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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I have loved Range Rovers since a kid, could never afford to run one in the UK ( gas is crazy). 5 years ago and now in the US I bought a 1993 classic with the intention of having a project and ending up with my dream vehicle. Just after I bought it my wife and I saw a house for sale nearby that we could not live without, I have since spent all my time and all my money on that old farmhouse and the Range Rover has sat in the drive doing nothing. The vehicle was bought as a project and needs love but still has good potential so I would hate to part out. It has the usual tailgate issues, saggy headliner and flat paint on the roof, the main problems are the rusted out brake system, I have replaced one caliper pad and rotor set but lost much knuckle skin in the process and really don't know if I want to carry on with it.The engine, transmission and interior are still v good, Range Rover mats and workshop manual, etc. I also just bought a really nice 2002 Discovery 2 ( mid life crisis younger version maybe ! or just being practical ? ). So my question is what should I do , never used Ebay before , local Craigslist would be a waste of time ( RR owners understand ), any suggestions would be much appreciated I hate to see the RR going to waste. Located in Bruceton Mills WV
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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27 Posts
What is keeping you from driving it right now? The brakes? Or is there anything else that prevents you from using it as a daily driver while you fix her up bit by bit?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If I did the other 3 brakes (rotors,pads and probably calipers ) a quick muffler fix I potentially could but now I bought the Discovery (2002) I just can't see myself finding the time or enthusiasm. Have seen some fetch reasonable prices on Ebay so that's probably where I'm headed on this one. It really always was my childhood dream but I will settle for the Discovery until One day I will buy a RRC that someone as already done the work on.
 

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Look, a classic car (especially a RRC) needs to be your hobby and you need to like and want to spend time (and some money) on it. You dont' have a RRC because it is practical. It is not for everybody and your priorities have changed (we won't blame your wife, but all understand your situation - is tough).

Sell it, they still fetch a pretty penny and there are enough people out there willing to take one on. Ebay sure, or maybe some classic car website which attracts more serious attention but they do demand a better presentation (they don't just accept any ad). I sold a really nice '80 Mercedes on Classiccars.com for $18k with the same type of car selling for $8k on ebay. Of course my car was in really nice conditions but you are attracting a different more serious crowd on the classic sites.

The Disco 2 is nice (I had one for many years in the UK Td5 manual - very good) but all is lost after you buy an LR3 or better still LR4. These cars are just everything you want - amazing vehicle. Discovery 5 is just plain ugly looks like a Ford complete turn off. I suppose the next practical second hand car to consider in a few years in the LR lineup is the new Defender.
 

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Seconding what was said above, a RRC is a hobby, and it has to be one you love. It can still be practical too, but that's harder to justify if you have a disco, which serves the same practical niche. If it was me, I'd replace the disco with something practical that fits a different niche, like a sports sedan (practical for people and groceries, fund to drive, but no offroad/big gear hauling chops). If the range rover is a hobby, but can still serve a practical niche, it's easier to justify spending time and money on it, because it both makes you happy and serves a purpose. It gives you more excuses to use, work on, and enjoy it.
 

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If you already have the Range Rover..
Which is a blessing in itself.... and you don’t think busting a knuckle is worth it to make it ... let’s say drivable.. not a show piece... but drivable... to me it’s not just a hobby but a way of life... driveing any Range Rover classic
Is the best... it is a shame you don’t
“ have the time”
I’m sure there is somebody out there willing to take it on and drive it...
specially in Virginia ... hey they may even chop off the back and make a bobber out of it...
someone out there waiting for you to put it out there for sale...
hurry up !!
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Classic cars are definately a hobby. And they take some time and some money. However, the concept of my "Rolling Restoration" is a life enhancing hobby where I get to use and drive what I love to accomplish the day to day duties in my life. Thus, they make a practical contribution while also allowing me to drive something really cool that few others on the road are doing.Nothing that I own is a "weekend only driver". My 83 500SL, my 91 RRC, and my 93 Lexus all serve a daily purpose, are cheap to operate, and allow me to enjoy their classic qualities daily.

But that is not for everybody.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Having driven the discovery a few times now ( great car), I had a series 1 TDI back in the UK and had forgotten just how much I liked it so I have decided to put RRC back together a bit, wheels on etc, charge the battery and give her a much needed wash and put it on ebay in the next couple of weeks. RRC deserves better than I can do.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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D2 can easily be a bigger wallet buster than a classic.

Get it usable, clean it up and make some cash.
 
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