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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

As the title states, I am in the market for a RRS and have a couple questions for everyone.

I am looking at the 08-09 vintage, but may be interested in 2010 and up depending on how serious the timing chain issue is.

1. Does the 08-09 suffer from the diff problem that the 06 and 07 does? I found a couple post that stated it had been fixed by then, but then I found a post about someone having to replace diffs in an 09.
2. Is the timing chain issue on the 2010 and up a common failure? I read a post that it was fixed by 2012. I am just wondering if anyone has better details on failure rates.
3. I vacillate between getting an NA RRS vs a supercharged RRS. On one hand I believe Dave posted that he thought the supercharged engine was built better. I believe he said something about the internals being stronger. The SC also has the more expensive sway bar bushing correct? Does the SC come with adaptive lighting? That is a very spendy fix as well. Also, the cone bearing is a maintence item correct? Every 60k?
4. Rather than dealing with EAS issues all the time, I would be interested in swaping in coilovers. What is everyones thoughts on this?

Best regards,

Justin
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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208 Posts
I have a 2012 RRS SC & had my cars timing chain changed at 60,000 km (around 37,000 miles) or so under warranty. They changed the design of the pulley's in 2013.
The 2010 + RRS non-SC have the same power as the 2008-2009 SC versions.
The Supercharger was also apparently redesigned in 2013. Thus, I have an older version of the supercharger that will need to be changed at some stage I suppose.

That being said - I am buying mine out at lease end. I HATE the look of the 2014+ & am willing to buy a new supercharger when & if required. I love my supercharged 2012 & am keeping it!
 

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Justin, every year make and model of every car has at least one "design" issue lurking about. Every car will have a fault blown out of proportion on the internet and newbies like you will fall for the negative hype.

1: jsut because a couple people changed a diff in 09s does not make it an issue. It makes it a failure and could have been for any number of reasons. Early SPorts had issues with the finish on the diffs fouling the fluid... not a big deal to have a diff changed and can hardly be a reason for not buying a nice example.

2: Not a common issue. THere are no details on failure rates. If one fails it is usually because people ignore symptoms. Timing chains to not simply let go and fail. Again, common sense prevails

3: If you are splitting a desicision on something basic and cheap like bushings or a bearing I can;t help but think you are looking at the wrong vehicles.

4: Are you serious? THis is where you will have lost most people here. You;ve obviously bought into the negative hype and don;t know the facts. It's like fearing your A/C failing so you rip it out and mount a 12v fan to your dash for added cooling.

Again I can;t help but think you are looking at entirely the wrong vehicles for your ideas of maintenance or repairs. It sounds like you want the Range Rover name with the perceived reliability of a Toyota. Most people never have issues with the Range Rovers outside of wear items. YES EAS is a wear item... you maintain it, you deal with it jsut like you do brakes, tyres, radiators, water pumps....
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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What's your budget taxes IN?


Oh, and I agree with Toadhall. You've obviously been creeping this forum and doing your research but know that these cars are complex. You buy a Honda and OF COURSE you're going to have less problems, IT'S A HONDA. It has a body, an engine, a drive train and wheels. That's pretty much it. These cars are MUCH MUCH MORE so as the old saying goes "there's more to fix".

It's not that these cars are problematic, but more that they are complex so you need to stay on top of maintenance to keep things running smooth. If that's a deal breaker for you, get a Honda.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Justin, every year make and model of every car has at least one "design" issue lurking about. Every car will have a fault blown out of proportion on the internet and newbies like you will fall for the negative hype.

1: jsut because a couple people changed a diff in 09s does not make it an issue. It makes it a failure and could have been for any number of reasons. Early SPorts had issues with the finish on the diffs fouling the fluid... not a big deal to have a diff changed and can hardly be a reason for not buying a nice example. Agreed. They likely did not change diff oil every 30k.

2: Not a common issue. THere are no details on failure rates. If one fails it is usually because people ignore symptoms. Timing chains to not simply let go and fail. Again, common sense prevails.To me this depends on failure. If the chain failed because of stretch that is not okay. If the chain failed because the guides broke and the person did not replace the guides then yes, that is negligence. Still guides should not be failing on a rig with less than 100k.

3: If you are splitting a desicision on something basic and cheap like bushings or a bearing I can;t help but think you are looking at the wrong vehicles. While the DSC bushings are not expensive the labor to change them is, verses a normal sway bar bushing. I am not sure about the cone bearing.

4: Are you serious? THis is where you will have lost most people here. You;ve obviously bought into the negative hype and don;t know the facts. It's like fearing your A/C failing so you rip it out and mount a 12v fan to your dash for added cooling. All air suspensions fail, even Lexus. I see no reason why not to swap in coil overs to get away from costly repairs. I have no problem with the way a vehicle rides on coils.

Again I can;t help but think you are looking at entirely the wrong vehicles for your ideas of maintenance or repairs. It sounds like you want the Range Rover name with the perceived reliability of a Toyota. Most people never have issues with the Range Rovers outside of wear items. YES EAS is a wear item... you maintain it, you deal with it jsut like you do brakes, tyres, radiators, water pumps....
​I don't see how a radiator is a wear item. I would replace at 100k as preventive maintenance though, along with water pump and thermostat.
 

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My 2008 (non SC) seems faster than my porsche 911. REALLY!
I do keep ALL maintenance up-to-date per the owner's manual. So it is virtually trouble-free. (Except for dead battery recently, which even prevents key from turning, so seemed like a big issue to me.)

But otherwise, great vehicle, still turns heads, runs feels like new, and I do drive it fast. I don't abuse the engine or drive train in any way, but will drive it 70- 90 mph on interstates all the time. 80,000 mi. and running perfect
 

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4: The term is CASTRATION. Very few enthusiasts castrate their rigs as it removes so many of the features that help give Range Rovers their character, flexibility and capabilities.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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I am completely new to this forum, but your post suggests that repairs might be a financial problem. As I continue to read and gather information, these vehicles cost more than average, and repair costs are more than average. A friend drives a Countach....every 10,000 miles he has an engine out maintenance done. It is pricey, but driving his Countach has rewards.

3. adaptive lighting: I thought that was an option in the Vision Assist Package? If it concerns you, do not purchase one with that package.

Supercharger: I have a motorcycle with a supercharger with no problems. Also had a car with a supercharger and no problems (sold with 40K). On the SC Rovers, the oil is supposed to be serviced every 50K (?). I suspect many do not perform this service.
 
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