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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Talk about bad timing ... the original ignition amp module went out while I was about an hour out from civilization in the coastal jungles of El Salvador near Punta Mango. Somehow I squeaked a little more life out of the unit enough to get the car started (1995 RRC 4.2L) by jumpering the unit and sending current straight to where the IAM feeds into the distributor (only to start her up then jumper was removed).... my IAM has been relocated just to the left of the radiator BTW. Ran great at first, but by the time I reached town it was limping HARD, power cutting in and out.

Confirmed I'm getting zero current through the module and now need to find the part locally or research using a GM IAM instead ... can't find definitive info on using a GM unit instead as I'm guessing I'll have a real hard time finding an original down here.

Any recommendations on replacement parts for this would be greatly appreciated! Not sure how long the girlfriend will survive in this tiny little coastal town! Ha. Fun times.

One last bit of news. I think the problem with the failure was due to a new radiator install which was slightly larger than stock and is dangerously close to the module (literally touching the rubber connector which goes through the heat sink). So I'll be looking at relocating this crippling little part once I find that replacement!
 

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You can use a gm module
Should be easy to find one there
They are the ones from the 70s
I used to have a link for wireing
but lost it they look like these
Good luck
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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try motores británicos, 503-227-80097, located in antiguo custatlan la libertad. you have land rover club de el salvador, not sure exactly were they are based all I know they are in san salvador, avenida cuscatlan I think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You guys rock. Thanks for the info on the 4 wire GM version.. this is what I'll focus on finding for the time being.

I also did reach out to the Land Rover club... they are asking around as well. Very helpful guys!
 

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Your welcome
And best of luck
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Fortunately I got a new Bearmach amp module as exactly specified for my Rangie (shipped from San Salvador). Unfortunately it wasn't the fix. So I decided to stop flying by the seat of my pants and go back to the RAVE manual.

The next failure according to RAVE was the grounding bolt test on the ignition amp module. This is suppose to be reading 0.1V or less and I was getting 0.23V. I jumpered an improvised ground to this bolt and got it below 0.1V. Still wasn't the problem.

The next failure according to the RAVE was my coil reading 10V between the positive of the battery and the negative of the coil. Calling a Rangie shop back in So Cal the guy told me that was indicative of a bad coil. So I spent the next 6 hours and $140 finding a Bosch coil in El Salvador... brought the new coil back and STILL am getting 10V between the positive battery and negative coil. So I'm guessing a new coil was not the fix. I love how RAVE tells you when something is a problem but not what that problem may be... guessing because it could be one of a hundred things.

Anyways, so here I am STILL in nowhere El Salvador and still have no clue what to try next. I would really appreciate some help as we're getting pretty desperate. I guess if I can't troubleshoot this by Monday I'll pay the price to be towed all the way to San Salvador. I don't think the girlfriend is too stoked about visiting the homicide capital of the world for a little Rangie RnR.

If you send a suggestion which requires obtaining a new part PLEASE be confident in your opinion and realize it takes me 6 hours - 2 days to track down any basic Rangie part out here. I know troubleshooting the ignition electrical on these cars is a total crapshoot, but please just keep that in mind!

Luckily today we were towed out of the mud pit which we've been working and wallowing in every day (photo attached). Has rained every day here since the car broke down. So sometimes there's a silver lining to the day here :/
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bump for still being stuck in the jungle while all you are preparing for happy hour drinks and a night on the couch :p
 

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you're running out of ignition components to replace, as you have replaced nearly all major components. make sure you have the correct battery voltage, check your pick up coil (the unit inside the distributor) for proper operation.
both coil and pick up coil will emulate your original concern of cut off but eventually restart just enough to make your grin until it cuts again.
make sure all your connectors are dry and well engaged as well as free of ANY corrosion, you're in tropical weather it is always humid, this humidity exerberates any minor or mild electrical failure (we know rovers are not the best withe electronics).
I am native of said land and I know the weather is not ideal this time of year.
contact Miguel Martinez with the local land rover club, this guys are well versed on locating parts and good local shops and mechanics, they have a network of assistance both underground and pubic.
 

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I think you're stranded in PLAYA EL CUCO, in SAN MIGUEL, enjoy the surf it is listed as one of the top 10 surfing beaches in the world.
if you can visit san miguel, along carretera panamericana near ISSS there are some repair shops maybe worth a visit. in the city on 3rd or tercera avenida and carretera panamericana you will have taller mecanico BAIRES they used to have a tow truck.
also in san miguel on the other side of the city on ruta militar you have TALLER HERMANOS CLAROS.
also in the city on 9th street or novena calle, you have a shop which specializes in vehicle electronics it is know as TALLER EL PAJARO.
this may be worth a shot before the whole tow issue to san salvador, on quinta avenida sur you have TALLER AUTOMOTRIS BURGOS, not sure if your spanish is fluent but TALLER means shop.
it is unknown if this guys speak english altho english is spoken by many natives (said case your best option may be san salvador)
also be aware where ever you go, you will be seen as the chicken who laid the golden egg, you're driving an american tagged vehicle, you're an american and if you speak limited to no spanish...well you're on a third world country, do the math...

BTW, I would have contacted the us embassy by now....lol just for your safety. personally I hold dual citizenship but even when in my native homeland the first thing to do is contact the us embassy.
not trying to scare you just being forth coming and realistic about being a stranded tourist on a third world country.
Carlos...
 

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from the way it sounds... im thinking it has to be in the wireing..it has happened to my 92 severial times... like the wireing to spark modulator was broken....broken wire at the coil... stuff like that....my modul;ator is relacated and the ground is important..but i have no answer... and being down there i feel for ya...i used to travel in mexico and drive all over the country....but i wouldnt do it now.... adventure is a good thing...
and took a better look at you camper mod....awsome....
mike
 

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... my IAM has been relocated just to the left of the radiator BTW.
I suffered a failing IAM last year, and decided to relocate the new module. The relocation kit instructions were wrong for a 1995 RRC, and with the wiring wrong I suffered exactly the no-start symptoms and circular test procedures you are experiencing. The net effect of the wiring error was no signal to the ECU/injectors circuit.

I suggest a thorough inspection of all wiring to/from the relocation kit. Make sure the screws securing the dummy module on the distributor are tight, and be 100% sure you do not have a broken wire hidden anywhere in the IAM loom. I do think it's is IAM-related, it just may/may not be the actual IAM.

I also purchase IAM's in pairs for obvious reasons.
 

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I suffered a failing IAM last year, and decided to relocate the new module. The relocation kit instructions were wrong for a 1995 RRC, and with the wiring wrong I suffered exactly the no-start symptoms and circular test procedures you are experiencing. The net effect of the wiring error was no signal to the ECU/injectors circuit.

I suggest a thorough inspection of all wiring to/from the relocation kit. Make sure the screws securing the dummy module on the distributor are tight, and be 100% sure you do not have a broken wire hidden anywhere in the IAM loom. I do think it's is IAM-related, it just may/may not be the actual IAM.

I also purchase IAM's in pairs for obvious reasons.
on the 95 the factory had relocated the module, that is why relocation instructions do not match the vehicle. what TOM and MIKIE suggest is what I mentioned on my last ramble/post, check ALL your IGNITION wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks all. I've checked ALL wiring. Really think it is a problem internal to the distributor. I am trying to understand how the ignition pulse is created and sent from the distributor to the coil. If I'm getting no pulse from the distributor, which parts have most likely failed and is it possible to just replace a portion of the distributor that creates and sends the pulse or the entire unit. Seems like all other functions of the distributor are fine and has passed all other tests.

As for the embassy... I've been in far deeper trouble than this in foreign countries. Safe and sound... just need real help. Luckily I am getting a lot of help from the LR club down here. Should have a real mechanic out here Monday. Time has come to hang up my volt meter.
 

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Thanks all. I've checked ALL wiring. Really think it is a problem internal to the distributor. I am trying to understand how the ignition pulse is created and sent from the distributor to the coil. If I'm getting no pulse from the distributor, which parts have most likely failed and is it possible to just replace a portion of the distributor that creates and sends the pulse or the entire unit. Seems like all other functions of the distributor are fine and has passed all other tests.

As for the embassy... I've been in far deeper trouble than this in foreign countries. Safe and sound... just need real help. Luckily I am getting a lot of help from the LR club down here. Should have a real mechanic out here Monday. Time has come to hang up my volt meter.
yes the internal part of the distributor is what is called the pick up coil or distributor base plate atlantic british part #STC 2898, it works on a hall effect trigger. rovers north shows it in stock a/b website tells it will be back soon.
with amplifier module disconnected your ohm meter should read between 2k and 5k ohms when the teeth pass by the coil as the dizzy turns.
in the case of a 95 which should have the amplifier relocated and you have stated it is, just disconnect the pig tail at distributor and check. if out of range, of course it fails.
the instructions are on section 86 of the rave, electrical right after the alarm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I did go through that section in the RAVE. I got 3k ohms but didn't make sure the dizzy was in any particular position. Was this sufficient? Or how do I ensure the dizzy is in the correct position? RAVE doesn't mention a thing about positioning.... Thanks!
Had some local mechanic who was trying to convince me this was the problem today. I had to take the tools physically out of his hand before he started tearing apart the distributor to check the pick-up ... was 2 minutes away from having a timing issue on top of everything else :/
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Also, please correct me if I'm wrong. But the dizzy sends the rotation information through the pick-up, out to the ignition amp module and into the coil which then sends spark to the top of the dizzy?

That sound correct?
 

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Yes you are correct, the small rotor with eight metal pins in it swings past the static trigger and generates a pulse for each event (think it's called "hall effect" triggering) this very low level voltage switch sends a signal to the ignition amplifier which uses the timing pulse to switch the coil on and off with a heavier duty transistor switch circuit.
The coil output then travels down the HT lead to the distributor rotor arm which is, during the switch timing, pointed at the correct output lead for whichever cylinder needs to fire.
In essence you have the top, first level inside the dis as a layer of high tension high voltage arrangements, and the next level down is a low voltage low resistance switching. Obviously the timing as a whole is connected via the dis spindle but they are is essence two separate but related systems integrated into the dis.
 

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just wondering and im not being a smart a--
but have you tried turning the distributor while someone cranks the motor...
and have you tried starter fluid to start it...
when i cant get spark or get it to hit with starter fluid....i loosen the distributor and start turning it in small incrament till i get it to fire...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yes you are correct, the small rotor with eight metal pins in it swings past the static trigger and generates a pulse for each event (think it's called "hall effect" triggering) this very low level voltage switch sends a signal to the ignition amplifier which uses the timing pulse to switch the coil on and off with a heavier duty transistor switch circuit.
The coil output then travels down the HT lead to the distributor rotor arm which is, during the switch timing, pointed at the correct output lead for whichever cylinder needs to fire.
In essence you have the top, first level inside the dis as a layer of high tension high voltage arrangements, and the next level down is a low voltage low resistance switching. Obviously the timing as a whole is connected via the dis spindle but they are is essence two separate but related systems integrated into the dis.
Thanks for this. Just how I suspected things worked but needed to get back to basics after having my mind wrapped around this for too long.

So it seems like my biggest issue and head scratcher is why I would be getting +11V from the battery positive to the coil negative at all times (ignition off and ignition on) ... swapped coils and same issue.

OR

Is there another way to test the dizzy pick-up more than the 2-5k ohm test. In other words, is it possible to be in range but still have a failed pick-up? Should I look for the actual pulse leaving the dizzy rather than rely on the ohm test?
 
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