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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
Fitted a snorkel, no one makes one that I can find and after fitting one I can understand why, there is not a lot of room.....

I had a look at a Disco 4 and the rake of the windscreen and the clamshell bonnet are virtually the same as the L322 and it looked like a snorkel for a Disco would fit with some mods,

First job was to remove the wing and take a look at the space available, not much is the answer. The Disco, being on a chassis doesn't need such strong inner wings but the L322 has a lot of strength here and the gap between inner and outer wing is much less. The good thing is the original intake from the wing into the airbox and on into the engine is pretty well sealed, there are rubber "O" rings on the joints to the airbox, the box itself is pretty water tight, as are the joints to get to the inlet manifold, certainly good enough for the type of wading it will be doing, if you were going to try some Camel Trophy type wading with your head out the window just above the water level then it may need more work, mind you so would everything else on the car......

Inner wing with air intake



You can see here the limited space, the plastic wheelarch cover shows how close the outer wing is to the inner wing



Next job was to make an elbow to take the inlet back to the snorkel, the hole in the inner wing is around 3" diameter, but a 3" hose wont fit inside the inner wing so I made up an elbow that used the entire space available, the outer wing reduces in size from bottom to top and from front to back, I made this to accept a 4" intake pipe that is squashed to an oval inside the wing and I was hoping would allow enough airflow.

First rough mockup





Then some cleaning up and filler work, a quick check on fitment, it has to fit within the inner wheel arch plastic trim and it just does



Finish it off to a standard that is easy to take a mold from

 

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Discussion Starter #2


Then take a mold off it to produce the final elbow, I didn't want to use the buck as it had got rather thick to get the correct shape and was made from plastic, filler and fiberglass....





Then made the final elbow, doesn't have to be as polished as the buck....





It has to be this weird shape to maximise the airflow

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Fitted to the car



Then fit the snorkel to the front wing, out with the drill and jigsaw....





I had to enlarge the hole to aid fitting as it's so tight and forgot to take a pic of it, just maximised the size out to the fitting holes...

Also fitted the grill and cut this as well....



Then fitted the new elbow with the air inlet pipe, this is two layered silicon hose with a metal spiral so holds it's shape and is bendable.. Used Tiger seal to attach and seal the elbow to the inner wing



 

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Discussion Starter #4
Then refitted the wing, pulled the pipe through the hole and fitted it to the snorkel, then had fun trying to get behind the wing to bolt the snorkel to the wing with the pipe in the way, was rather fiddly but managed it in the end.

Had to make a bracket to fit the top of the snorkel to the "A" pillar, it was missing, made it go underneath the "A" pillar trim so as to keep the door seal working as it should. Cut a small slot in the trim to fit it...



And that was the fitting finished.... then on to the aesthetics, not that they look that nice anyway, more function than form but this one had "Discovery 3" on it and it looked a bit funny with half the "so called" air intake vents poking out from underneath...





So to neaten it up I ground off the logo



Went over it with the D.A. sander



Also sanded off the awful plastic flash line it had all the way down the front...

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Then plastic primed it and painted it with truckbed liner, hopefully it will last, moved the side repeater to the cut out (this is for the wheel arch on a Disco) and painted the side vents body colour which I think looks better....







Painted the other side vents as well...



The finish looks better than standard but this is one of those cheap Chinese copies..



I had done some testing of the short term fuel trims before fitting it all so had something to compare with to see if the airflow was restricted, at 70mph they are between 1-2% higher so this would indicate it's getting a ram air effect at this speed and is in fact getting more air in, there is no noticeable drop in performance in acceleration. I fitted the innards of it all whilst visiting my Mother during the week as my brother was around to help with an extra pair of hands and it is about 220miles from where I live... It used slightly less fuel coming home than it did going so I think the airflow is fine.... If you cover the top of the snorkel it sucks in the pipework and stalls the engine so it appears to work well....
 

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Fitted a snorkel, no one makes one that I can find and after fitting one I can understand why, there is not a lot of room.....
That's not the reason... It's because if you're wading deep enough to justify having a snorkel the electrical components on an l322 would have already failed and the car would be marooned. I know from experience you don't even want water creeping near the headlights let alone creeping up to the door jams/submerging all the parking sensors, air suspension sensors, alternator, electric fans etc etc etc ^10th. I think the manual outlines wading depth at 18 or 22", that's about it all the car can do without causing damage.

Also regarding your MPG bump... I wouldn't say it's a, "ram air effect," so much as the fact the maf is clocked/calibrated to read a stock intake... I bet your bump in MPG has more to do with a vortex going on in the plenum which isn't letting the maf account for the full intake charge... That said you've got more air going in per kg of fuel which ends up leaning the engine out... More power, better MPG... The downside is if it's too lean you end up causing internal damage to the engine. At slow speeds it probably doesn't matter.

It does look sweet though and the install is top notch... I only mention these things as I'd hate to see you forde 3' of water and it not turn out well for you... It's a little different than slapping a snorkel on a defender or a stripped down d1
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the comments, some interesting points,

I bought this as it's much cheaper than a 90 and I don't fit in one of them anyway, it's also like off roading in a Limo....

About 2 months ago we were in South Wales doing some lanes, we had been informed that the river crossing we were doing was under 2ft deep.... stupidly I took this as read and was first in (without a snorkel) I was at off road height (have IID tooled off road height to be 2 1/2 inches above stock) we got about two car lengths in, at just the right speed to push a bow wave, unfortunately the water was now two inches up the windscreen so more like 4ft of water, it was pouring through the heater intake, nothing else for it but floor it and hope for the best, we started to get through it but the engine took a gulp of water and died, we were now in about 3ft, it was half way up the doors, by the time someone else had managed to pull us out we were pretty well sitting in a Jacuzzi, the water was at least a foot deep inside the car, after getting out and draining the water out and disconnecting the airbox from the MAF it started again and we finished the days laning. There were several spurious things happening with the electrics but it didn't let us down and even drove the 220 miles home again.

I stripped out the complete interior



still had water in it



took all the ecu's and ICE out of the car, stripped and cleaned them then left them in the airing cupboard, dismantled every multi plug, then left the car for a week with a dehumidifier inside, after it had all dried out properly I put it all back together expecting an array of faults but, none showed up.

The radio, amp and TV box were destroyed but everything else worked fine, the BECM although in a stupid place under the passenger seat was totally under water, it is pretty well covered in thick lacquer and worked fine.

The air suspension pump had sucked in water so I stripped and dried the dryer, emptied the system several times until it was free from water.

The only other casualty has been the starter, it is well sealed on the outside but not on the inside, inside the bellhousing, it took in water and 7 weeks after the swim started to make some awful noises, it was full of rusty water as the water couldn't get out, even with the vent tube... a new one has been fitted and modified with a drain hole to help nextime, what is weird is that it's well below the standard wading depth anyway....

I have removed the viscous fan and installed a twin electric set up from a Jag,, that should help as well. The alternator on the V8 is sealed. The suspension sensors are again well below the standard wading depth and have shown no signs of problems. There was no water in any of the oils...

My parking sensors stop working when it rains so, yes, they got a good soaking but they still work now on a sunny day...

I have soaked every electrical thing I can find in Corrosion X, it is excellent at shedding water and is dielectric so safe on delicate electronics, hopefully this will help.

I know they are more delicate than a 90 or an early Disco but I wanted one for off roading, it will be a learning curve, I am willing to learn by my mistakes and don't think it will take much more to get it where I want it....

I don't think the snorkel would create a vortex in the plenum, it's got to go through all the original pipework and the airfilter and any disruption in flow would have be smoothed out by then. I wasn't measuring the MAF I measured the STFT so this is showing the mixture as it leaves the engine, they were 1-2% lower (still on a positive reading) so the system is not having to deviate from the stock fuel map so much. It won't run lean as the system won't let it especially with the several knock sensors on the engine.
 

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seems like you can fix it even if you do submarine it, so def post a vid next time you're wading :)

As far as the a/f I'm still skeptical, that piping creates a lot of turbulence even after its in the air box... true it does have knock sensors but you can still grenade an engine with knock sensors. Then again its a 6000pound suv and not a race car so you're prob fine unless you're doing WOT runs to 150.

Nice work regardless, looks cool :)
 

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Very interesting, Pete. Be sure to keep us updated s you find the wade-ability of our RR's.

I too would not worry about the mixture. The O2 sensors will compensate at part throttle, and I would think they would show a lean code if there were an issue. You are likely getting cooler air to the engine.

We need a pic next time you draft 4 feet!
 

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You have one of the only L322s that I really like!

I don't know if it's the lack of tint (all the U.S. ones have tint), the color combo, the painted side vents, the off-road-look instead of the rapper-look, or all of the above but . . . wow!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks chaps, off to the Lake District in a few weeks, if the weathers wet there are some good rivers up there....

Nico3687... here's another pic for you.... the mean look....

 

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Great write-up and great pictures, Thanks for sharing your experience in using the rover as a "submarine".
 

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Nice work. In my experience L322 is more likely to get water damaged from rain/sunroof vs wading. They are very solid off road, although I have the jag ediff version.
 

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Heylands, awesome write up and outstanding work! I love the fact that you drowned your RR and then dried it out. Once I get another (MkIII) I was thinking of doing the same thing to mine and this is a really good step by step. I have drowned my 72 Series III Tdi many times but it just keeps on going. Drowning my MkIII would be very scary. I have off roaded it many times but never water so deep.

Keep up the posts with any mods you do. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I love the fact that you drowned your RR and then dried it out. Once I get another (MkIII) I was thinking of doing the same thing
I don't recommend it `) `)

I have got plans for it but I'm waiting for 2 new hips and a new knee, following a back injury years ago.... long story....so I'm a bit limited in what I can do at the moment... get them sorted and I'm away with big chunks of metal and the welder....
 

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Hey Pete!

I am new to this forum all the way from Australia! And i am in the planning stages of setting up my 2003 Td6 L322 for some touring, and on many of our famous tracks there are some seriously deep rivers to cross... and this is number one in my bookmarks list for L322 prep!

Great work!
 

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Great snorkel haylands, should take into account the mass production for model L322, look great and most important is that is also useful. :clap:
 

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Just read this storey. You are a real craftsman and a trooper to boot. In spite of your back you are still giving a lot. I wish you a speedy and strong recovery with those surgeries. You have provided optimism for those of us heading in a similar direction
 
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