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just curios, is it mileage or age that gets them? I put mine up and see some tiny weathercracks all over, it's 2001 with 83,000 miles
 

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both, just like tires... you can have new tires on a car that sees 1k/year, and need new tires in 5 years because of age, or 10k/year and need tires in 4 years because of wear....

springs don't see the same wear as tires, but they're constantly flexing so they'll develop small cracks. once you can see cracks it's time for new ones.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Replaced a full set today on a 98, bags were original from then (stamp on bags confirm this) 210 000k's
Then I've seen worse, some lasting 4 years with average use cos they were fong kong replacements.
As to this I have notice Britpart supply non branded ones vs Bearmach which are genuine ones.

If anyone knows the trade prices to retailers I would love to know as Im about to start refusing to except non branded air springs here.
Currently the prices are way to high for air springs and Im not happy
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hi

bandit86 said:
just curios, is it mileage or age that gets them? I put mine up and see some tiny weathercracks all over, it's 2001 with 83,000 miles
The constant flexing at he bottom of the airspring creates and increases the depth of these cracks. Eventually they will leak so it will depend to some extent just how much flexing these airsprings do.

If your airsprings are just showing fine lines/cracks you could try inverting them so that the current TOP and unflexing part of the airspring is placed at he bottom. This (IMHO) should give you almost the same airspring lifetime again. I have NOT tried this myself. This is only an assumption on my part. However I have been told that the airsprings on Classic and P38 RRs are the same at both ends.

As most of the "wear" or flexing takes place at the bottom it seems logical that inverting the spring will extend the lifetime of the original spring.

FWIW, you can also swap the height sensors from side to side to use the otherwise unused portion of the sensor. I have done this to fix a faulty sensor. An EAS recalibration will probably be necessary though.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Peter Sanders said:
If your airsprings are just showing fine lines/cracks you could try inverting them so that the current TOP and unflexing part of the airspring is placed at he bottom. This (IMHO) should give you almost the same airspring lifetime again. I have NOT tried this myself. This is only an assumption on my part. However I have been told that the airsprings on Classic and P38 RRs are the same at both ends.

Hmmmm.... Dennis? Can we do this?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hi

Just to be clear, I do not mean that Classic and P38 airsprings are the same. :) I meant that the Classic airsprings are the same at both ends - I know this from my own experience when I changed my own airsprings. I have been TOLD that the P38 airsprings are the same at both ends.
 

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Following this thread and instead of starting another thread i have a question. I presume you can fit new Gen11 air springs to the front while keeping the standard Dunlops at the rear?
This would not effect the calibration would it? I know Gen111 are longer.
 

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fakawe said:
Following this thread and instead of starting another thread i have a question. I presume you can fit new Gen11 air springs to the front while keeping the standard Dunlops at the rear?
This would not effect the calibration would it? I know Gen111 are longer.
yes, installing springs dos not affect the calibration at all. Installing GenIII's allows you to change the cal, but it is not necessary or required.

kmagnuss said:
Peter Sanders said:
If your airsprings are just showing fine lines/cracks you could try inverting them so that the current TOP and unflexing part of the airspring is placed at he bottom. This (IMHO) should give you almost the same airspring lifetime again. I have NOT tried this myself. This is only an assumption on my part. However I have been told that the airsprings on Classic and P38 RRs are the same at both ends.

Hmmmm.... Dennis? Can we do this?

Yes, the rubber is the same for p38 and classic, flipping a p38 spring should work just fine, if you catch it in time.
 

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Had my replaced at 50,000 and again at 150,000.
First 50,000 spent in Las Vegas and the next 100,000 in N. California.
But that started acting up at around 85,000.
 

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Mine lasted 112K miles on original bags. Replaced the fronts with Arnott's, then mysteriously the perfectly good "never had a problem" rear spring went dead. Replaced the rears and now there were leaks in other areas of the EAS system and I got fed up and converted to the coil spring update.

From my experiences stick with OEM dunlop air springs. The Arnott's are hit and miss when it comes to installing the rears. My buddy used the OEM dunlops from island 4x4 uk before this EAS system started leaking in other areas as well.

http://www.island-4x4.co.uk/springs-dunlop-p-628.html

$224.99 GBP with free shipping, less then $349 shipped for a set of 4 new OEM dunlop air springs. Better then the $500+ I paid for my Arnott's.
 
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