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Discussion Starter #1
So,
I have a 1988 Classic 3.5L. For a bit about me, I know my way around 'Murican V8's (have built plenty of NA mid-HP (250-400HP) Ford, Chev and Dodge). I know how engines work.
So my question for all the Rover lovers out there is this: I am past the point of having to worry about emissions. Can I (is it worth the time/ trouble/ $$) cut out the cat, get rid of the O2 sensors, chuck the ECM and cam up a bit, get a Edelbrock, a tame 4bbl and some headers to get some more HP/ low end torque? Or would it be easier to get out the cutting torch/ welder, swap out motors all together for a <300 cubic in. aluminum block Chev?
Inquiring minds are hoping for some insight.
Thanks!
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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The most reliable Rover V8 is the 3.5L since it has a lot more material around the cylinders than its bored out cousins, the 3.9, 4.0 and 4.6. Unfortunately it is the least powerful as well. Bumping the compression to the 9.5 to 10.5 range nets some good gains. Also, you could keep the durability of the 3.5 by retaining the bore but rebuilding it with a 3.9 crank, or even a Buick 300 crank as some have done. This would be less smooth than the 3.5 though. Removing the cats, camming, headers, etc will only go so far because the Rover heads don't breathe very well. There are aftermarket heads now which really open up the possibilities for the motor. Combined with a roller cam and roller rockers, the 3.5L could be a real firebreather for its size, but then your talking big money. If you're after power the easiest and most effective swap would be to a larger Rover V8, such as the 3.9 or even a 4.6 converted to non-serpentine specs. There is a big difference just going from 3.5 to 3.9 due to the extra stroke. A carb swap won't give you extra power over the FI if both are in good shape. It will also decrease fuel mileage. It will give you a computerless engine, which has its merits. The 3.5L can be hopped up but the power gains will be in the top end rather than the lower end of the curve. As far as other swaps, the sky is the limit if you can get a GM engine in there, but such swaps are always more complicated and expensive than you think they will be in the end. Also, there is a point when the rest of the drivetrain won't be able to handle the extra power. For the stock Rover auto or manual transmission, that is anything over around 280-300 ft lbs of torque. Then there are the axles and diffs which are as capable as the transmission unless you mod them.
 

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Oh that carb stuff is so easy to work on...as far as EFI goes: '99 F150 4X4 I sold best of 14.3 mpg (even after paying Ford $230 to put in new spark plugs, K&N filter, new petrol filter, ujoints, shocks, brakes, all fluids, tyres, alignment, had 117,XXX). My '85 carbed 3.5L after A/C removed: right at 12 mpg and big gains on throttle/quicker rpms. If you do go for it Oryx, get ahold of me...I've been tinkering with different elec petrol pumps and figured out which FPR to use.
 
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