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Discussion Starter #1
hello
planning to tow a boat with my RR'06. didn't realize that the receiver is so far back under the bumper. trailer/ boat weight 5500 pounds
the recommended maximum distance is 11 inches from receiver , but in reality need about 16.
anyone with experience in towing a boat with this kind of rig? makes me nervous not to follow manufacture's rec's

thanks

John K
 

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I have one on my 06 RR HSE and pull over that with mine. My tongue weight was the first concern I had, but having pulled the same boat with a BMW X5, I quickly dismissed it. As long as you're not really tongue heavy, the car will easily handle the weight and longer extension.
 

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Just researched this and happy to share from memory so forgive me if I'm off by a few pounds. The L322 has a towing capacity of 7,500 lbs with a weight distribution hitch and I believe 5,500 lbs without. Most receiver extensions have a max towing capacity of 4k lbs so once you add an extension you effectively reduce the towing capacity to 4k lbs and max tongue weight of 400 lbs.

You can readily find extended ball mounts with a 7,500 towing capacity, 10" is sufficient. This will maintain your original towing capacity and tongue weight. Our trucks have crazy high towing capacities. My Suburban had 5,500 lbs to give an example. On a side note in my research I ran across the reason why our receivers are tucked so far under the vehicle, at least from one source. It was done to maintain the sharp departure angle from obstacles although I would probably prefer a regular receiver location and the added steel under the bumper on those sharp departure angles. Interesting bit of trivia though.

Here's the ball mount adapter I bought: Curt Manufacturing 45840 10 1/4 ball mount adapter 7,500 lbs.
Length 10-1/4 in.
Towing Capacity 7,500 lbs
Tongue Capacity 750 lbs.
Drop 2 in.
Rise 3/4 in.
Price $29.99

Here's where I bought it: Curt Black Steel Ball Mount by Curt at Fleet Farm
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Since talking about towing, I‘ll be towing my P38 next week. That on a uhaul car hauler will put me in the neighborhood of max towing.
Is there a towing speed I should maintain? I know I can’t or shouldn’t tow at my normal cruising speed of 70 mph plus. But I also don’t want to be a hazard on the highway going too slow.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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2020 RR P525 HSE
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Happy Boating - RR is made for boats and horses.

The benefit if the longer extension is not pinching your hand. In our 2008 we used a 12” Extension (still have that) with our 22’ boat). (you can order them from JC Whitney). Never had an issue, towing even will above speed limit, air suspension seems to sense the weight.

You may want to then add a drop to lower the connection angle to the trailer Just me being OCD but I like the trailer ball close to level with the trailer and Parnell to the ground (vs tilting up at a weird angle).

* on the boat ramp remember the RR vehicle is way short compared to the Tahoe next to you and it’s super easy to over correct. You may have to go further toward lake edge then others, not a problem just feels different, also like to put it in slippery mode just in case.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I have 13,000 miles experience towing with an L322, but 1) With a 2004, not a 2006; and 2) Pulling a 5,500 lb camping trailer rather than a boat. But if the 2004/2006 use the same (??) factory Westfalia hitch, then the info should basically be the same, or at least similar. But I don't know nuthin' 'bout boat pullin'. My chosen medium is pine tree needles rather than water.

My 2004 has the same 11" max tow bar length, but presumably that's at max trailer weight and max tongue weight. For mine it's 770 lb tongue max / 7,700 lb trailer max, as listed on the hitch label. If you go lower with both weights, you can, in theory, use a longer tow bar/mount, although the Land Rover engineers might show their displeasure by punching you in the face. Whatever mount you use for your 5,500 lb boat, you'll need to accept that the ball will simply be close to the bumper -- I don't know of a way around that. If you're pulling a 2,000 lb utility trailer with 300 lbs tongue weight, then yes, you could go mucho long on the bar. But not for your boat. Think of it as a pry bar, longer versus shorter, more leverage versus less, and it all self-explains. I've probably hitched up a hundred times, and my poor rear bumper skin has the battle scars to prove it. So you might want to use a wooden board or similar to temporarily protect the bumper as you're backing within an inch or two of the trailer coupler, as your low-slung Rover hitch will demand.

Tow bars/mounts are measured from the pin hole to the trailer ball hole. Two years ago I did some hillbilly math, which I retrieved just now for this, and concluded then that going with a 12.25" bar instead of 11" would require me to reduce the tongue weight by 13% (770 lbs reduced to 670 lbs). And going with a 13" bar would require reducing tongue weight by 22% (770 lbs reduced to 600 lbs). For brevity I won't explain my hillbilly math here, which I subcontracted out to my neighbor's wicked-smart Golden Retriever in exchange for crackers and Cheese Whiz. You'd also want to reduce overall trailer weight significantly below the max if you go long on the bar. Since the Rover hitches/receivers are tucked so low to the ground (for both aesthetics and off-roading), I had to install my tow bar in the uncommon inverted position (bar flipped upside-down so that the trailer ball is FARTHER from the asphalt). You can go to trailer websites that will show you how to determine proper tow bar drop/rise. FYI, a wise young man named Beavis once shouted "ALWAYS KEEP YOUR BALLS GREASED!" And he couldn't have been more correct. Routinely lubing the coupler slider with spray lube, along with greasing the trailer ball, makes hitching MUCH easier in that the coupler only need be in the general vicinity of the ball, and gravity+grease will pull the coupler over an inch in whatever direction it needs to go, not so much when dry. Smart guy, that Beavis.

After trying out three tow bars I settled on the 12.25" Curt #45260. There's also 13" bars available, such as the Eaz-Lift #48290 and #48312, although I'd view them as probably too long for your boat (too much "pry bar" leverage on the hitch). To deal with occasional high winds I also use an Eaz-Lift #48380 sway controller, Draw Tite #26003 bracket, and Curt #40021 long-shank ball (due to the added thickness of the bracket). But you're towing a boat, which is like a knife though the air, as opposed to my plywood-through-air camping trailer, so perhaps you can skip the anti-sway?? Don't know. You don't need a weight equalizing hitch since the pneumatic suspension will adapt its butt height as needed (like Jennifer Lopez), a primary reason I bought an L322 for towing.

And L322s tow quite nicely. But although my BMW mill always runs cool, the ZF 5HP transmission reliably overheats on long, steep Sierra grades, even if it were in new condition. You have a ZF 6HP transmission, so your experience may be the same...or different...don't really know. But most definitely have your tranny fluid and filter changed. If you're towing on flatlands and modest hills, this may rarely be a problem. But the Sierras tax my ZF to its limits.

If you get a Tekonsha or Curt wireless brake controller, you can bypass tapping into the Range Rover electricals altogether. I have a Tekonsha wireless, and it works well. If the lights on your trailer are LED, you MAY have weird problems materialize because of that, such as fast turn indicators and such. Search the message boards on that matter. One last tidbit, the BEST TOWING ADVICE EVER (wish I could claim credit for it): When backing a trailer, place ONE hand at the bottom of the steering wheel and pivot left to turn the rear of the trailer to the left, and opposite for the right. Backing quickly falls into place once you learn that. Oh...and practice that whole ball-greasing thing religiously.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just researched this and happy to share from memory so forgive me if I'm off by a few pounds. The L322 has a towing capacity of 7,500 lbs with a weight distribution hitch and I believe 5,500 lbs without. Most receiver extensions have a max towing capacity of 4k lbs so once you add an extension you effectively reduce the towing capacity to 4k lbs and max tongue weight of 400 lbs.

You can readily find extended ball mounts with a 7,500 towing capacity, 8" is sufficient. This will maintain your original towing capacity and tongue weight. Our trucks have crazy high towing capacities. My Suburban had 5,500 lbs to give an example. On a side note in my research I ran across the reason why our receivers are tucked so far under the vehicle, at least from one source. It was done to maintain the sharp departure angle from obstacles althought I would probably prefer a regular receiver location and the add steel under the bumper on those sharp departure angles. Interesting bit of trivia.

Here's the ball mount adapter I bought: Curt Manufacturing 45830 8 1/4 ball mount adapter 7,500 lbs.
Length8-1/4 in.
Towing Capacity 7,500 lbs
Tongue Capacity 750 lbs.
Drop 2 in.
Rise 3/4 in.
Price $19.99

Here's where I bought it: Curt Black Steel Ball Mount by Curt at Fleet Farm
wouldn't the 8-1/4 in be too short? this length doesn't even clear the rear bumper
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have 13,000 miles experience towing with an L322, but 1) With a 2004, not a 2006; and 2) Pulling a 5,500 lb camping trailer rather than a boat. But if the 2004/2006 use the same (??) factory Westfalia hitch, then the info should basically be the same, or at least similar. But I don't know nuthin' 'bout boat pullin'. My chosen medium is pine tree needles rather than water.

My 2004 has the same 11" max tow bar length, but presumably that's at max trailer weight and max tongue weight. For mine it's 770 lb tongue max / 7,700 lb trailer max, as listed on the hitch label. If you go lower with both weights, you can, in theory, use a longer tow bar/mount, although the Land Rover engineers might show their displeasure by punching you in the face. Whatever mount you use for your 5,500 lb boat, you'll need to accept that the ball will simply be close to the bumper -- I don't know of a way around that. If you're pulling a 2,000 lb utility trailer with 300 lbs tongue weight, then yes, you could go mucho long on the bar. But not for your boat. Think of it as a pry bar, longer versus shorter, more leverage versus less, and it all self-explains. I've probably hitched up a hundred times, and my poor rear bumper skin has the battle scars to prove it. So you might want to use a wooden board or similar to temporarily protect the bumper as you're backing within an inch or two of the trailer coupler, as your low-slung Rover hitch will demand.

Two bars/mounts are measured from the pin hole to the trailer ball hole. Two years ago I did some hillbilly math, which I retrieved just now for this, and concluded then that going with a 12.25" bar instead of 11" would require me to reduce the tongue weight by 13% (770 lbs reduced to 670 lbs). And going with a 13" bar would require reducing tongue weight by 22% (770 lbs reduced to 600 lbs). For brevity I won't explain my hillbilly math here, which I subcontracted out to my neighbor's wicked-smart Golden Retriever in exchange for crackers and Cheese Whiz. You'd also want to reduce overall trailer weight significantly below the max if you go long on the bar. Since the Rover hitches/receivers are tucked so low to the ground (for both aesthetics and off-roading), I had to install my tow bar in the uncommon inverted position (bar flipped upside-down so that the trailer ball is FARTHER from the asphalt). You can go to trailer websites that will show you how to determine proper tow bar drop/rise. FYI, a wise young man named Beavis once shouted "ALWAYS KEEP YOUR BALLS GREASED!" And he couldn't have been more correct. Routinely lubing the coupler slider with spray lube, along with greasing the trailer ball, makes hitching MUCH easier in that the coupler only need be in the general vicinity of the ball, and gravity+grease will pull the coupler over an inch in whatever direction it needs to go, not so much when dry. Smart guy, that Beavis.

After trying out three tow bars I settled on the 12.25" Curt #45260. There's also 13" bars available, such as the Eaz-Lift #48290 and #48312, although I'd view them as probably too long for your boat (too much "pry bar" leverage on the hitch). To deal with occasional high winds I also use an Eaz-Lift #48380 sway controller, Draw Tite #26003 bracket, and Curt #40021 long-shank ball (due to the added thickness of the bracket). But you're towing a boat, which is like a knife though the air, as opposed to my plywood-through-air camping trailer, so perhaps you can skip the anti-sway?? Don't know. You don't need a weight equalizing hitch since the pneumatic suspension will adapt its butt height as needed (like Jennifer Lopez), a primary reason I bought an L322 for towing.

And L322s tow quite nicely. But although my BMW mill always runs cool, the ZF 5HP transmission reliably overheats on long, steep Sierra grades, even if it were in new condition. You have a ZF 6HP transmission, so your experience may be the same...or different...don't really know. But most definitely have your tranny fluid and filter changed. If you're towing on flatlands and modest hills, this may rarely be a problem. But the Sierras tax my ZF to its limits.

If you get a Tekonsha or Curt wireless brake controller, you can bypass tapping into the Range Rover electricals altogether. I have a Tekonsha wireless, and it works well. If the lights on your trailer are LED, you MAY have weird problems materialize because of that, such as fast turn indicators and such. Search the message boards on that matter. One last tidbit, the BEST TOWING ADVICE EVER (wish I could claim credit for it): When backing a trailer, place ONE hand at the bottom of the steering wheel and pivot left to turn the rear of the trailer to the left, and opposite for the right. Backing quickly falls into place once you learn that. Oh...and practice that whole ball-greasing thing religiously.
great advice! Thanks !
 

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Some measurements for anyone who might want to play "Math Engineer Smarty-Pants Dude" or whatever one calls themselves when calculating whether they can go longer than the 11" tow bar max due to weights well below the hitch limits. What I'll call the "unsupported" portion of a tow bar is that portion of bar that is NOT enclosed inside the hitch receiver, extending outside the hitch tube. Unsupported length is from the butt of the hitch receiver tube (the very rear of a Rover's hitch) to the trailer ball hole. All info here and above presumably applies mostly/exclusively to North American hitches.

-U-Haul 10.25" bar: 8.75" is unsupported (bar places trailer coupler uncomfortably close to bumper)
-Typical 11" bar: 9.5" is unsupported
-Curt #45260 12.25" bar: 10.75" is unsupported
-Typical 13" bar: 11.65" is unsupported
 

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LuisC: Regarding towing speed in your situation, I don't know of a standardized speed that will work for you (the car trailer will have various safety stickers on it including MPH, of course). But after a while you'll sense a comfortable and safe speed as go, whether it's 55, 60 or even 65 MPH. To some extent the rig will let you know what speed works. If you want to chill and go slow, simply wait for a slower big rig to go by in the slow lane, then pull in a couple hundred feet behind and let him set the (slow) pace. I often do that while towing my camping trailer if I just want to chill to music or not want to stress the transmission temperature on hills. It's also convenient because you don't have to worry about being a turtle to other cars -- it's the truck ahead setting that slow pace, not you. And follow the min. 3 second rule: When the vehicle ahead passes a roadside object, 3+ seconds should pass before you go by it.
 

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I bought an extended ball mount from Uhaul. It is rated for 7500lbs. I went out to my truck to look at the size and it is scratched off.
It wasnt very expensive and my trailers fit just fine.
As far as towing, I have towed a lot with mine. I have a 20” car hauler that weighs probably just under 2000lbs. I towed the trailer with a corvette and a motorcycle and other stuff from Ohio to Florida. Probably 6000lbs plus the rear of the truck was filled with tools and stuff. No brake controller. No weight distributing hitch. Towed at well over the speed limit and ran great. Great up and down jellico mount. Great truck.
 

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I bought an extended ball mount from Uhaul. It is rated for 7500lbs. I went out to my truck to look at the size and it is scratched off.
It wasnt very expensive and my trailers fit just fine.
As far as towing, I have towed a lot with mine. I have a 20” car hauler that weighs probably just under 2000lbs. I towed the trailer with a corvette and a motorcycle and other stuff from Ohio to Florida. Probably 6000lbs plus the rear of the truck was filled with tools and stuff. No brake controller. No weight distributing hitch. Towed at well over the speed limit and ran great. Great up and down jellico mount. Great truck.
I tow a 3.5 ton caravan with my 2007 RR Vogue.
The hitch extension I use is solid 2 inch square section, not hollow, and is rated at the same 3.5 ton as the reciever.
There is no way it is ever going to break!
 

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I have 13,000 miles experience towing with an L322, but 1) With a 2004, not a 2006; and 2) Pulling a 5,500 lb camping trailer rather than a boat. But if the 2004/2006 use the same (??) factory Westfalia hitch, then the info should basically be the same, or at least similar. But I don't know nuthin' 'bout boat pullin'. My chosen medium is pine tree needles rather than water.

My 2004 has the same 11" max tow bar length, but presumably that's at max trailer weight and max tongue weight. For mine it's 770 lb tongue max / 7,700 lb trailer max, as listed on the hitch label. If you go lower with both weights, you can, in theory, use a longer tow bar/mount, although the Land Rover engineers might show their displeasure by punching you in the face. Whatever mount you use for your 5,500 lb boat, you'll need to accept that the ball will simply be close to the bumper -- I don't know of a way around that. If you're pulling a 2,000 lb utility trailer with 300 lbs tongue weight, then yes, you could go mucho long on the bar. But not for your boat. Think of it as a pry bar, longer versus shorter, more leverage versus less, and it all self-explains. I've probably hitched up a hundred times, and my poor rear bumper skin has the battle scars to prove it. So you might want to use a wooden board or similar to temporarily protect the bumper as you're backing within an inch or two of the trailer coupler, as your low-slung Rover hitch will demand.

Tow bars/mounts are measured from the pin hole to the trailer ball hole. Two years ago I did some hillbilly math, which I retrieved just now for this, and concluded then that going with a 12.25" bar instead of 11" would require me to reduce the tongue weight by 13% (770 lbs reduced to 670 lbs). And going with a 13" bar would require reducing tongue weight by 22% (770 lbs reduced to 600 lbs). For brevity I won't explain my hillbilly math here, which I subcontracted out to my neighbor's wicked-smart Golden Retriever in exchange for crackers and Cheese Whiz. You'd also want to reduce overall trailer weight significantly below the max if you go long on the bar. Since the Rover hitches/receivers are tucked so low to the ground (for both aesthetics and off-roading), I had to install my tow bar in the uncommon inverted position (bar flipped upside-down so that the trailer ball is FARTHER from the asphalt). You can go to trailer websites that will show you how to determine proper tow bar drop/rise. FYI, a wise young man named Beavis once shouted "ALWAYS KEEP YOUR BALLS GREASED!" And he couldn't have been more correct. Routinely lubing the coupler slider with spray lube, along with greasing the trailer ball, makes hitching MUCH easier in that the coupler only need be in the general vicinity of the ball, and gravity+grease will pull the coupler over an inch in whatever direction it needs to go, not so much when dry. Smart guy, that Beavis.

After trying out three tow bars I settled on the 12.25" Curt #45260. There's also 13" bars available, such as the Eaz-Lift #48290 and #48312, although I'd view them as probably too long for your boat (too much "pry bar" leverage on the hitch). To deal with occasional high winds I also use an Eaz-Lift #48380 sway controller, Draw Tite #26003 bracket, and Curt #40021 long-shank ball (due to the added thickness of the bracket). But you're towing a boat, which is like a knife though the air, as opposed to my plywood-through-air camping trailer, so perhaps you can skip the anti-sway?? Don't know. You don't need a weight equalizing hitch since the pneumatic suspension will adapt its butt height as needed (like Jennifer Lopez), a primary reason I bought an L322 for towing.

And L322s tow quite nicely. But although my BMW mill always runs cool, the ZF 5HP transmission reliably overheats on long, steep Sierra grades, even if it were in new condition. You have a ZF 6HP transmission, so your experience may be the same...or different...don't really know. But most definitely have your tranny fluid and filter changed. If you're towing on flatlands and modest hills, this may rarely be a problem. But the Sierras tax my ZF to its limits.

If you get a Tekonsha or Curt wireless brake controller, you can bypass tapping into the Range Rover electricals altogether. I have a Tekonsha wireless, and it works well. If the lights on your trailer are LED, you MAY have weird problems materialize because of that, such as fast turn indicators and such. Search the message boards on that matter. One last tidbit, the BEST TOWING ADVICE EVER (wish I could claim credit for it): When backing a trailer, place ONE hand at the bottom of the steering wheel and pivot left to turn the rear of the trailer to the left, and opposite for the right. Backing quickly falls into place once you learn that. Oh...and practice that whole ball-greasing thing religiously.
This is a funny post. Thanks for the effort and the resulting levity.
 

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TCV's post is pretty funny and I realize this post might make me look like "Math Engineer Smarty-Pants Dude". But the shoe probably fits. If you are going to calculate and de-rate the allowed tongue weight, I think you really need to look at the moment arm you are placing on the rear axle. At least partially, that's why a RR is good at towing, short rear overhang compared to a giant pickup or Suburban. But back to the math. Say its 3' from the center of the rear axle (I didn't measure just a guess) to the hitch ball factory recommended location. Then you add 1.5" to that with a extension. Using 770lbs. at the original location, you would only de-rate to 759 lbs., you could add a 5.37" extension and still have 670lbs. The math is easy, distance from axle center to hitch ball x 770 lbs. divided by the new distance to the hitch ball = new tongue weight allowed. I haven't loaded up my L322 yet but I can tell you that with the P38, LR was very conservative in load ratings. I overloaded mine to the point it could barely make highway speed and it was still stable just out of power. Its probably going to be different with the L322 but I suspect that you could go to the limit without issue. LR know that the US is a litigious bunch, we can blame stupidity on others and get money for it.
 

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Glad you found my Beavis yammerings as a low, rumbling humor....much like a suppressed beer belch that eventually explodes to freedom right in the middle of your final job interview.

NorCalRR: Thanks for responding with your jib-jab! To be honest, I was hoping someone with a mechanical engineering or similar background might reply to both comment and either confirm or disprove my hillbilly math, as provided under contract by my neighbor's wicked-smart Golden Retriever.

I thoroughly get your comments that it's the rear axle that serves as the fulcrum here, rather than the tip of the Range Rover hitch receiver as I thought might be the case. I won't comment one way or another on your version of events, but will nonetheless ask, are you sure a longer "unsupported" section of tow ball mount (the portion of ball mount that extends behind the receiver enclosure) doesn't play a bigger role in number crunching? For example, the "unsupported" portion of a 13" ball mount is 23% longer than with a factory max 11" ball mount. I thought that 23% number of great significance, whereas your version of events places little significance to it. But it sounds like you may have a background and expertise in this field, whereas I skated through 2 years of Engineering before moving on to a BS in Fire Protection Administration, which I namely use now as a means to acquire India Pale Ale.

Deferring to your interpretation of how this all works, it was easy enough to molest my L322's private parts with a tape measure and get the particulars. The "X%" numbers below are the length increase/decrease in comparison to a baseline factory max 11" ball mount.

2004 RANGE ROVER - APPROX. DISTANCE FROM REAR AXLE SHAFT TO TRAILER BALL HOLE:

-U-Haul #13112 10.25" ball mount: 48" (-1.5%)
-Factory max 11" ball mount: 48.75" (Baseline)
-Curt #45250/45260 12.25" ball mount: 50" (+2.5%)
-Typical 13" ball mount: 50.75" (+4%)

I'll defer to others on the significance of these distance measurements and their practical application.
 

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Another squirrel thought...

Perhaps I got it half-right? One calculates the numbers as you suggested, with the rear axle as the fulcrum (and not the butt end of the factory hitch as fulcrum). But the additional "unsupported" portion of ball mount when going longer than 11" IS of great importance..... and that importance is reflected by the (potentially) reduced max tongue/max trailer weights stamped onto that longer ball mount. So substantially longer "unsupported" lengths IS of great relevance.... just not in the way I thought??

The significance here is that one could crunch numbers, as you indicated, and conclude, "Well, I can add 5 inches and reduce weights only by a modest 15% (or whatever -- random numbers here)." But now there's a SECOND complication, and that's a longer, say 13" ball mount, which tells you via its stamping, "Sorry pal, but I'm a long enough pry bar that I'm having to limit you to 600 lbs tongue and 6,000 lbs trailer, even if the rest of the hitch ahead of me can handle the full 770/7,700 lbs." Put another way, go as long as you want within reason and the overall hitch assembly CAN handle heavy loads as you indicated, but the lengthened ball mount itself CANNOT. The long ball mount is a weak link at the very end of an overall heavy chain.

Is that a possibility? I have an unused, substantially built Eaz-Lift 13" ball mount in my garage that's stamped with reduced 600/6,000 limits, rather than the expected 750/7,500 one sees with shorter ball mounts.

EDIT: This may just be an Eaz-Lift (and Reese) quirk. Visited their website just now, it suggests that even their shorter 9" Class 3 ball mounts are 600/6,000. Curt 13" ball mounts are 750/7,500 in spite of their longer length. So maybe this dog don't hunt.
 

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I did have one fail towing a trailer full of mulch. Couldn’t have been more than 3k.
 

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TCV, yes I am an ME, but I wouldn't claim to be smarter than your neighbor dog. Sometimes my youngest Lab looks at me like I'm a complete idiot. Of course she's a girl where my old boy always thinks I'm awesome, go figure.
I think considering the torque on the hitch is useful (that's what your calc does) but I would expect a pretty big safety factor looking at it beefy construction. Loading on the rear axle and corresponding unload of the front is how your driving experience will be impacted. An example of how this is addressed in really heavy towing is with 5th wheel or gooseneck trailers or semi tractor hitches. They have the big advantage of loading directly over the rear axle and rather than using tonque weight, you can look at it more like the payload rating. And the payload rating is another example of what I am talking about, a much more direct loading of the axles rather than with leverage clear out on the bumper which is why payload is much higher. Again, I think LR is very conservative and possibly trying to protect your airbags from massive overload. Of course follow the rating on your hitch extension as well, but I suspect most are way overbuilt. Teekster's failure was probably more of a manufacturing defect.
 

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Another note, I find a great thing about the airbag system is having a good visual of your trailer loading. When hauling a movable load on my 18' dual axle, its easy to push forward until the airbag sag 3 or 4" or so with the engine off so you know there is downward tongue weight. Then start the engine to level out. Nothing worse than driving and hitting bumps that unload the hitch and jerk you around.
 
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