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I smell coolant on my 2003 range rover, i don't see any leaks under the hood, I've replace my coolant twice in a couple weeks. First off what kind of coolant should i use? what should i do?
 

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jad42485 said:
I smell coolant on my 2003 range rover, i don't see any leaks under the hood, I've replace my coolant twice in a couple weeks. First off what kind of coolant should i use? what should i do?

check the expansion tank for a crack/ leak.

9/10 thats what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks I' will definately check this i GREATLY appreciate your advice. where is it located?
 

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If you've not had the coolant hoses replaced by now check them as well, at that age it's worth changing them all or be prepared for them to start popping one by one!!!
 

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Monty said:
If you've not had the coolant hoses replaced by now check them as well, at that age it's worth changing them all or be prepared for them to start popping one by one!!!
I've seen a few people have had to replace hoses, but I've often wondered if the hose is just the weak part of the chain, and in reality something else is over pressurizing the system.

The cooling system is not sealed, there is a valve in the header tank cap which keeps it at a set pressure so that it doesn’t boil off, but also so that it doesn’t get too much pressure. Maybe the tiny pressure relief hole gets clogged? I've only ever had a hose pop off of other cars when the cap has failed. In theory the system shouldn’t get up to that much pressure? Does anyone know what psi the cooling system is supposed to run at?

Cars can overheat if the valve fails in the open position and doesn’t allow a build up of pressure because no pressure allows the coolant to boil too quickly.
 

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I would check the radiator carefully, when my first one leaked in the top of the core, the heat evaporated it off so there was no dripping on the floor, just a smell of burnt antifreeze.
Stewart.
 

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I wonder if these cooling system problems partly stem from the use of an electrically heated thermostat in our Range Rovers. Without the intervention of the heating element, coolant temperatures up to 113 deg. C. are ‘allowed’ by the engine management system at part load in the quest for highest possible fuel economy/lowest emissions. Temperatures like that must be quite a test on the integrity of the cooling system, especially when it’s getting on a bit…..

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I still smell it at times i'll check the radiator again and replace some hoses Thanks ALL
 

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If the car has been running at a higher temperature than expected, then it is always going to cause problems. If your engine is the BMW engine, its hoses are held in place by rubber o-rings with clips on the outside. Once these rubber o-rings start to break down (usually because of poor coolant mixtures and/or high temperature) then it will just leak more and more as the system can't hold its pressure.

As an example, a customer of ours recently purchased a 4.4 M62 engined L322. The water pump showed signs of leaking and he had coolant loss. He took it to the local dealer who told him that the pump was fine and he just needed a new radiator fitted. He has the work done, but continued with the same problems. He let us look at the car and it was obvious that the pump was leaking slightly, and that someone had tried to attempt a repair by smack the [email protected] out of the viscus nut trying to get the nut off as there were chisel marks in the nut.

When we got the pump off, it was obvious that the problems were worse than expected. The M62 has a water manifold on the back of the engine, and 2 pipes run from the back of the pump to this manifold. The O-rings in the system were shot and there was coolant leaking past the manifold at the back, such that the bolts in the back of the heads were rusted in place, one breaking off when we tried to remove it.

Investigating further, the electronic thermostat had broken and probably probably just as well in a position where it was letting coolant fully circulate. Deposits similar to a glazing effect were present all over the metal, probably as a result of unclean and incorrect/poor coolant.

This was close to a 1k job, but at least it appears to have solved the problem. Seeing Microcat's 12k for an exchange M62 engine, it is probably worth getting it checked out before it all goes wrong. I'd also suggest getting the new coolant (non-OAT type) from the dealer. You'll get a good price for a bulk 20 or 25L buy.
 

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I wonder if these cooling system problems partly stem from the use of an electrically heated thermostat in our Range Rovers. Without the intervention of the heating element, coolant temperatures up to 113 deg. C. are ‘allowed’ by the engine management system at part load in the quest for highest possible fuel economy/lowest emissions. Temperatures like that must be quite a test on the integrity of the cooling system, especially when it’s getting on a bit…..

Phil
Yes this is what is finally going to kill most of the ageing M62 engined L322s. The lack of periodic replacement of the hoses and other components in order for them to withstand the 92 degree operating temp pressure will show in engine failures on neglected cars. And since curing an engine failure can cost more than the total value of the vehicle this is no insignificant thing. Somebody should come up with a serial production of a thermostat housing that can take the regular thermostats so you can use a 82 degree one and run much cooler and less pressure. To the heck with that ultimate emission gain of the dual temp thermostat setup. The cats take care of that anyway with quite some margin. There is more value at stake in gaining years of vehicle reliability. Getting that dangerous pressure down should be high on the agenda. I have seen a custom machined job where an owner made his own housing. Get the bullet out of the Russian roulette barrel.
 
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