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2016-2018 Range Rover MkIV / L405
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Discussion Starter #1
Guys,

This weekend I had installed a set of BF Goodrich KO2 275/55R20s on the Rover. Overall fairly happy. I read most of the reviews on these tires across the RRS/RR forums. Having put a 150 miles on them yesterday I feel like the reviews had me about 90% mentally prepared for the switch. For the on-road handling, as many reported, the cornering is much sloppier. Especially noticeable in the steering wheel at highway speeds. It's just not as instantaneous of a response as the OEM tires. Still very livable. The biggest downside of these tires is a slight road noise "hum", most noticeable between 30-70 on a concrete highways. Much less noticeable on asphalt, at low speeds, or once you get to 80 (possible due to some harmonics). Its not like mud tires on a jeep that sound like bi-plane coming down the road but there is a definite hum. That said with any radio on its truly unnoticeable. I think as these wear down and edges become a little rounder it will diminish some.

I will be taking the rover off-road next weekend to Peter Mills Gap to test their performance on rock and mud.

JD
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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63 Posts
Guys,

This weekend I had installed a set of BF Goodrich KO2 275/55R20s on the Rover. Overall fairly happy. I read most of the reviews on these tires across the RRS/RR forums. Having put a 150 miles on them yesterday I feel like the reviews had me about 90% mentally prepared for the switch. For the on-road handling, as many reported, the cornering is much sloppier. Especially noticeable in the steering wheel at highway speeds. It's just not as instantaneous of a response as the OEM tires. Still very livable. The biggest downside of these tires is a slight road noise "hum", most noticeable between 30-70 on a concrete highways. Much less noticeable on asphalt, at low speeds, or once you get to 80 (possible due to some harmonics). Its not like mud tires on a jeep that sound like bi-plane coming down the road but there is a definite hum. That said with any radio on its truly unnoticeable. I think as these wear down and edges become a little rounder it will diminish some.

I will be taking the rover off-road next weekend to Peter Mills Gap to test their performance on rock and mud.

JD
Looking forward to the results off-road!
 

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Very cool thanks so much for posting, and do let us know the results!

Also have you noticed any difference in ride quality -- ie softer or harsher?

Cheers

John
 

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2016-2018 Range Rover MkIV / L405
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
@ranger4 I have been keeping them at 37lbs so I haven't noticed much ride quality differences. I have read at 42-44 there are much harsher.
 

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2016-2018 Range Rover MkIV / L405
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Discussion Starter #5
Just got back from an offroad trip in Virginia this morning. Went 50 miles offroad after it was raining all weekend. This trail is fairly mild but a few sections with steep loose climbs or drops. I can say I didn't slip once with the Ko2s. The trail was really rocky as well with lots of sharp shale etc. No tire puncture issues (we aired down to 32lbs). Overall on road has been fine. Im getting very used to them.

IMG_0217.JPG IMG_0218.JPG IMG_0219.JPG IMG_0222.JPG IMG_0226.JPG
 

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Nice to see you're enjoying your KO2's. I love seeing photos like that! They do give a lot more confidence when going over sharp rocks. 3-ply sidewalls. And since they have a mountain snowflake rating, you might avoid using winter tires.

I'm on my 2nd set of KO2's. I agree with all of your comments. Handling is affected, but fortunately, straight line tracking is still pretty effortless. No wander. Anyway you do get used to it--and I'm sensitive to this kind of thing. It's just a tradeoff so that you can go anywhere without changing the tires for a trip. The ride itself does seem relatively unaffected.

Regarding the looser handling, I think the biggest reason is the deep "siping" on these tires. It helps them perform in snow and rocks, but steering corrections need to go thru all of the siping cut into the deep tread blocks. You'll find that generally lower tire pressures will handle better due to a larger contact patch. Just for testing, you can increase the pressure way up (tires are rated for a lot more psi) and prove that the handling gets very sloppy indeed. I usually run mine a little above the standard Range Rover light load pressures. Mileage will be slightly affected vs. normal tires.

As you break in the tires, they will improve. Maybe the siping doesn't slip as much. And as you wear them out, they will keep improving as the tread blocks wear down.
 
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