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Discussion Starter #1
The fronts took all day. Now I know the trick*.

Tools and Materials:

Jack and such.
Hand tools
C-clamp, 4 or 5" or larger
BFH
Quality brake pads with sensor, such as Autozone carries (~$40/pair, lifetime). I use metalic as I don't usually turn rotors
Large cotter pins (mine came from a kit from homier/HDC)
Printed version of the manual

Get it safely up and wheels off.

Pull cotter pins and spring clips.

Sit on the manual if it makes you more comfortable, else, through it away. *This is the trick. Don't sit on the CD or laptop.

Get out bolts securing the calipers. Use the ones on the back (inner). If you pull the front or outer bolts, the calipers come apart, probably requiring replacement or rebuilt for the sadists in the crowd. You may have to beat the snot out of the wrench with the BFH. Light taps is all mine took. Remember, from the front, it will look like you are turning clockwise.

You can wire the caliper up if you are ascared of damaging the tubing, I let mine hang. If it breaks that easy, it was already broken.

Get the cap off the master cyl., and place several rags or an old towel under it.

Use the C-clamp to press the pucks back in. You're supposed to clean them, I didn't. I check for fluid flooding out of the Master each puck; mine never overflowed. Feel the rotor for deep grooves and inspect the visible area. We're looking for major damage here, like 1/8" deep gouges. If it's really rough in an annular path, they may benefit from turning. In my experience, good metallic pads will take care of that for you, unless the damage is so severe the disks need replacing. If you are worried about premature wear, Autozone will replace them for free even if a caliper hangs up and burns the pad. I've never replaced pads twice on one truck, except for the hung caliper scenario.

Recap the Master and clean up any spills before it starts eating paint and God knows what else.

Bolt caliper back on and load pads, spring clips and cotter pins. I tap my cotter pins home with a punch/BFH before bending the ends. You don't have to, but it makes them less sloppy. You can look up the torque for the calipers; I just tapped them back with the BFH. They're not going anywhere.

Oh, you can also get a grease made for the metal edges of the calipers to make them slip in and out easier and special glue to glue them to the pucks, but I don't see it makes any difference long term. The best cure for disk brake noise is a good stereo system.

Wheels on, drop it down, and drive it like you stole it!

*So the trick is to pull the calipers and press the pucks back in rather than attempting to press them back as the manual would have you. You can try to press them back in place, but it's very difficult to get a regular c-clamp to work. On the fronts I even tried to copy the Rover tool to do this and the C-clamp just broke (my ugly welds held!). YMMV. I know the fronts were the worst brakes I ever did and the rears the easiest.
 

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You don't have to remove the calipers to change the pads. Pry pads out with screwdriver or small pry bar, pry back caliper pistons or use special tool. Insert new pads and secure with new cotter pins and ante rattle springs. If you remove the calipers replace the piston seals, if the pistons themselves have any corrosion on them replace them too.
 
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To me it seems like wasted effort to change just the pads. The rotors for the truck aren't that expensive and when you do the rotors, you get a chance to repack the wheel bearings. All good things to do. The difference in stopping between new rotors/new pads and old rotors/new pads is like night and day, even after the new pads seat on the old rotors. YMMV.
 

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I would like to see a step by step wheel bearing packing thread. :think:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you go in after the bearings, one of those cone shaped bearing packers makes the job faster, more thorough and less, uh, greasy.
 

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i found that it would be a good idea to purchase new wheel bearing oil seals before tackling the wheel bearing packing job. if you find that one of the seals is bad then you have to either put it back together incorrectly or install the new ones and do the job right. not all wheel bearing oil seals are going to be bad but just my 2 cents.
odds are the bearings will be dry and in need of much needed attention. dont be afraid to really pack them with grease. also while your down there might as well check gear oil lvl as well. top it off if necessary. a dry cv joint is an unhappy one.
based on the complete tear down of my front axle i can see how you might be able to change the pads in an hour however I would have the rotors turned too... so if your gonna do the pads do the rotors and if your gonna turn the rotors buy wheel bearing seals.
 
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