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Discussion Starter #21
Some success!

In short, resetting base idle seems to have addressed the low idle at start up and when coming to a stop. I know base idle was brought up early on in this thread but I was reluctant to touch that setting given that the truck ran well at one point. The base idle was found to be really low and the engine barely ran. Adjusting the idle corrected the issue but I now have a faint howling/whistling noise coming from the throttle body. Overall, the driving experience has been dramatically improved.

Thank you for all the excellent discussion in this thread. I'm certain many items were baselined as a result of trying to isolate the root cause of this issue. I hope this thread can be used as reference for others who experience similar issues.
 

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95 Range Rover classic SWB, 2016 RRS Td6
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FYI My 95 SWB doesn’t have the filter on the LH rocker cover it has a hose that goes to the side of the air intake filter housing. Mine was missing when I got it. After putting in a new engine recently I bought a cheap smoke tester. The gallon paint can with heater wire in that used baby oil. It was very useful for finding leaks in the vacuum system.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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FYI My 95 SWB doesn’t have the filter on the LH rocker cover it has a hose that goes to the side of the air intake filter housing.
Not sure what the actual purpose of the filter is, but I think that there's a reason why that hose goes to the plenum and not on the air filter. In theory, the blowby gases that come out of the crankcase are supposedly devoid of oxygen, hence they should not count in deciding how much fuel to inject, hence they should not be metered. That's why they should meet the intake after the MAF and not before.

I'm sure that a car will run well enough even with the hose connected the wrong way, but why giving up a simple and free advantage.

Cool tip about the smoker, thanks.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Not sure what the actual purpose of the filter is, but I think that there's a reason why that hose goes to the plenum and not on the air filter. In theory, the blowby gases that come out of the crankcase are supposedly devoid of oxygen, hence they should not count in deciding how much fuel to inject, hence they should not be metered. That's why they should meet the intake after the MAF and not before.

I'm sure that a car will run well enough even with the hose connected the wrong way, but why giving up a simple and free advantage.

Cool tip about the smoker, thanks.
That filter is an air inlet.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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That filter is an air inlet.
I think it's there to capture droplets of oil that might come out of the engine, pulled out by the intake vacuum. That way they don't dirty the intake and maybe have a way to find their way back into the engine.
My poin in my previous post was that the hose that comes out of that filter should be connected to the intake plenum and not to the air filter.
 

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95 Range Rover classic SWB, 2016 RRS Td6
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Small nipple on back of left rocker cover is connected to air filter housing nipple by a small diameter hose on a 95 Range Rover. Nipple on top of plenum is connected to distributor by a small diameter hose.
 

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Oh, you’re talking about the left side! I see now! Yep, connecting that one to the main air filter makes sense. It’s probably even safer because there’s less risk of the small hole to be clogged by dirt (as mines regularly are).
 

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The "filters" are actually spark/flash arrestors. The idea being that you do not want some flame to flash from your air intake (backfire) into your sump and blow your engine apart. Not sure how high that risk is in reality, but you will find the 'filter' contains some steel wool that stops any flash.

Regular oil changes keep thing generally clean, but the filters are consumable items, readily available and cheap to buy.
 

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The flash arrestors are not what I was talking about it is the smaller plastic housing with a piece of foam for the small amount of fresh air into the valve cover, on older models it will be a fuel filter that is used, and some times it is piped to the air filter
 
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