RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, its a 1997 AA Yellow 4.6 HSE Vitesse. I am very attached to this vehicle, and have been keeping it in the best running condition I can. However, the front axle has been making noises similar to the old army truck axles where the ring and pinion don't mesh properly. The difference is, If I take off round a corner, there is no noise from the axle until I straighten the steering and then the noise starts abruptly. When driving and then turning, the noise is always there. When coming to a stop, the whine slows down, then becomes a growl. I am suspicious of the wheel bearings. Question, Do I order new Timken bearings, or do I order a new hub for each side. I have heard horror stories of trying to remove the old bearings. I don't think its the third member causing the racket, but I will be checking everything as soon as I can. One other thing. The front brake rotors rub ever so gently on the brake caliper mounting frame which makes me more suspicious of the bearings.
Any thoughts, hints, ideas, etc.

Waiting eagerly.

Richard
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
It does sound like a wheel bearing, but to rule out the diff, run some oil out into a jug and have a look; see if there are any metalic bits in it.

I did my wheel bearings last year and replaced all the bushes on the front while I was at it. You need all the gear and at least a 20 tonne press.

Just the Timken bearing alone is around £100 GB. I have just had a look on the Island4x4 website and they do a new hub with Timken bearing for around £200.


Replacing the hub is fairly straight forward. Problem is in most cases you can't really tell if the bearing has gone until you take it off and spin it with your fingers.

Timken are roller bearings and these were fitted originally in the factory. Some cheaper aftermarket bearings are just ball bearings and won't last.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
930 Posts
If the problem is indeed the hub bearings, I recommend going the route of replacing the entire hub assembly. I've done mine, and replacing the entire assembly made the job a relatively easy one vs unimaginable pain removing the bearing with high capacity hydraulic press.

Definitely make sure that the hub assembly you purchase comes with Timken bearings. If not, the cheap bearing will be done in less than a year of driving. Also, buy brand new axle nuts and axle seals.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the quick answers. I have been leaning towards replacing the hubs. I will definitely pull some oil and look for filings. I was going to replace the axle fluids anyway.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,079 Posts
If the discs are rubbing on the calliper carriers, how the hell do you drive it? The best argument for an annual safety check I ever heard.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Richard_G, the rotors barely touch the carriers. You can however hear it. And we have safety checks and it has never been mentioned. This too will be fixed during this repair cycle.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
167 Posts
Jack up the front and grab the wheel top and bottom. See if you can rock it. It should basically have no movement at all. It is does rock, then you have a bearing on the way out.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
So my new hubs arrived today from Atlantic British, and I unwrapped them a little to peer at the bearings and they are indeed Timken double roller units. Big sigh of relief there. As soon as the weather clears a little, let the bruising and scraping of the knuckles begin.
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,410 Posts
If you haven't done it before, you need to remove the brake caliper and then the ABS sensor. Might be difficult to get the ABS sensor out so start soaking it in (proper) penetrating fluid now.
Remove the hub bolts. The axle nut will be peened over into the slot in the half shaft. Use a lump hammer and a suitable round chisel to straighten the nut out.
You really need 3/4" socket gear to undo the nut. Even with a long pipe on the end. I knocked the hub and half shaft out with a brass hammer.
Have a look at the bearings when the hub is on the bench. Spin it in your fingers. I would save the new hub for the future if the old one is OK.
Repack with fresh grease, fit a new oil seal. Check the CV joint gaiter. Take out the half shaft and check the CV joint.
Not difficult unless it hasn't been off for 20 years.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tats

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
"Not difficult unless it hasn't been off for 20 years. " rofl
 
  • Like
Reactions: tats and Dtoyne
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top