overhaul manual.
IMG_20200517_180909.jpg
 

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The oil pump gears look fine to me. If you intend to re-build/freshen up this motor, I highly recommend replacing the timing chain and gears since you're there, chain slack means poor timing, and the original nylon gears will not last forever. I'd recommend a good cloyes double roller timing set (not that expensive). It wont ever stretch, and the all-steel gears wont crack or start to slip on their hub like the factory nylon ones can. Mine had a lot of slack too, and the new set went on pretty easily.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Great to hear that. Ill look into the Cloyes double roller timing set.

What do you think about my UFO? I posted a picture of something I found in the sump in another thread.

I intend on inspecting the bearing.. but wonder how far to go... plastigage, etc...

My inclination from MasterRoverTech is to replace bearings (both main and pushrod) as that is the demise of oil pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
On my recent post of the oil pump and cover, I forgot to mention that there was no relief valve spring and piston in the cover. Is that normal too?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The oil pump gears look fine to me. If you intend to re-build/freshen up this motor, I highly recommend replacing the timing chain and gears since you're there, chain slack means poor timing, and the original nylon gears will not last forever. I'd recommend a good cloyes double roller timing set (not that expensive). It wont ever stretch, and the all-steel gears wont crack or start to slip on their hub like the factory nylon ones can. Mine had a lot of slack too, and the new set went on pretty easily.
There is no "good cloyes double roller timing set" available from what I could search for a 1995 Range Rover.. darn it!
 

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There is no "good cloyes double roller timing set" available from what I could search for a 1995 Range Rover.. darn it!

Might as well put a new cam in there while you’re at it.

 

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I will second the new cam suggestion, when I replaced mine in my old 3.9, a couple of the lobes were almost worn completely round, virtually no lift at all!
 

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You said there was no relief valve spring or piston in the front cover, was the hole just empty, or was there a plug? Mine is the older v-belt front cover with the cam-driven oil pump, so the design is a bit different.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
As the picture shows there is nothing in hole.. so I guess it didn't come with one because Im the only owner since 1997...and Ive never had the timing cover off.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I will second the new cam suggestion, when I replaced mine in my old 3.9, a couple of the lobes were almost worn completely round, virtually no lift at all!
I haven't the inclination to pull the engine and will pull the heads and take them somewhere to be reconditioned.

Did you also replace the cam bearings and is that even possible/manageable with the engine in the vehicle?

There was a broken off part in the oil intake ( I think it was the tip end of a valve) so the heads obviously need some tlc.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
In the beginning of the thread I said that my inspiration for the bearing replacement was MasterRoverTech's job. IN his post it looks like he pulled all the mains first and then the pushrods, but I dont see that the mains were off at the same time as the rod bearings.
My timing chain is stretch and is getting replaced.
Is there a particular order of events to adhere to wrt the bearings? I was thinking that the mains should go first and be refitted, then work on the pushrods. Then lastly, pull the heads, pull the cam, and redo those parts.
 
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