RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
2011 Range Rover Supercharged
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys! Glad to find this forum! I'm fixing to embark on a timing chain job for a 2011 Supercharged. It has 170k miles (but babied and maintained miles) so I was thinking of changing the full timing chain setup including cam phasers, also the injector teflon seals. What are some other 'while your there' parts?

Are there are upgraded parts that are better quality than the OEM parts?

You guys have any tips on the best way to approach this such as what specialty tools are necessary and not really necessary? I have access to a full mechanic shop but it doesnt have any Rover specific specialty tools so I need to buy some. There are several kits on Ebay but no idea if they are good or junk.

I hope I can get through this whole job without dragging it out forever! Hahaha

Thanks for any advice!
Stephen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
Hey guys! Glad to find this forum! I'm fixing to embark on a timing chain job for a 2011 Supercharged. It has 170k miles (but babied and maintained miles) so I was thinking of changing the full timing chain setup including cam phasers, also the injector teflon seals. What are some other 'while your there' parts?

Are there are upgraded parts that are better quality than the OEM parts?

You guys have any tips on the best way to approach this such as what specialty tools are necessary and not really necessary? I have access to a full mechanic shop but it doesnt have any Rover specific specialty tools so I need to buy some. There are several kits on Ebay but no idea if they are good or junk.

I hope I can get through this whole job without dragging it out forever! Hahaha

Thanks for any advice!
Stephen
Following this thread also. 2012 L322 S/C with 155k and a little noise on cold startup. But no codes yet and whisper quiet when it warms up.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2011 Range Rover Supercharged
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Following this thread also. 2012 L322 S/C with 155k and a little noise on cold startup. But no codes yet and whisper quiet when it warms up.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Mine makes terrible noise and it never gets quiet. We pulled the accessory belt off and ran it a few seconds to rule out all the externals. That should have also ruled out the s/c since the pulley wasn't turning. I'm fairly sure its the chain but as bad/loud as it sounds I'm surprised theres no codes for it. Cant think of anything else it would be, runs fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
Mine makes terrible noise and it never gets quiet. We pulled the accessory belt off and ran it a few seconds to rule out all the externals. That should have also ruled out the s/c since the pulley wasn't turning. I'm fairly sure its the chain but as bad/loud as it sounds I'm surprised theres no codes for it. Cant think of anything else it would be, runs fine.
I was told by my independent “When timing gets really bad/worn you will start seeing codes for camshaft position sensor, at that point it’s time to bring it directly in.” He went on to state that the rovers he’s seen in that condition all made it into the shop under their own power but it depends on how dangerous you’re feeling that day.

Don’t go WOT, baby it like you’re chauffeuring a celebrity, and change oil every 6,000 miles. 15k miles quoted in the manual is if you plan to discard the vehicle at 150k. Even then, there will be a timing job involved somewhere near the midpoint.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,472 Posts
Hey Stephen - Great introductory post, and WELCOME TO "THE FORUM"!!!!!!
You must be the first one to look into this, if you haven't been able to find anything that already exists.
But it seems to me that there are loads of existing info on this.
If you're just looking to re-create whole new threads that parallel the already-existing posts that I could almost swear have been on this forum for so many years, than I wish you luck in having all the forum members that have contributed so much over the years, to re-construct all that info on your specific post, dedicated to your individual question.


Have you considered searching the forum for what has already been recorded over the many years since 2011? If not, maybe at least browsing the most recent page or two of posts for any answers that you're asking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
Hey Stephen - Great introductory post, and WELCOME TO "THE FORUM"!!!!!!
You must be the first one to look into this, if you haven't been able to find anything that already exists.
But it seems to me that there are loads of existing info on this.
If you're just looking to re-create whole new threads that parallel the already-existing posts that I could almost swear have been on this forum for so many years, than I wish you luck in having all the forum members that have contributed so much over the years, to re-construct all that info on your specific post, dedicated to your individual question.


Have you considered searching the forum for what has already been recorded over the many years since 2011? If not, maybe at least browsing the most recent page or two of posts for any answers that you're asking?
There’s a reason the 2nd, 3rd (et al) threads were allowed to live - they tend to be ignored once the OP announces his or her issue is resolved. They’re treated like individual queries with a finite lifecycle: from question to answer.

Creating a new thread puts this in front of new members that may have tons of real world experience, but have not yet had reason to contribute to a prior relevant thread. “RR timing job” would be an absolute cluster of a thread if multiple people, all at different stages of the repair process, submitted questions and there was no easy way to reference what page, what post, the response to your query was on. (Not everyone uses QUOTE, not nearly enough for that to be a reliable notification).

To keep everything organized and specific to the individual and the vehicle being worked on, it’s a good idea to let each owner have their own threads.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
There is an hour long video from Atlantic British that shows you a step by step: How To Replace the Timing Chain and Related Parts On a Range Rover Sport and Late Model 5.0L and 3.0L Land Rovers and Range Rovers

The contributions I am hoping for in this thread are the Monday morning quarterbacks whose “shoulda/woulda/coulda” can benefit you. All the “might as well, while you’re in there” parts that you’ll have access to.

Wishing you the best and look forward to the personal stories to come.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2011 Range Rover Supercharged
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Hey Stephen - Great introductory post, and WELCOME TO "THE FORUM"!!!!!!
You must be the first one to look into this, if you haven't been able to find anything that already exists.
But it seems to me that there are loads of existing info on this.
Yes, I've been searching around. I'm a active forum user for other vehicles so have an idea how it works. The main issue I see with just searching for everything is that a lot of forums dont like posts from years ago brought back from the dead. Many even archive them so no one else can post.....this means questions cant be asked.

It also means if something new has happened or a better way has been thought up since a post from 2014 then it's highly likely to get overlooked.

If your picky about the same questions being asked over and over what some forums do is create a pinned post that links to very important detailed posts about various topics and how-to's. The Jeep forum does this, it works great and people can still contribute and ask questions, add newer info, etc. Its like 'the' post for that topic. It make it much more useful then expecting someone to do a search that brings up 500 threads for them to wade through, 90% of which they find irrelevant, to figure out what is considered good and current info. Organization goes a long way.

Honestly what I'd do is just end up buying what's most expensive, hoping it's the best thing and along with YouTube videos, being done with the job before I could wade through 500 posts related to timing chains.
 

·
Registered
2011 Range Rover Supercharged
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
There is an hour long video from Atlantic British that shows you a step by step: How To Replace the Timing Chain and Related Parts On a Range Rover Sport and Late Model 5.0L and 3.0L Land Rovers and Range Rovers

The contributions I am hoping for in this thread are the Monday morning quarterbacks whose “shoulda/woulda/coulda” can benefit you. All the “might as well, while you’re in there” parts that you’ll have access to.

Wishing you the best and look forward to the personal stories to come.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yeah that's a great video, I've got it and several others saved. When I found the forum, I just thought I may get a few tips or tricks type stuff. I noticed in different videos that some people have different ways of doing things and some dont use all the special tools.

I just bought this RR from a friend, got it cheap knowing it needs this repair work. I've worked on many cars and build cars so I know my way around. If I come up with anything useful that I didnt find somewhere else I'll post it.
 

·
Registered
2011 RR 5.0 SC
Joined
·
80 Posts
My tips:

Get the cheapo crankshaft lock tool, but get a high quality 36mm for the crank head as the eBay one I got actually rounded out the socket.

A torque multiplier makes the crank bolt a lot easier to get off if you have access to one

When you remove the fuel pump line bolts on the side of the engine, be careful not to strip the bolt as it strips really easily

Radiator doesn’t have to come out if you modify the crank pulley tool by cutting it a bit (will need to cut the end square again so you can turn with a wrench).

Overall the job was less enjoyable than I expected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
My tips:

Get the cheapo crankshaft lock tool, but get a high quality 36mm for the crank head as the eBay one I got actually rounded out the socket.

A torque multiplier makes the crank bolt a lot easier to get off if you have access to one

When you remove the fuel pump line bolts on the side of the engine, be careful not to strip the bolt as it strips really easily

Radiator doesn’t have to come out if you modify the crank pulley tool by cutting it a bit (will need to cut the end square again so you can turn with a wrench).

Overall the job was less enjoyable than I expected.
Is there any dangerous pressure in the fuel lines for a vehicle that is turned off?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2012 Rover Autobiography . 2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / SoldL322
Joined
·
33 Posts
What part of the country are you located in. I may have an option for you for a shop that does timing chains several times a month definitely would be worth the call to get a quotation.
 

·
Registered
2011 RR 5.0 SC
Joined
·
80 Posts
Is there any dangerous pressure in the fuel lines for a vehicle that is turned off?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Definitely - official guide has you depressurize them by pulling fuel pump fuse and hitting the starter until engine dies. Recommend Topix for all the official info, pretty cheap for a 1-day subscription.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
Also somehow I was able to download the entire 4000+ page (it’s over 300 MB file) complete service manual for the L322 with the 5.0.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2012 Rover Autobiography . 2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / SoldL322
Joined
·
33 Posts
Where did you get that from, I would like a copy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
I believe there's an upgraded design for the coolant crossover pipe. The original was 2 halves pressed together that could blow at the seam. The newer design is a single piece. No seams. May want to swap that out while you're under the hood
 

·
Registered
2011 RR 5.0 SC
Joined
·
80 Posts
I believe there's an upgraded design for the coolant crossover pipe. The original was 2 halves pressed together that could blow at the seam. The newer design is a single piece. No seams. May want to swap that out while you're under the hood
You'll need to remove the supercharger to access this pipe FYI, so not sure a standard timing chain job would make it accessible. Although tackling the supercharger does make a lot of sense to throw in.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top