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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The pump has finally failed, thankfully at home... It worked fine up until I did some serious snow driving, then I let it cool down and pulled it into the garage for an oil change. The lights were on and the pump had a hell of a time pumping up to pressure. While backing it out of the garage, after the oil change, it finally stopped working. So I have to ask, what are my options and is there anything else I should do while replacing/rebuilding the pump? I have thought about buying a used pump or rebuilding the old one. So I need some advice as to how hard it would be to rebuild, and if it would be worth it just to replace it. Any help is appreciated and thanks in advance!
 

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what's wrong with the pump? I posted about a rebuild regarding my bad check valve, one person responded saying that it would probably be too dangerous. There is a something on the common fixes section about an electrical problem rebuild, I think it was for a RRC, but it might help. The cheapest new pump I found was in the UK even with shipping it's cheaper than Amercian rebuilt units, also Americans do not pay VAT.

http://www.paddockspares.com/pp/RANGE_R ... _Pump.html thats about $750 US plus maybe $50 for shipping
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the help, I don't know exactly whats wrong with the pump other than it had progressively been getting louder and taking longer to bring the system up to pressure over the course of several months, it finally stopped today. If I restart the vehicle is starts running, but very rough and then stops again about 20 seconds later. I've looked at the rebuild page on the website for a RR classic, it doesn't look too bad so I will give it a shot first simply because the rover can sit since its a 2nd car, so I'm not in a huge hurry.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hi

You might have worn out carbon brushes.

I posted some info on the rebuild on the P38A and classic forums. Brushes can be easily sourced and sanded into shape.

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=31899&p=247112

Good luck

Jos
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for that post, that really helped! I did not know you could buy the core of the engine which is usually what fails. I will Attempt (no guarantees) a rebuild, and post pictures and try to make a write up for future members. One more thing, obviously when I remove the pump fluid will be every where. Are there any methods or steps to removing the pump that would minimize the amount of that highly corrosive brake fluid leaking everywhere? Thanks everyone for their help, I really appreciate it.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hi

Before you start press the brake pedal 30 times to make sure there is no pressure left at the accumulator.

Put some paper towels around the pump unit.
Then unscrew the banjo bolt and move the hose above the liquid level in the expansion tank. Tie it down on top of the tank after you slide a plastic bag over it to avoid ingress of dirt.
Unclip the connector of the pressure switch and undo the nuts that fit the assembly to the car. Remove the top metal rings and rubber pieces.
Now unscrew the supply line towards the pump from the suction side of the pump while you have the pump lifted up. The moment the hose is free, tie it down next to the tank similar as the delivery hose. This way you will spill nearly no brake fluid. Remove the paper towels and wash away any brake fluid that you have spilled as it attacks the paint and the steel will get rusty if it is left there.

Regards

Jos
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the help man, the proceedure worked really well. The pump is now out of the car and ready to be opened up :thumb: . I am having difficulty with removing the allan screws. They seem to be very tight and are not budging. I've put some anti-rust/seize stuff on it and will do a hot cold cycle on it tomorrow (blow dryer and then freezer). Are there any other hints or tricks I can use to get them unscrewed?
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Try putting it in the freezer overnight, then just heat the screws with a torch or butane lighter for a short time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have finally pulled the pump apart (what a pain) and am wondering if anyone knows where to get and how to replace these brushes inside the electric engine housing. Any help is appreciated. I attached a photo that might help, I am pointing to what I think is the brushes.
 

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Hi

You have to open the other side of the motor.
Unsolder the wires after prying off the plastic cap.
With a chissel or punch tap back the metal that is holding the taps of the cover plate in place.
Remove the cover plate followed by the rubber seal underneath.
Now the plastic assembly that hold the carbon brushes can be moved out of the motor.

The plastic pieces hold the carbon brushes. Just push them out after moving the springs out of the way.
Sand the new brushes in the same shape as the old ones but keep them as long as possible.
refit the brushes and hook the springs behind the edge of the brush holder.
Fit the unit back around the rotor and unhook the springs to get them to tension the brushes after they are around the collector.
Move the plastic in the right position there are two small round stops in the motorhousing.

Clean everything before assembly with electro clean and put some grease in the bearing. Check the bearing for movement and if necessary tap the fixing plate tighter. This is located under the brush holders. The bearing should be able to swivle but should not have free play (radial or axial).

Good luck

Jos
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have tons of pictures, but I am not sure exactly what the check valve is. Could you describe it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Could you describe what the check valve looks like and its location on the pump so I can take a picture and post it. I am also wondering if that is what caused the pump to burn up....
 

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doubt it caused your pump to burn out, my pump may run often but for very short periods of time, usually pumps burn out from being run constantly, like a bad relay or pressure switch telling it to stay on, also dont take it apart on my accord, tell me if you think it looks fixable from what you can see.

There is a check / pressure relief valve in the pump which is accessible after removing the pressure switch. You need a pair of long nose pliers with a very precise end in order to grip the valve which protrudes slightly above the body of the casting.
I found that by grinding the end of the pliers slightly on a grindstone to square the ends I was able to get a better grip. It is pressed in with an o ring providing the seal and the internal pressure of the fluid keeps it in place. If you rotate it slowly one way then the other and pull at the same time it comes out fairly easily.

There is a tiny ball which bears against a cup in the valve and I found a minute particle of dirt lodged in mine. I did open the valve but re-assembling it is critical in order to get it to work at the correct pressure so would definitely say dont do it or you may create all sorts of problems eg. too high a pressure which could destroy your system. I replaced mine with one from another pump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
doubt it caused your pump to burn out, my pump may run often but for very short periods of time, usually pumps burn out from being run constantly, like a bad relay or pressure switch telling it to stay on, also dont take it apart on my accord, tell me if you think it looks fixable from what you can see.
Thanks for the help bud. I posted another picture of what I think is the relief valve. From what I can see, it looks normal, but then again I don't really know what normal is :think: . I haven't pulled it out because I am a bit scared I might mess up and according to your quote, it needs to be perfect otherwise I might mess up the whole system.[attachment=0:1efpirok]102_0504.JPG[/attachment:1efpirok]
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The pressure relief valve I described is what is shown in your photo. It works by opening when the pressure gets too high causing the brake fluid to recirculate within the pump itself. This will happen if the relay sticks on or like in my case the valve itself fails due to contamination. Either way the pump will run continuously till it burns out.

Removing it is no problem - its only if you dismantle the actual valve that the problems will arise. When I removed mine I used a jewelers eye glass magnifier to inspect it and noticed the dirt lodged next to the ball holding it open. It is very small and difficult to see the parts clearly.

Testing it accurately is next to impossible without specialist equipment but I could blow through mine. The hole is tiny but if it is not sealing you will notice it by blowing.

Furthermore if the pump simply wears out due to its age and usage it will not produce enough pressure to trigger the pressure switch and will run continuously.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I really appreciate the help. I guess I'll take a look inside, I just need to go get some really fine needle nose pliers. As far as the symptoms went. The pump engine just seemed weak. It ran very rough and would intermittently stop and if I hit a bump it would start back up. This failure did happen gradually and was finalized when I did some donuts and figure 8s in the snow :). The pump did actually succeed in getting the system up to pressure even when it was weak. Previous to that it worked fine and would always bring it up to the correct pressure and would run for 2 seconds every 3 to 5 minutes or so. It did take it awhile to bring it up to the correct pressure after it sat for more than 4 hours (roughly 40 seconds to a minute before the lights would extinguish) I suppose that is the accumulator going out. Anyhow I will try to get those pliers and pull that little piece out and let you know what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
DAMNIT DAMNIT DAMNIT DAMNIT!!!!!! :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil:

While trying to get that relief valve out, I noticed something where the accumulator used to be....[attachment=0:360aizx5]brake.gif[/attachment:360aizx5]
 

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