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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
I parked my 1990 out on the street 2 days ago. This morning when I went to start it it fired up for about 3 seconds then sputtered out.

Had a crank but no start situation. I suspected fuel delivery issues. I jumped online and found a post talking about the inertia switch under the drivers seat, along with the relay next to that. All I did was pull out on the switch and reset it, then I pulled out and reseated the relay next to the switch.

Went to try to start and it fired right up. Does that make any sense? Could it have been as simple as resetting the inertia switch?

Also I have read posts that say the fuel pump relay is located under the drivers seat (left) by the intertia switch, and other posts saying the fuel pump relay is under the (right) passengers seat next to the ECU relay (this is a NAS car). So which one would it be for a 1990?

I am concerned the relay might be on its last legs and if so want to swap it with a new one so I don't get stranded somewhere.

Thanks
 

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Mine is a 1990/1 build. Fuel pump relayed is under my drivers seat and behind the ecu, don't know if they swapped the loom for LHD variants.

See my other post on tracking back fuel pump feed for further details of potential faults.

I did have during diagnosis of mine both an intermittent relay and corrosion on fuel pump head, the plate that seats in top of fuel tank.

Got stuck a few times before shaking out all the issues. Once had to leave it at a friends as they lent us their car to get home one night. Back the next day to retrieve. Now all ok but keep spare relay under seat in case it's needed, the original only covered 150,000 miles!
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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it is always under the right seat regardless of driver position, the relay will seat on a blue pedestal. clean all the connectors related to the fuel pump harness, the environment on which it resided is not friendly, I/E rust moisture, mud, vibration, resistance etc. are just a few issues which arise with component aging.

replace your fuel filter once a year or every 15,000 miles, a dirty fuel filter will rob volume and increase pump wear as it need to force fuel past all the dirt collected in it. pump wear leads to ohm loads on wiring which then causes wiring over heat ant this leads to electrical corrosion and subsequent early failure.
you/we have geriatric vehicles, the newest or last classic made it to the us shores in 95 that is 23 yrs of age. treat them as you would treat an elder person, with respect tender loving care and lots of medical (mechanical) attention.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Thanks for the info.

Unfortunately I have an early '90 build date truck so I dont have the easy access panel for the fuel pump. Perhaps I'll look into cutting an access for it like I've read about on here.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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if you have a 90 then it may have the steel tank, you may be right the steel tank has two pump styles early was on the side and late was on top. the later style some did have cut out some did not. good luck
 

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Crotter, better to be safe than sorry. Do the the pump the proper way and drop the tank. While the tank is out inspect it for any pitting, double check every inch of brake and fuel lines. Above all else scrub down the under carriage and give everything in that an area a triple check for rust then seal everything up. Once your fuel tank is back in you won;t have to worry about the pump, lives or rust in the rear. It is well worth the time to drop the tank.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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I think the cargo area on the my90 was the last of the aluminum, but you're correct on suggesting to drop the tank prep clean and dress the under area. specially with the rust issues.
great suggestion.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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You should also consider cutting an access hole for the pump, like the later model years. Then you won’t need to drop the tank to service the pump...


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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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Peter My friend (Gus' voice), I meant Model Year "my" not mine "my". Toad suggested the OP dropped the tank not just because of the pump replacement but to address any other creepy concerns hiding in that area, I/E plumbing, wiring, corrosion etc.

cutting the floor is a harrowing option, I did it on Shaun's red classic and making sparks an inch away from the fuel tank is not a good way to start your day...
 

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Another option is to pull the floor and address all those issues. Then fab the access hole in a safe place. That's what I did on my first one when doing the rear crossmember.
On my current one, I've thought about cutting the floor right behind the seat belt mounts and adding a piano hinge so I can access the complete tank.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Peter My friend (Gus' voice), I meant Model Year "my" not mine "my". Toad suggested the OP dropped the tank not just because of the pump replacement but to address any other creepy concerns hiding in that area, I/E plumbing, wiring, corrosion etc.

cutting the floor is a harrowing option, I did it on Shaun's red classic and making sparks an inch away from the fuel tank is not a good way to start your day...
Carlos, my friend(goose’s voice), cutting the access hole assumes the tank, is already dropped; it’s a deathwish otherwise


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If you really have to cut sheet metal in situ you can use a "nibbler" just like a pair of shears but pokes through a hole from one side to cut by hand a neat line. Or air tool alternative to achieve the same.

As Toad says though, those fuel lines that go over the tank top (mine has access and plastic tank) get corroded at extended age. The risk point on mine was where it turns to go forward along the chassis, this is accessed more by road salt coming off the rhs wheel and can really suffer from the conditions. At some point you're going to have to get there to inspect, replace or clean and protect it.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all the responses and information... Sounds like I have another project to add to my list of things to do on the truck!

-Christian
 

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As has been advised, it’s better to drop the tank, than butcher the aluminum floor section. Where it is corrugated it wouldn’t be easy to place in an access panel and seal it up properly.

Also, It’s not a great deal of effort to drill out all of the rivets and lift out the floor panel. For the small number of times that you’re going to replace a fuel pump, this is also an option.

i just put the fuel tank back in last week as part of my rebuild...
BADB51F0-E31A-49F4-9ED6-BC2AF63A11D6.jpg

9A175B0F-0F10-4808-B712-FD16BDDFD134.jpg

When I put the floor back in, I’ll be using self adhesive foam tape, so that it’s easy to take the floor out at a later date. It should hopefully be just a case of removing rivets, lifting out, then riveting back in.
 
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