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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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It pleases me that you read through this thread, figured out you could repair your car yourself, and then did it. I also share your concerns about dealers. It wouldn't be so bad that they are expensive, but mine are expensive AND slow. That's unacceptable.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I had this problem on my 4.4 rhd vogue last week. Was on a long journey and noticed very hot air coming from driver vents and warm air from passenger vents. When I put the air con on the passenger side cooled a little but the driver side stayed very hot.
I read this thread and booked my car in for the air con gas to be checked before I sent it to my garage to look for something more sinister like the door blends or the coolant valve. I took it yesterday, they checked the system and it showed the gas was over half empty. Bloke told me that's enough to cause the air con system to fail.
He emptied the system, refilled it and BINGO all working perfectly again...
It was £66 in total and I'm thrilled..
So definitely check the air con first before troubleshooting anything else, you could save time and money.
 

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UPDATE:

After posting about my problem (cool on the driver's side, warm on the passenger side) we had a bit of a cool spell and I never followed up on the problem. I drive several other cars, so the A/C issue took a back seat.


Last week I pulled my FFRRSC out of the garage and drove it to work for the first time in a month and forgot about the AC issue until about 15 minutes into my drive when the car started to get hot and wouldn't cool.

Yesterday, I picked up a can of R134a (20oz with gauge) and finally decided to refill the system.

When I first tested the system, it was under 20psi. I did the 30 second bursts, as other members have recommended here, until I emptied the full 20oz can. It took a while while I filled, then measured, then filled, then measured, and on and on. The can emptied after about 25 minutes of this. My final reading was only 28psi BUT the problem was solved. The system is now blowing ICE COLD air on BOTH sides AND the rear. Hallelujah!!!

I'm just surprised that it took the whole 20oz can and only went up about 10psi. I'll have to monitor it over the next few months and make sure that I don't have a leak.

I realized one important thing... I think that these rigs deplete freon so quickly because most people keep the system on "auto" which keeps the compressor engaged at ALL times even if the heat is on or not. So the A/C compressor is running even through the winter months if "auto" is selected.
UPDATE 1 YEAR LATER: Have been using the A/C frequently for the last year - still blows strong. Cheapest A/C fix I've ever done.
 

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I had this issue on my 2004 USA spec L322 Range Rover, and for me, what solved the problem was dismantling and cleaning the heater valve (which is in the engine bay, on the drivers side - access was no problem). Aside from being a little corroded, I believe the real problem was that there was a little piece of plastic that had broken off of something somewhere else that had lodged in one of the valves making it impossible for it to close all the way - thus sticking the heat on on one side. I have had several BMW's and I can attest that when the refrigerant gets low, the air conditioning will work less well on the passenger side first. But that did not explain why HOT air was blowing when, at most it should have been ambient temp.
 

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Dear All,

I have been struggling with the same problem as many of you for some month, and became nearly mad before finding myself the solution in the end, thanks to the very useful information provided in this forum. I thought that it might be helpful for others to summarize this long and irritating process…

My car is a 4.4 petrol Vogue L322 LHD. some month ago, the system started to blow VERY hot air all the time from the right side of the car and normal, adjustable air from the left side. It was not just warmer air, but really hot, and there was no way of having it colder…

I brought it to the dealership, where the computer didn’t detect any fault, but they decided to change the FSR anyway, telling me that everything would be fine, which, of course didn’t solve the problem (as 1star2 or LarryH could tell you).

I brought back the car and they told me then that they would need to disassemble the whole dashboard to find what would certainly be a faulty flap, and that it would be a very costly process with no guarantee and the perspective of needing to change the whole thing. In the meantime, I heard about the dual coolant valve and refrigerant level problem via this very forum and I told them that this might be the cause… I was told that there was not such a thing in the car, that there was only one heater core, that refrigerant level could not be in cause and that the problem was certainly a faulty flap.

Irritated by this attitude, I decided to go to a very renowned independent land rover specialist, they first verified the refrigerant level, which was too low, and topped it up. I thought that my problem might be solved, but…. no.

Then, they checked the dual coolant valve and told me that it would need replacement because the internal seals had worn and were leaking. I saw the valve and it was true that the rubber had aged and falling in parts just by touching it. So they changed the dual coolant valve and I was then very confident that my problem was solved, but…..no!

I was a bit desperate and then decided to dig more in the information provided in this thread…

I used the idea provided by LEboyd and tested the system by putting it on MAX (in that position, the Workshop Manual says that “When maximum A/C is selected the coolant valves are held closed”) and then checked the temperature of the hoses in the engine compartment, the hose that was coming from the engine was logically hot, the hose going to the left was cold (normal), but the hose going to the right was hot, Bingo! At least the cause of the problem was then certain. But as the valve was new, it was not yet solved…

Then I used the information provided by Androulakis about the normal functioning of the valves and what to expect, I put the AC on MAX and used a tester to check what was coming out of the 3 wire connector on the valve, I had +12v on the center pin and ground on the left pin, but nothing on the right! I checked the cable and ended behind the CCM (climate control module) which is basically the module with the AC control buttons inside the car. Even if it was looking ok, the system was not providing the expected ground signal to the right, the fault was sourced, it was the CCM that was faulty.

I bought a second-hand one on the internet (new one are above 1.000 € here) and put it in the car and now everything is fine!!!

So if I can summarize what would be to me the best (and cheapest) way of sourcing the issue if your car starts to blow hot air from one side, it would be the following:

1. Start the engine when cold and put the A/C on MAX, then let the car reach normal temperature. On that position, both valves should be closed.

2. Check under the bonnet with your hand if the hoses going out of the Dual coolant valve (the DCV is accessible without problem and is situated on the left fender) are hot or cold, the water coming from the engine arrives from below the valve, then enters vertically in the Two parallel valves, if the hoses going out of the DCV are cold (one on the top left, the other on the top right), the DCV is not the problem, you can go directly to step 6. If one of the hoses (the right one usually) is hot, you know where to look…

3. First try to unclog/clean the valve, the way the valve is constructed does that the little pieces of plastic, rubber, etc… that might clog the DCV would nearly always end in the right valve. While doing this, check that the valve seals are not worn/leaking and replace the valve if needed.

4. If this doesn’t seem to solve the problem, check if the correct signal is sent to the valve by the CCM (climate control module). To do this, just unplug the 3 wire connector from the DCV, put the AC on MAX and test if you have +12 v on the central pin and ground on the two others. If you don’t have ground on one side, it might be a cut wire or a faulty CCM. If you have +12v in the center pin and ground on both side, go directly to step 6

5. To check the CCM, remove the two side panels of the central console, it is quite easy, just unscrew the two screw situated in the driver and passenger footwells and pull horizontally respectively to the left and to the right the two panels to unclip them. The CCM is not held by any screw, you can just pull it away. Test the cable for continuity, if the cable is not in cause, you probably need a new CCM.

6. If Both hoses were cold at step 2, check the refrigerant level, it is probably the cause of your problem. Please note that this is a good thing to do anyway, even if your main problem was a clogged DCV…


If I can add a small advice, it would be to test this yourself before going to a dealership, I have asked every specialist I could find at different dealerships and none seemed to know the problem, and it seems that there is no technical bulletin on that specific subject. Most didn’t even know exactly how the system was actually working, the chief mechanic of the main official dealership even told me that they never ever had to change that part there, I lost time and money for something that could be diagnosed yourself and repaired at no or very little cost…

Many thanks to all of you, the problem was solved thanks to you in the end, not the dealerships…
 

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Good job figuring it out, but a word to the wise here.

These range rovers use the same dccv setup that the Jaguars and the bmw's use.

So when the dccv shorts internally it dead shorts the +12v supply and the ground coming out of the transistor on the ccm. Unfortunately the +12v supply has a 5 amp fuse, but the ccm output is not fused, so a trace on the ccm board acts as a fusible link and burns out.

Your dccv failed, and burned the trace in the ccm. Good thing you replaced the dccv first. Now on another note, the ccm can easily be repaired. All you need is a piece of jumper wire and a soldering iron. Plus the little screwdriver bits to take apart the ccm. Me and many others have repaired the jaguar ones.

If you still have your old one crack it open and you will see what I am taking about.

Take care,

George
 

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Dear George,

Many thanks again for your help, I fully agree on the cause of the failure of the CCM (a broken/leaking DCV led to a short in the DCV that burnt the CCM in return). As I am curious and wanted to go the full route, I decided to check if I could repair the faulty CCM myself...

It happens that the Jaguar and range-rover CCM are not build the same way and it is sadly not as easy on a range-rover than on the jaguar…

First, unlike the jaguar where the connector is fixed at 90° of the PCB, the connector on the Range rover is soldered directly and “flatly” on the PCB, there are no L shape wire visible and to add to the complication, the trace on the PCB corresponding to the RH coolant valve (pin n°6 of the connector) is hidden by the connector itself: this is a dual face PCB, but, no luck, the trace corresponding to the RH coolant valve starts on the same side as the connector and under it, without possibility to see where it goes

. CCM PCB.jpg

I decided to unsolder the connector to see if the problem was lying below it and unsoldered this 26 pins connector (a painful job…), however, below the connector, everything was fine, so I followed the trace and ended on an Two channel internal power switch (ref BTS611L1), which, even if it is supposed to be protected from overload and short circuit in its specifications, was actually burnt (see picture).

Dual Switch.jpg


This is a part that can be found for around 10€ and could certainly be replaced, but as I am not an electronic specialist and knowing that I paid 75€ on Ebay for a fully functioning CCM, I decided to stop spending time and money on this…

As a general advice, I would recommend to only try to repair a range-Rover CCM if you are fully confident on your electronic skills and used to work on PCB…

Best Regards
 

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Wow... I didn't realize the different construction of the Jaguar v/s Range Rover ccm's.. They even use the same connectors. However the Jaguar has no switch / protection mechanism to fry. You end up frying the trace on the board. I agree with you regarding the difficulty of the repair for a person without PCB repair experience.

Since we know it leads there though, I'm sure you or I could repair it after we source a suitable replacement.

Take care,

George
 

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However I agree that the time and expense associated with doing so would in fact exceed the the value of a used unit priced at ~ 100 dollars or so. Compared to the 1000 price of the new one, it may be worth it.

Take care,

George
 

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I agree and that was the reason why I didn't want to go further, on top of the fact that these parts are normally pretty reliable, The chief mechanic at the main official dealership told me that, after looking in their order history, they never ever had to change a CCM on a L322 range-Rover. that led me to think that a second hand at ~ 100 dollars was a good bet...

best regards
 

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That's interesting, considering the Jaguars burn traces on CCM's with regular frequency, to the point where it's been well diagnosed and the repair procedure posted online etc. The DCCV although probably not identical, seems remarkably close, both bosch, both using the same wiring and method of operation.

The Jaguar's CCM doesn't have the power switch which you uncovered as the burned component on the CCM. The output of the transistor is directly wired to the CCM. As a matter of fact I have advised placing a small 2-3 amp inline fuse in the jumper wire used for the repair for the purposes of protecting the CCM if the DCCV were to fail again.

Now I think if Range Rover doesn't damage CCM's with the same frequency, one of two things is going on. A- Placement of the DCCV leads to less failures. In a Jaguar it's all the way at the bottom of the radiator support, so more coolant tends to come to rest there. In the Range, it's on the driver's side firewall higher in the cooling circuit. or B- that power switch which has burnt on your board actually does it's job for the most part, and protects against damage.

How long did you drive the Range with it having this condition before the DCCV was rectified?

Take care,

George
 

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That's interesting, considering the Jaguars burn traces on CCM's with regular frequency, to the point where it's been well diagnosed and the repair procedure posted online etc. The DCCV although probably not identical, seems remarkably close, both bosch, both using the same wiring and method of operation.

The Jaguar's CCM doesn't have the power switch which you uncovered as the burned component on the CCM. The output of the transistor is directly wired to the CCM. As a matter of fact I have advised placing a small 2-3 amp inline fuse in the jumper wire used for the repair for the purposes of protecting the CCM if the DCCV were to fail again.

Now I think if Range Rover doesn't damage CCM's with the same frequency, one of two things is going on. A- Placement of the DCCV leads to less failures. In a Jaguar it's all the way at the bottom of the radiator support, so more coolant tends to come to rest there. In the Range, it's on the driver's side firewall higher in the cooling circuit. or B- that power switch which has burnt on your board actually does it's job for the most part, and protects against damage.

How long did you drive the Range with it having this condition before the DCCV was rectified?

Take care,

George
Dear George,

Actually, the CCM on my Range-Rover is made by VDO, which may explain the difference with the Jaguar... and I agree with both of your suggestions, first the DCCV (which is a Bosch part) seems to fail less often in the RR that in the Jaguar, probably for the reasons that you mentioned.

Secondly, the switch probably did its job for some time before burning (it is supposed to be protected against short circuit and overload).And this might be explained by the fact that I drove the car for some month with the problem (as no one seemed to be able to solve it…)

Best regards,
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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My recently acquired 2009 Range Rover had the exact same symptoms as everybody else and a few shots from a can of R134a fixed the problem. I thought for sure it was a blend door. Thanks all!

A link to this thread should be added to the Sticky: "Faq/diy range rover l322"
 

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Hello everyone,
I am having the same cold on the left, hot on the right problem. I have a 2006 full size supercharged. I checked my freon, picked up a can with a gauge from the auto parts store. The gauge read about 30 and would not accept anymore freon. So then I moved to the coolant valve. Pulled it apart and both solenoids work, clean inside with not blockage. Tested the wire going to the valve. 12v on one wire, grounded on both sides so I know it's getting power and grounding from the climate control panel. Does anyone have any other recommendations? I live in southern california and this heat just won't die down.
 

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Well I ended up figuring it out. It was the fill tool that I was using. I tried everything else then finally came back to "what if both fill tools I used were messed up". So I went down to the auto parts store and bought the most expensive can and gauge combo (only $45). I went out to the parking lot, hooked it up and it sucked the whole can right down. Air blows ice cold now. FINALLY!!! I have no clue why the cheaper cans and gauges would not work but this solved it for me. Guess I shouldn't have been cheap in the first place and just bought the nice stuff.
 

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with air con on or off . my passenage side blowers are always cold . even with the passenage side on hot and if u turn it around to cold it gets colder lol drivers side is fine on hot or cold . RH drive by the way is that help.
does any one no what the problem could be and is it an easy fix etc

Best regards Dean
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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first thing i would do is check the freeon on the l322 models when the freeon is low it will cause this problem have seen it a dozen times
 

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I have recently purchased an 04 Range Rover HSE, the ac was hot on the right side and cold on the left just as some of yours are. I wanted to update the forum with my 100% fix to my problem. I took the advice of several members and combined them together to come up with my solution. I first started the engine and turned on the ac, I then took my infrared thermometer gun which you just point and pull the trigger and put the red laser dot on whatever you want to know the temp of. The inlet temp of the heater hose on the water control valve was 183 degrees F. and the two outlet hoses exiting the water control valve were 131 and 133 degrees F. That told me the valve was working properly. I then turned the heater on high and rechecked the temps on the hoses at the firewall and they had gone up to 183 degrees F as well. I then checked the Freon level since I work at a Ford and Gm dealership. We reclaimed the Freon that was in the system and it only had .15 kg in it. The label on the radiator support said it held .51 kg. After pulling a vacuum on the system and then recharging the system with the proper amount which is .51 kg the ac was ice cold all the way across all four of the front vents. Problem solved. Sorry for the long post but I hope it helps someone else. Thanks for all the info on this site and I hope everyone continues to enjoy their Range Rovers as much as I have. P.S. Another quick check of the A/C system would be to feel of the low side a/c refrigerant line before it goes into the compressor, it should be cold to the touch, my line was lukewarm to the touch before recharging the system, now it is cold to the touch.
 

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First, a sincere thank you to all who participate in these forums. I have been able to find so much great info on here that's saved me a great deal of time and money. Thanks to this forum I was able to switch out an alternator myself pretty much pain free at $250 after having been quoted $950 from a Euro repair shop and $1200 from the dealership. Seriously.

On to the issue that I'm hoping someone can answer:

I have been having the described issue as well: HVAC set to lowest settings, highest fan setting, cold on driver's side hot on passengers.

The problem initially began happening on and off and was accompanied by a "open book" icon on the HVAC screen which came and went.

I also began hearing the "balloon filling" sound described by others. When I contacted the dealership, they had never heard of a split temperature issue and said the repair could run into the 1000's. I didn't take it in and after a couple months of having the issue on and off it is constant now- both the error message and the hot air from the passenger's side.

So I picked up a 20 oz can of A/C Pro for about $44, watched a how to video and attempted to fill my system.

I hooked up the can to the lower valve as shown on the companies website, started her up then set the HVAC system to its highest fan setting and lowest temp setting.

I did not follow the directions on the can correctly and did not shake the can prior to use. I'm not sure how I forgot to do that, maybe the coffee hadn't kicked in yet, but I had probably drained about 20% of the can before I realized I was doing it wrong. I finished as directed by shaking the can well pretty much constantly during the rest of the fill using 15 second long bursts.

The meter read well under 15 psi when testing the system before starting her, and finished about 28 psi after having emptied all 20 oz. 28 psi is barely in the "green" part of the meter. Still blowing hot air on the passengers side.

My questions are: How bad did I screw up by not shaking the can?
Is it possible the system needed more than one can because of how long I let the problem go before attempting to fill it?
Am I doing my math correctly: The system should have about .51 kg=17.9897 oz? (If that's correct then a 20 oz can would be too much?)

Any feedback is appreciated. Its going to be a hot summer and I would make my kids very happy if I can get this problem sorted out!
 
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