RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. New to the forum as I don't own a Range Rover anymore but I am a mechanic and I'm a little stuck so figured I'd ask the experts! I currently have a 2000 Range Rover HSE 4.6 and it's having the ever famous melting fuse box issue. I've found fuse boxes anywhere from $100 used up to $250 new and or used YIKES. I'm thinking of grabbing a used one but am sceptical about receiving a fuse box that may be only days away from failure like the current one is. My question is has anyone ever tapped into the wires coming into the fuse box (big coonectors on bottom) to move relays out of the box and bypass the printed circuit board? If not, can it be done or does the printed circuit board do other things that direct wiring to a relay wouldn't? Also.. does anyone have the pin outs or wiring diagram for the fuse panel? I've searched the service manual but can't find anything. Not sure if it's not in there or am I looking in the wrong sections? Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks in advanced!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,417 Posts
Remote mounting the relays has been done in extreme heat situations, and it is fairly straight forward.
I would however seriously consider putting in a new fuse board as by the time you put all of your labor into a "Fix" you will have more than paid the extra 100-125 cost for a fuse board that should last for the next 16 years..........
If this was your own ride, then you get to live with your repair, but as I am guessing this is a customers truck, you would not be doing them a favor by trying your work around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
There are threads on here how to repair and improve the fusebox (do a search) but as Bolt says this is not in your customers interest because of the hours you have to spend on it. Buy new (for the right model!).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replys guys. It is a customer but also a long time friend, so he's not worried about it not being factory. I'm good with vehicle electric so with a simple pin out of the fuse box under side it would be simple. Now without a pin out diagram you guys are correct, the tracing or running new wires would be time consuming. Ordered a fuse box anyway, found one for $100 so we will see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Also to go back to the other repair and improvement threads, everyone seems to buy a new fuse box and then stick male connectors into the fuse slot to relocate, or they repair the board(also too time consuming) but is there a fuse box diagram out there? Which wire does what in the connectors under the fuse box. Even if I don't go this route I'd like to take a look see
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I've been meaning to update this thread and will shortly; after a few thousand more miles everything is working perfectly. There is no discoloration of the relays and the excess heat that cracks the boards seems to be in check. To me, this is the way to go for a long term fix. And a $100 for a new fuse box is a deal. Rig it up this way and it is hardly noticeable with the battery cover on.

Best of luck.

David


http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/7-range-rover-mark-ii-p38/225890-new-fuse-box-external-relocation-rl7-relay.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,851 Posts
Hi

Download the RAVE and in the ETM you will find the pin out details and wire colours. Connectors C172 and C174 at the bottom of the fusebox. I made connections with suitcase connectors to relays outside the fusebox.

Best regards

Jos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,851 Posts
Hi

I fitted a seperate power supply to the relays with their own fuses and supply the power towards the fan motors not via the fusebox PCB anymore. This leaves the RL6 and RL7 relay places empty.

In the past I soldered parralel wires over the tracks which also worked until the connector to the fuse burned out and after that I changed to a new fusebox and rerouted the supply towards the fans.

Best regards

Jos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the help guys. New fuse box is installed, blower motors will blow you out of your seat now. Still having one issue and it seems to be a blend door not working. Can't get air to change from vents to feet or feet back to vents. But recirc door opens and closes. Any tips on where to start? Go righ for the blend door? Tricky fuse somewhere that can blow causing the issue? Thanks I'm adavned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the help guys. New fuse box is installed, blower motors will blow you out of your seat now. Still having one issue and it seems to be a blend door not working. Can't get air to change from vents to feet or feet back to vents. But recirc door opens and closes. Any tips on where to start? Go righ for the blend door? Tricky fuse somewhere that can blow causing the issue? Thanks I'm adavned.
Thanks IN advanced **
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
A little revival.

Without utilizing the hvac or blowers, (ie: RL6 and RL7 not getting power or enough resistance to make them hot) they, as well as the rest of the relays in the fuse box, are very hot to the touch after just a few moments of running around at normal temperature. What can I do to mitigate the heat. This is my second fuse board and I’d like it to be the last 🙂 I’m keen to mount rl6 and 7 externally, but could I have another issue as well that is creating these temps?

Everything otherwise runs great. No codes or testbook. Drives tip top. The blowers seem to slow down after 7 to 10 minutes of running normal a/c set at Lo. I thought maybe the left blower was cutting out at that time. I can crank them up to maximum and they seem to oblige. They just won’t stay there for terribly long. This was the impetus for my investigation. The blowers have been out and refreshed within the last couple of years. This was done when the last fuse board melted. Pollen filters are good. Both relays are new.

Thank you in advance for any ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,417 Posts
If you are using "Auto" setting, it is perfectly normal for the blowers to start at full tilt, and then slow down as the target inside temp is reached. If temps are set for "LO", and it does not blow cold enough to get there, you may have a gassing issue.
Try it on LO (and other temps) with the recirculate mode instead of Auto.
As for the heat, it is a bad design, however, if you installed a new fuse box to replace the 16+ year old one, you have another 16 years.
Several successful mods have been done over the years to improve the box itself, as well as techniques for remote mounting the relays outside. Search will turn them up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
209 Posts
Gotta agree with Bolt on this one. Even though there are many fixes floating around this site, the issue really comes down to a design flaw. Ageing and corroding connectors only makes things worse. I'm still a believer that the actual copper traces on the folded PCB are slightly undersized for the current they carry. If a new box doesn't end up lasting you very long, start to look backwards towards the blower motors. Inspect the wiring (like near the firewall) for any corrosion or damage. Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
The fuseboxes fitted to early cars were found to have a few weak spots so a superseded, but interchangeable, one was introduced for 97MY. It was then updated for 98MY and a further redesigned version for 99MY onwards. So while there are 4 part numbers, 3 of them are current and it is the original 95-96MY that was the weakest one, later ones are better. So even if you have an early car, a replacement will last longer than the original. Best excuse ever for not buying secondhand and they aren't expensive anyway.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top