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Discussion Starter #1
What are the tricks to replacing the front brake piston dust seal/boot? I have the old one off (it had a tear), have a new one, but the part that seals to the caliper does not go on the outside like every other one I've replaced. It goes in a goove on the inside of the piston bore.

I can only think of three ways to do this:

1) Force it in with the piston in. Tried that, no luck yet.

2) See if the piston pushes in further to allow the groved are where the boot attaches to the piston to give more clearance. Next thing I'll try, but I doubt this is right.

3) Or, last, take the piston out of the bore, but the boot in the bore channel, put the piston on through the boot. Last resort, as it involves letting air in the system (piston has to come out, and probably best to take the caliper off the car to do this), which I was hoping not to do.

Anyone do this job before? If so, how did you do it?

Thanks!

Austin Franklin
2001 HSE P38A
 

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Discussion Starter #2
#2 - piston does not push in further, so that doesn't work.

There has to be an easy way to do this...or perhaps not...and if there is only a hard way to do this, what is that?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the link, I'll check it out. But I'm impatient, and wanted to get it done. So, I took option 3. it worked, so far. meaning the caliper is all back together (piston was a bear to get out), and now the brakes are all done. I haven't bled the brakes yet (waiting for wife to get home to help...ooh, here she is now), so whether I screwed something up while rebuilding the caliper (replaced the seal and the dust boot on one piston only), I'll find out soon enough.

What a PITA for a silly dust boot. This is one thing I think they could have designed better.

Regards,

Austin
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did it differently than the BMW caliper. There was no way that caliper end of the dust boot was going in without my purposefully seating it in the grove in the caliper bore. So, I didn't put the dust boot on the piston first. I seated it in the caliper bore first, then put the piston into the dust boot (stretching the top of the dust boot over the bottom of the piston). There is no way with the dust boot on the piston you could make sure the dust boot is seated in the caliper bore well enough. Fortunately, there was nothing of note on the piston or on the piston bore. Both looked great.

Brakes bled, road tested, and all seems fine...in fact, better then they ever were. Next week, rear brakes and rotors. As an FYI, I used Akebono EUR676 front pads, and Brembo 25444 rotors, both from Amazon (best prices I could find). Rears are Akebono EUR493 and Brembo rear rotors are 25186.

Regards,

Austin
 

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Thanks for the timely post. I just bought a front rotor and pad set from G-force brakes for $167 Cdn and will need to do the dust seal as well so thanks for the write-up. Rotors are cross-drilled, bevelled and plated to slow rust progression. Pick-up was 2 miles from my home.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Don't be afraid to give the rotors a good whack with a small hand held sledge from the rear side to get them off. If you don't have a small hand held sledge, I'd urge you to get one or two of different weights.

I assume you have done brake work before and are comfortable doing this job. If not, don't hesitate to ask for help.

Regards,

Austin
 

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Thanks. I do brakes periodically on my work vans [never caliper seals or boots so far]and have some "Engish" experience from my time with a "73 TR6. But refresh is always good and support appreciated. I did replace my 2#er in my masons kit so thanks also for the reference to the little club. best regards, diff
 

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This is about 11 years too late, but in case someone else finds this they should know that for this type of piston housing you do have to remove it. Any time you remove a piston you will need to replace the inner seal that the piston slides against as well. For this type of piston housing you seat the dust boot on the piston first, but you slide it down to the bottom. That will solve the problem that AustinFranklin described of not being able to get it in the housing while attached to the boot. Once you have the boot attached to the bottom of the piston you attach the boot to the caliper. You then push the piston into the piston housing, and everything should pop into place.
 

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