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LEGACY VENDOR
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Discussion Starter #1
Guys,

I made some calibration blocks. Easy. I took 30mm steel round and plain tube.

Custom High blocks are : 185mm
Stock High blocks are : 135 mm
Stock Short blocks are : 70 mm


That thing slides in the bumpstops like the official calibration blocks.

I tried those with the Testbook I but the **** thing is dumb as a nut. It doesn't accept that i use some higher blocks (2 inches more). Out of range...

I'll test those with the EAS Suite Software soon.



Those are the high lift blocks but i do have normal high blocks and short blocks.

Strong and didn't cost me a lot.
 

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I tried those with the Testbook I but the **** thing is dumb as a nut. It doesn't accept that i use some higher blocks (2 inches more). Out of range...
it's not testbook, it's the ECU itself.... you need to modify the sensor arms
 

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Discussion Starter #3
shupack said:
I tried those with the Testbook I but the **** thing is dumb as a nut. It doesn't accept that i use some higher blocks (2 inches more). Out of range...
it's not testbook, it's the ECU itself.... you need to modify the sensor arms
Dennis, I used your sensor arms extensions.

I used the old soft Calibrate and it looks like it permits much more thing than the Testbook.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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If you apply really higher readings than the norm you will get a EAS fault, the system will revert to a standard setting embedded within the ECU, ext on rods alot less hassles...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
shupack said:
the first arm extensions were aimed at a 1" lift, need to make them longer for 2"...
Yep, that's what i done with a threaded bar for the lower link. I lengthened the upper using a stiff hose and a little bar. It works but it's too soft so it's not accurate. I'll have some welds on that project.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Say 996Turbo.....

Can I take it that "Stock High Blocks" and "Stock Short Blocks" correspond to the stock "Normal" and "Highway" ride heights? Do we also need "Access" and "Wading" blocks to calibrate the ECU and if so, can you tell me what length these should be?

Cheers guys....
 

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We've just made the calibration blocks from nylon rod.

Problem now is I don't know how to configure it!

I presume you put the blocks on the bump stops and then read the heights off Faultmate. Once you've read the heights you write them back to the ECU?

The standard blocks that are 135mm and 70mm, which heights are these for configuring?

Any advice or instructions people have got would be appreciated!

David.
 

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The "standard" calibration blocks are useless unless you have a Testbook "T4" .
The testbook takes the 70mm and 135mm blocks as datum points and using a "secret" algorithm calculates the required "point" settings for each height then writes them to the ECU and there you have it..or that's how I think it works.. :think:

HOWEVER: the LR Systems Engineering Document for the EAS states that at standard height the distance between the rear bump-stop stub and the axle pad is 105mm and 100mm for the fronts respectively. All other bump stop stub ->axle pad measurements are derived from this. Thus to calibrate the EAS properly with RSW's free software or a Black Box, you really need 4 sets of blocks to measure the point values for each height setting, then overwrite the actual points readings accordingly with these "reference values" to achieve the correct heights.

hope this makes sense

cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hoges said:
The "standard" calibration blocks are useless unless you have a Testbook "T4" .
The testbook takes the 70mm and 135mm blocks as datum points and using a "secret" algorithm calculates the required "point" settings for each height then writes them to the ECU and there you have it..or that's how I think it works.. :think:

HOWEVER: the LR Systems Engineering Document for the EAS states that at standard height the distance between the rear bump-stop stub and the axle pad is 105mm and 100mm for the fronts respectively. All other bump stop stub ->axle pad measurements are derived from this. Thus to calibrate the EAS properly with RSW's free software or a Black Box, you really need 4 sets of blocks to measure the point values for each height setting, then overwrite the actual points readings accordingly with these "reference values" to achieve the correct heights.

hope this makes sense

cheers
Makes sense. Thanks for the algorithm explanation i was suspecting. :thumb:
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hoges said:
The "standard" calibration blocks are useless unless you have a Testbook "T4" .
The testbook takes the 70mm and 135mm blocks as datum points and using a "secret" algorithm calculates the required "point" settings for each height then writes them to the ECU and there you have it..or that's how I think it works.. :think:
It's great to hear this coming from somewhere else. I been guessing this for a while now in order to explain the difference between what comes in the Testbook kit and what my Faultmate clearly is expecting.

So..... the next thing I'd love to find out is..... what are the dimensions for a set of calibration blocks for Faultmate?

Can anybody help?

Cheers
 

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I have already been down this route when I fitted a set of Gen III's a while back.
I had 2 sets of nylon spacers 70mm/135mm machined as per Ron Beckett's drawing (Landrover tool LRT-60-003) for use with my faultmate.

I soon realized they were the wrong heights and I ended up making up new hardwood blocks 100mm/105mm F/R.
This set the car level for normal ride height and gave a datum. I then set all the other heights using the difference in wheel arch height.

The nylon spacers are better because they slot inside the bump stops and stay in place when the car is raised and lowered.
The answer would be to shorten the 86.5mm dimension to make them 100mm/105mm overall.
I also can't see the point of the 10mm hole running through the spacers other than to hang them up on a piece of string.

Dave
:think:
 

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I find this calibration the most complex part of the EAS. As Malafax_dand explains elsewhere, it's nearly undoable with tape-measuring wheel center - wheel arch. What's more, I have a feeling that if I don't use the same heights left & right, as measured between axle & bumpstop, the EAS endlessly adjusts itself, emptying the tank in the process.

I only have the free EAS tool from Malafax_dand (praise be upon him) and the Land Rover tool in Ron's drawing seemed too large. I made hardwood calibration blocks by guestimating the necessary size. I still think all is not well with my EAS.

I'd really like to know the heights of all 'four' calibration block sizes, and if one has to remove the bumpstops and -bolts or not. Edit: does anybody know if these values are right?
 

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I been on a Holy Grail-esque quest for block sizes for use with either Faultmate or EASUnlock which- as we have discovered- requires heights to be sampled at 4 different levels.

No one... not Blackbox Solutions, not Storey.... NONE of the vendors of the 4-height-sampling calibration software provided measurements for calibration blocks for their own systems, leaving users to rely on the near-impossible and hopelessly inaccurate method of measuring manually from wheel hub to wheel arch.

Very very very frustrating.

But just a couple days ago, a mate pointed me to http://www.mez.co.uk/p38-eas.html and there in this little known website hiding like the rarest treasure in the world (which it probably is) were..... well.... click on the link and find out for yourself!!

Good luck, buddy... hope this helps.
 

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DarthDude said:
I been on a Holy Grail-esque quest for block sizes for use with either Faultmate or EASUnlock which- as we have discovered- requires heights to be sampled at 4 different levels.

No one... not Blackbox Solutions, not Storey.... NONE of the vendors of the 4-height-sampling calibration software provided measurements for calibration blocks for their own systems, leaving users to rely on the near-impossible and hopelessly inaccurate method of measuring manually from wheel hub to wheel arch.

Very very very frustrating.
None of this is frustrating, rare or difficult at all. the "calibration" setting are going to be different for every sensor on every rig out there. My front left may be a 104, yours may be a 109, Ron;s may be a 98.. etc. THe scale is 0-255. THe reading are different for every rig due to sensor differences, arm differences etc. THis is the very reason your save/record your setting before starting any recalinration of the system so you have a base line. Just as you always start from yoru base line when changing a sensor and calibrate from there. It really should take no more then two or three tries to gain a level setting at any height with manual calibration. The blocks only make things easier but are in no way required.
 

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Maybe you're just very very good at doing it or you're doing it wrong. Sorry but I know authorised dealer mechanics who have been calibrating heights using the wheel-hub-to-wheel-arch method since the Classic and it remains one of the most frustrating, time consuming and irritating jobs you can do on an EAS'd rangie- if you're out to do it right.

Plus, if you've just replaced a couple of failed sensors (about the only reason you'd need to calibrate the heights anyway) you don't have a baseline to start off with.

Me, I know how easy it can APPEAR to be, having been obliged to manually inflate my airsprings from my bypass kit several times during my 7 years of P38 ownership. It's got nothing whatever to do with the bit values coming off the height sensors and has everything to do with the distances between axle and chassis at each height. That the bit values coming off the height sensors will vary slightly from car to car or even sensor to sensor is a given. No one who understands the system will seriously expect the same number to appear from car to car or even sensor to sensor at each height BUT someone out to do it right WILL expect a consistent distance from axle to chassis every time the same height setting is selected. Further given that:-
1) adding air to ay one airspring affects the heights at the other 3 corners; and
2) there are variances in the distances between hub and arch even on the same axle on the same vehicle. Possible chassis warp and loose tolerances at the factory means that even if you get both sets (front and rear) hub-to-arch distances the same- a killer job in itself- it does NOT follow that the corresponding axle-to-chassis distances are the same.

The only sure way to get it right is to crawl under the car and measure the axle-to-chassis distance yourself. Using a pair of jacks to lift each end of the chassis relative to the axle in turn until you get your target distance at each corner helps make the job easier but hey.... give me calibration blocks anytime.

Jack up, insert block, drop car, save value and repeat. Beats popping under the car with a tape measure or ruler every 5 minutes any day!
 

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We must be on two different wave lengths and you simply are not grasping some of what I said. For instance when changing a sensor you absolutely have a base line. It's the same setting you had with the old sensor. One or two setting tweeks and the new sensor will have that corner level.

As far as various vendors supplying measurements for blocks for their own gear I am not sure how to answer except the blunt fact that there is no need. The blocks would be the save regardless of vender. The vendors are simply supplying a tool. It would be like buying a saw from Sears and then complaining that Sears didn;t provide you with the measurements for the wood you are cutting. Measurements for blocks have been posted a couple times including Ron's excellent write up with picture of the factory blocks with full specs. In addition the center to arch measurements have been posted various times. Bit code numbers have been provided in at least two threads that I can remember as well. It's all here... really it is.

Regarding my being good or not doing it right I can only laugh. I'll guess I am really good then. :lol: Again, I have never had an issue with measuring with a tape and adjusting the bit code to gain a level rig. On the rigs I have done they always end up within a 1/4" of being level with only a few tries. As long as the end result is a level rig who cares how I get there? :roll:
 

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the bit value absolutely does matter, which is why you need a baseline to help you out. the EAS ecu expects to see certain values for the height range its in, get that wrong and it will stray into values the ecu isn't expecting and it will fault, i've tried with a potentiometer and room for error is not a much as you might think, hence you need extension's on the sensors if you want to successfully and reliable go outside those ranges.
 

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If you are setting heights in keeping with factory settings then you would be within the software's structure and being out of range would not be an issue.
 
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