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Discussion Starter #1
i know its been done before and I think the only thread I found on someone doing it was Jos so thanks for the idea `) ....grabbed a used track rod and drag link at the pick and pull for ten bucks...cut the ends, cut mine, welded the adjustable ends on mine and 72 bucks later all new rod ends and no more sloppy steering/walking. I alligned it the best i could and so far i only seem to have lost a slight bit of turning radius to the right. everything else I am super happy with...and NO stamped rod ends!


Also, found a steering stabilizer for a stock dodge 2500 that fit almost perfect with minor modification.

I will try to post some more pics of the installed end product in addition to these....pardon the ugly mig welds....but they are strong!! `)
thanks for more help guys! heim 1.jpg heim 2.jpg
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I would never do any welding on steering parts. Just my opinion.
 

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I would never do any welding on steering parts. Just my opinion.
How do you think they make 'em in the first place? I'd want to be pretty happy with my weld penetration though...
 

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Gordon,

We are talking here about amateur welding of steering parts. Steering parts welded as part of the manufacturing process will have proper design calculations done. The welding will be automated in factory conditions and maybe stress relief will be used. The metallurgy will be correct. Parts will also be regularly tested.

Amateur welding is a whole different ball game on a part as critical as steering. Weld penetration, slag inclusion and use of the correct welding rods is critical. A high tensile part could be seriously compromised by welding. How can you gauge if the part is OK? By visual inspection? Not sufficient.

In amateur motor sports, both cars and motorcycles, welding of steering parts is not allowed for this very reason.

I fabricate parts for my car, I have both an arc welder and a MIG welder, but non critical parts. Welding on steering (or brake parts for that matter) would be a step too far imho.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
FYI I am 6G TIG aluminum certified. I have been TIGing aluminum core chassis, wakeboard towers, exo skeletons, and legends race car chassis for over 8 years....so we're not talking here about amateur welding of steering parts. although I do understand your concern if that were the case ;) .

fyi, we split the old track rod and doubled it on both sides of our vgrinded butt welds and put 170 through it to make sure it ....stuck. just in case I bump a rock or something.
 

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dave3d - I think you're overestimating how much thought goes into the manufacture of cheap, mass-produced automotive parts.
 
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