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Discussion Starter #1
First, I finally got my dream Range Rover. A 2013 SC, loaded w. about 55k miles. Had a sticker of 116k new, so it got about all the gadgets I was looking for. I traded in my 2011 Jaguar XJ L SC and my 2007 Range Rover HSE to get me this beauty.

I got a good deal BUT there was a reason. I noticed right at my first test drive that the front air struts are completely defective. (There was zero dampening, lots of bounce, rattle and when I had them out, the oil ran out of the airhose hookup.) And...the extended warranty specifically excludes those. Which I was all aware off which helped to negotiate a great deal with the dealer and 4 brand new 22" Conti tires.

This being my 3rd Rangie, I thought, well, lets do the front struts once again. (Done them on my L322 in the past). Found a pair of struts. only 1000 mls on them on ebay for $ 1,000. Got them today. Rolled up my sleeves to get to work. THIS WAS THE EASIEST JOB EVER! They really completely re-designed that front axle and made a point to make it easy. 2 bolts undernieth and the 4 little ones on top. Thats it! I started in my garage at 10:15pm and was back out for test drive at 11:45pm. I mean it took me twice as much to replace my alternator on my 2007 L322. And a lot more aggrevations.

And, I didn't even have to hook up my SSD IDS software.

So, news to all the people who are considering "older" L405. Don't let the fear of defective out of warranty struts hold you back. Yes, allow for the parts which I believe are about $ 770 each strut new. BUT don't go to the stealership. If you are not the DIY kind find yourself a local Range Rover expert. I am not a mechanic. On a difficulty scale from 1-5, 5 being the most difficult, I give this a 2-3. No special tools needed either.

Can it be, they learned a lesson, knowing that these struts are regular wear and tear parts? Thanks to the LR engineers for smart engineering keeping repairs in mind for once. Any questions, let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No calibration needed. I didn't even hook up my SSD IDS to depressurize. Now a few words of caution as Topics and Alldata have you go through several more disassembly steps i.e. disconnecting the fancy sway bar. Here is what It did:
1) Lifted weight of BOTHS wheels in the front and obviously removed wheels. (That way there is no tension on the sway bar)
2) Slowly removed air hose on top of strut (under hood in the new RR) letting air escape slowly. Since these have another soilenoid controlling the front left and right separately only the air in those lines and the strut was depressurized. NOT the entire system. I didn't even take the fuse for the compressor out. Since the wheels are of the ground the height ride sensors never knew.
3) Took out bolt on upper control arm ball joint, then spread gap by gently knocking an old screw driver into gap. Ball Joint came right out.
4) Removing the larger bolt at the bottom attachment of the strut. Also spreading gap same way as before. Axle wheel carrier dropped right down.
5) Remove center wire plug (active dampening control) and remove 4 bolts on top of strut tower.
6) Strut falls right out.

Reverse the same. You will need another jack or something to help you push the wheel carrier up onto the new strut. But it was easy as well. Watch brake lines ect.

7) AFTER putting everything together and mounting the wheels do NOT drop wheel axles all the way down. Remember, no air pressure in the struts now. Just lower the jacks to lets say what would look like access height.
8) Start up engine and watch front rise to standard ride height.

Even though I have the JLS SSD IDS and other special tools I never bothered to hook it up. (because it's sooo slow).
 
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