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2014 Range Rover HSE V6
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I’ve had a few instances in decent rainstorm where the cars Hydroplanes. One instance where I was going about 60 mph and 100% thought I was going to total the car and by some miracle I got the car under control before hitting a curb (which probably would have caused the car to flip over). I’m now very hesitant and careful when I drive in a rainstorm to avoid issues like this. I run on 22” rims with Pirelli Scorpios. My brother had a similar car to mine and also had the same issue on the highway doing about 65-70 mph on 20” Continentals. Anyone else have experience with this ?
 

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I thought it was just me but in heavy rain/summer rains I have also felt that feeling many times. A few weeks ago I slid across a few lanes and almost hit the concrete barrier which spooked me real good.

Now whenever it rains heavy, I immediately switch to the middle lane and drive under 60 both hands on the wheel 😂

Running 22s as well with plenty of life on tires.
 

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2014 Range Rover HSE V6
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is this a thing with this car ? I’ve never experienced this with any other cars including SUV’s , sedans and coupes. I know what you mean about being spooked. The day I almost hit the curb went from driving 60-70mph to 30mph the rest of the way home. Saw my life flash before my eyes. This was on a regular Blvd so can’t imagine how I would feel if this happened on the highway.
 

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I would have to say it is something related to the characteristic of the truck. We all can’t be bad drivers 😂

But really joke aside I have never hydroplaned any car or ever even came that close and I have had many high performance RWD cars with bad tires in the same type of rain.
 

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2016 TD6 and 2018 SCV8 Range Rover Sports
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Hydroplaning is directly tied to the tires. The grooves in tread siphon water away allowing the tire to contact the road vs having a film of water in between. Many RRs come with high performance tires that have short sidewalls with tread patterns and rubber compounds meant for optimal contact and handling on dry pavement. The OEMs install tires rated for the speed capability of the vehicle despite how the vehicle will be used.
I have found "all season" tires work better for 99% of the adverse conditions and people's normal driving style and are especially better for wet roads and light snow, usually cost a bit less and have a higher treadwear rating.
And to state the obvious, tires with worn tread and high tire pressures will hydroplane more than the same tire with good tread and pressure.
 

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2014 Range Rover HSE V6
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hydroplaning is directly tied to the tires. The grooves in tread siphon water away allowing the tire to contact the road vs having a film of water in between. Many RRs come with high performance tires that have short sidewalls with tread patterns and rubber compounds meant for optimal contact and handling on dry pavement. The OEMs install tires rated for the speed capability of the vehicle despite how the vehicle will be used.
I have found "all season" tires work better for 99% of the adverse conditions and people's normal driving style and are especially better for wet roads and light snow, usually cost a bit less and have a higher treadwear rating.
And to state the obvious, tires with worn tread and high tire pressures will hydroplane more than the same tire with good tread and pressure.
I’ve always had all seasons on my Rover. Usually keep an eye on the tire pressure but yes sometimes I let it wear too much which can be a problem.
 

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2016 TD6 and 2018 SCV8 Range Rover Sports
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I’ve always had all seasons on my Rover. Usually keep an eye on the tire pressure but yes sometimes I let it wear too much which can be a problem.
Yep! There are built-in "wear bars" that are below and perpendicular between the treads. This helps you visually identify how much usable tread is left. When the tread is flush to the wear bar it's time to look for new tires. The rule of thumb is replace the tires when there is 3/32 of an inch or less tread depth (some say 4/32nds) as you can no longer be sure they will effectively displace water.
 

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2019 Range Rover Sport SCV8 ATB (L494)
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On another note I only get about 25-30k miles on my tires. Cost to replace about $1600-2000.
30k is actually awesome on these cars. Big, heavy, full-time AWD cars chew through tires. Anything over 20k miles should be seen as a bonus with a RR.
 
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2016 TD6 and 2018 SCV8 Range Rover Sports
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On another note I only get about 25-30k miles on my tires. Cost to replace about $1600-2000.
Sounds like they are high performance tires and the downside of 22's being fewer tire choices. My 2016 came with 19's, also few choices so I ended up replacing them with 20" take-offs where choices are plentiful. You can check the Discount Tire or Tire Rack websites to see what's available and the characteristics of each tire including wet/dry performance and tread wear.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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Interesting thread.

So is it a tire tread issue or something about the balance and suspension of the Mark IV?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I had some hydroplaning with the Continental OE tires. I switched to Yokohama Geolander XCVs and while they are a touch louder, I haven't had the slightest amount of worry in rain, snow, or icy conditions no matter the speed.

I had a very unsettling feeling with the Contis at 50-60MPH in heavy rain. None of that with the Yokohamas.

Absolutely fantastic tires and still made in Japan! That's how you know they're quality.
 

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Pirelli Scorpion Verdes on the 22s. Yes I have also notice this for the first time in a RR. I plan on chewing them up and replacing at 4-5/32nds. No enough lateral siping in the tread pattern IMHO.
Many things that get you mileage take away from performance like squirming tread patterns and harder rubber. Cooler temps also contribute.

On another note, if the new AWD system stays RWD more often, try using the Snow mode in the rain. This mandates more AWD intervention so the front end will apply more power more often....
 

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2000 Range Rover P38 4.6HSE
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Not that much experience with hydroplaning either, but my P38 has done it with Bridgestone Dueler A/T’s on 16’s, and I run 1.8bar front 2.3/2.4 rear. Tread is getting low, more like road tires so could be that! Thinking that the width of the tire also has an effect, because I have a little Fiat Uno with skinny tires and it cuts through those hydroplaning puddles like butter.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I had some hydroplaning with the Continental OE tires. I switched to Yokohama Geolander XCVs and while they are a touch louder, I haven't had the slightest amount of worry in rain, snow, or icy conditions no matter the speed.

I had a very unsettling feeling with the Contis at 50-60MPH in heavy rain. None of that with the Yokohamas.

Absolutely fantastic tires and still made in Japan! That's how you know they're quality.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I cannot agree more with regard to the Yokohoma tires. I have 240,000 on my L405 and have tried virtually every tire. These are the bat tires I have utilized. I am getting 45-50,000 miles per set as well. Very little to no hydroplaning as well. Give them a try.
 
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