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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I hope you can help me make up my mind. I currently have a 2007 Toyota Tundra. I love the truck and it has never giving me any troubles. The truck has 144,000 miles on it.

My parents currently have a 2012 RR Sport with 75,000 miles on it. They have never had any problems with it except the electronic lift gate acts up from time to time. They are anal about routine maintenance and always use premium gas.

Part of me really wants to buy the Range Rover Sport from them. I have always thought range rovers are the sexiest things on the road. I’m just worried now that it is out of warranty and I hear stories about the cost of the parts that starts to break once a Range Rover starts to get close to 100k.

I do realize my truck could break down tomorrow and be costly since it is getting up there in miles. But what would y’all do? I have a baby on the way this year and I want something comfortable and reliable. As much as I want the RR Sport I want to make sure I am making the smartest decision.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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the back seat is really tiny for car seats. especially when the second is on the way. def not a family car. i also have a RRS and a 335 convertible as our family cars, so you can make it work just a struggle.
 

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Definitely not going to be as reliable as a Toyota - and will cost a lot more to fix - having said that - the sport is more of the more reliable landrover models - and if you diy - parts and repairs can be reasonable. If you have the 5.0 liter do. Forum search for engine timing chain issues ......
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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We've had our 2011 for a few years now, and it's really been pretty reliable. I will say that I still have much more faith in my 2000 4runner as far as reliability and cost of ownership. Sometimes I dread the call from my wife telling me what the dash says. However, like Alpaca says, the Sports are really proving to be one of the better LR models. Check the VIN number against the bulletin I'm posting below. It might help you with your decision. Somewhere in the 2012 MY LR made a revision to the timing chain tensioners to correct a design flaw. If yours falls after the cutoff, then I'd say go for it. If not, the eventual repair is very costly if you can't DIY. There is a class action lawsuit, but I don't know where it stands. Some folks have reported estimates north of $5k to fix.

One other biggie is the ACE anti-sway bars. If I were you, I'd spend the couple hundred bux and have a LR dealership or trusted mechanic that knows these trucks to look and see if those bars are leaking anywhere. No known fix for the seals other than full replacement. The part is $1500 for OEM and requires at least a partial body off chassis removal to replace. You do the math on what a shop would want for that.

Those are the 2 that lurk the most in the back of my mind.

Pic of the bulletin and link to full TSB

Timing Chain Service Bulletin
 

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In terms of comfort my 2012 RRS is incredible, it's so quiet and luxurious to drive. If your parents have looked after it, that's great, it's a real comfort to know that the car you've bought has been well looked-after. As with any car on the road, it could develop a problem, and as with any luxury car on the road they can be expensive to fix. The thing is, there's a lot of doom and gloom in the forums about repair costs and stuff but realistically, it's an 8 year old car - there are plenty of parts, and plenty more mechanics who know how to work on these cars. If something breaks on a machine that you love, just get it fixed. I don't regret getting mine, just make sure you look after it as well as you possibly can and it will do you good.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thank you for the replies. I really do want it. I drove it around for a few days and it was incredible. When I got back into my truck it was like I was driving a tractor now.

the timing chain definitely has me worried. You here people say it has to be done and it will most likely be around 100k miles and then you hear other people say if you maintain it properly and change the oil ever 5k miles then it could be fine way into the 100k mile mark. I know they always serviced the vehicle at the dealership but the dealership told them one year or 15k mile service interval. So I know that’s been happening for the last 70k miles.

is the timing chain really that common?
 

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It's a wear and tear part, it will go eventually. Like anything though there are a million and one factors to how long it will last. It's part of a system, so if any part of the system breaks it could damage the chain, or the chain could just develop a weakness and go.

The reality is that you may even put a brand new chain on which has a defect and breaks within a week.

If you get the oil changed every 5k just ask the mechanics to give the chain a look, and if they notice anything awry you can have it changed at that point. As a general rule these parts are built to last, so don't lose any sleep over it, check it every 5k and/or have it replaced if you want the peace of mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's a wear and tear part, it will go eventually. Like anything though there are a million and one factors to how long it will last. It's part of a system, so if any part of the system breaks it could damage the chain, or the chain could just develop a weakness and go.

The reality is that you may even put a brand new chain on which has a defect and breaks within a week.

If you get the oil changed every 5k just ask the mechanics to give the chain a look, and if they notice anything awry you can have it changed at that point. As a general rule these parts are built to last, so don't lose any sleep over it, check it every 5k and/or have it replaced if you want the peace of mind.
Thank you for the quick reply. So you have seen original timing chains go 130k-140k miles?
 

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In all honesty, no. I've not seen any go that high, I'd have them replaced according to the service interval or sooner if | felt they needed it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
In all honesty, no. I've not seen any go that high, I'd have them replaced according to the service interval or sooner if | felt they needed it.
I gotcha. Well I appreciate your help and replies. I love the vehicle and I still think it’s worth it. I just have to figure out a fair price for getting it done. The cheapest I have found is $4500. The good part is it’s a direct swap for my current truck so I won’t be having to pay for the vehicle.
 

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If I were you, I'd find a reputable land rover specialist in the area and pay them to inspect the car on your behalf. You may end up spending a couple of hundred dollars to get it done properly, but if you're serious then they are by far the best placed to tell you what you can expect to go wrong, and how much it would cost. They may look over the vehicle and flag up a few issues that you might not be aware of. What you do then is take a look at the estimated cost to repair it, and check against the warranty to see if its covered or not. Remember that there's a decent chance that they look it over and find nothing wrong at all, in which case $4500 in savings is a better idea as you'd need to have a fairly sizeable repair bill to even use half of that.

Also the benefit of having someone who knows what they're talking about look at the car beforehand means you might decide NOT to buy it as it might not be cost effective to do so :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If I were you, I'd find a reputable land rover specialist in the area and pay them to inspect the car on your behalf. You may end up spending a couple of hundred dollars to get it done properly, but if you're serious then they are by far the best placed to tell you what you can expect to go wrong, and how much it would cost. They may look over the vehicle and flag up a few issues that you might not be aware of. What you do then is take a look at the estimated cost to repair it, and check against the warranty to see if its covered or not. Remember that there's a decent chance that they look it over and find nothing wrong at all, in which case $4500 in savings is a better idea as you'd need to have a fairly sizeable repair bill to even use half of that.

Also the benefit of having someone who knows what they're talking about look at the car beforehand means you might decide NOT to buy it as it might not be cost effective to do so :)
very true. I completely agree. A Indy shop near me is pretty reputable and said they could do it for $150 a pre purchase inspection. The vehicle is actually not in warranty. The $4500 was just a cost of a timing chain repair. I was hopingI could get the timing chain repair done for under $3k.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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It's a wear and tear part, it will go eventually. Like anything though there are a million and one factors to how long it will last. It's part of a system, so if any part of the system breaks it could damage the chain, or the chain could just develop a weakness and go.

The reality is that you may even put a brand new chain on which has a defect and breaks within a week.

If you get the oil changed every 5k just ask the mechanics to give the chain a look, and if they notice anything awry you can have it changed at that point. As a general rule these parts are built to last, so don't lose any sleep over it, check it every 5k and/or have it replaced if you want the peace of mind.
Yes and NO.

The 2010-2012 model Sports have a very specific and known design flaw in the timing chain TENSIONERS, not the chain itself.

Read my first post and the documentation I provided.

Original poster, did you read what I provided? First thing to do is get the VIN number and compare it to what I provided. It will show you exactly whether or not your particular vehicle is affected.

Please do this.
 

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Ok, at least you know.

The issue is not so much maintenance related as it is a 2-fold design flaw:

The tensioners are 2 spring loaded doohickeys that apply pressure to the back side of the the 2 chain guides.

Flaw 1: The tensioners were designed with a poor AOA or angle of attack.

Flaw 2: The guides are made of some soft metal like aluminum and as the tensioners apply pressure with a harder steel piston, they begin to dig in from day one. Flaw #1 only makes this worse.

When the hole is carved deep enough, voila! Loose, noisey chain!

Ours has been doing this for over 2 years. At idle, you can really hear it. Step on the gas and it shuts up. If you ever decide to get this work done, make sure your shop uses only revised Land Rover parts. The flaws have been addressed and it shouldn't be a problem again.

There is about a 2 year old class action law suit about this. I have no idea where it stands.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ok, at least you know.

The issue is not so much maintenance related as it is a 2-fold design flaw:

The tensioners are 2 spring loaded doohickeys that apply pressure to the back side of the the 2 chain guides.

Flaw 1: The tensioners were designed with a poor AOA or angle of attack.

Flaw 2: The guides are made of some soft metal like aluminum and as the tensioners apply pressure with a harder steel piston, they begin to dig in from day one. Flaw #1 only makes this worse.

When the hole is carved deep enough, voila! Loose, noisey chain!

Ours has been doing this for over 2 years. At idle, you can really hear it. Step on the gas and it shuts up. If you ever decide to get this work done, make sure your shop uses only revised Land Rover parts. The flaws have been addressed and it shouldn't be a problem again.

There is about a 2 year old class action law suit about this. I have no idea where it stands.
Can you really tell a difference at idle when the car is cranked? What does it sound like? I feel like these things are a little noises to begin with if you have your head up at the front of the engine listening for it.
 

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Put someone inside with it running and listen at the grill. It sounds like a toned down version of a diesel engine. Have the person step on the brake and put it in gear. That pulls the chains a little tighter and the noise smooths out.
 
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