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Discussion Starter #1
Is there are functional difference between these devices? I understand the Faultmate is VIN specific and costs more, but does it do more?

Thanks in advance.
Greg
1998 RR 4.0 NAS
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response. I am familiar with the website and the information found within. I was hopeful that someone who has used each of the products could give me a 'real world' experience.

A little back ground: I currently own a 14 y/o vehicle with 138,000 miles that for most mechanical issues I am comfortable addressing. With the help of this website and RAVE I have fixed most of the common problems on my truck. Those things that I cannot do in my garage I have a local mechanic who can help me. The problem is no one in our community has the capability of 'communicating' with my 1998 RR's electronics beyond fault reading. The closest dealer is 2 1/2 hours away. Currently I have a 'hot start' issue. This has not been cured with a tune up- plugs, wires, new O2 sensors. I have cleaned the MAF, IACV. Replaced the coolant temp sensor, fuel temp sensor. This has helped the idle and hot start issue 'a little'- but has not cured the problem. I have read everything I can on this Forum about this issue and has lead me to the above issues. So in the process of trying to determine what to do with this vehicle ie: keep it and try to figure out what is the issue. I am to the point where if I am going to invest in a communication tool I would like it to do 'something' besides tell me a code.

So I would like to know is there a big difference in functionality between the two devices based on the experience of someone who has used these products.

Once again thank you in advanced.

Greg
1998 RR 4.0 NAS
 

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Keep in mind that when it comes to the engine most any code reader is going to tell you the same thing. If there are no codes then there isn't much they tell until you get into real time data. Even then it all boils down to trouble shooting. The BBS products are terrific for the various systems and obscure settings you will play with a few times. However all diagnostics gear is simply another tool. No disagnostic gear is going to tell you where there is a dirty connection, weak signal or loose ground.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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AFAIK, the Nano deal only reads and resets faults.
The full blown MSV will allow you to change data etc too.
I agree with Carl though, a GOOD code reader will display live data as good as the MSV will, as they are reading the same stuff aren't they?
The adaptive reset has to be the most handy feature on the MSV where the engine ecm is concerned.
I have a MSV for the P38, and will probably get the software for the new L322 we just got. Yes it's expensive, but once you have used it, nothing else on the market comes close (that I have found).

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks again to all who have responded.

Martin- thanks for your real world experience with the products. I believe the Nanocom allows for adaptive resets based on the videos provided on YouTube by BBS.

Greg
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Having owned the MSV system for some years, I can honestly say I wouldn't be without it.
If the Nano fits your needs though, I say go for it!

Martin
 

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Gentlemen, let's not confuse the Nanocom with the FaultMate MSV-2 NANO... they are two very different beasts, and both sold by BBS.

The FaultMate MSV-2 NANO is the cheaper version of the FaultMate MSV-2 EXTREME, and does not have a LCD screen. It can be purchased as a single vehicle unit, locked by VIN and can hold up to 3 different vehicles if you licence it approporiately. It can also be licenced for multi-vehicle use at a cost. The FaultMate MSV-2 NANO must be used in conjunction with a Windows PC/Laptop running the BBS Vehicle Explorer software.

I started out with a FaultMate MSV-2 Nano for my P38 a few years ago and loved it. I upgraded to a FaultMate MSV-2 EXTREME to allow me to perform some diagnostic functions via the LCD screen, and added a licence for my TD4 Freelander, then some multi-vehicle licences when another P38 was added to my garage.

Then BBS bought out Mattia who had been selling his Nanocom product to Defender and Disco 2 TD5 owners...

As I was a distributor of BBS kit in Australia, I purchased a Nanocom Evolution to play with, even though I didn't own a Defender or Disco 2. My mates who did tought it was pretty cool.

BBS redesigned the Evolution to create the very sexy Nanocom Evolution II and added P38 support. This is a brilliant tool and I use it almost exclusively on my P38's in preference to the FaultMate these days. It is licenced according to the type of P38 (GEMS, Thor, Diesel) not the VIN, meaning you can use it on any P38 within that engine type. My own Nanocom Evolution II is licenced to all types of P38's, Disco 2 (V8 and TD5), and Defender (TD5 and PUMA).

As far as I can tell, the only thing that the Nanocom Evolution II does not do that the FaultMate can do (if licenced, and with the extra cable and much resoldering of connectors) is to totally reprogram the BeCM for a new VIN and reset the odometer.

If I am going on a road trip or off-road, I take my Nanocom Evolution II.

BTW: I do not sell MSV-2 or Nanocom these days, so have no commercial interest :)

Cheers, Paul.
 

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+1 to Paul.

The Nano is great but very cumbersome to carry around in the car, and the cabling is irritating, not to mention the need for a laptop.

The Nanocom is a beauty and fits snugly in the glove box ...
 

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So when I am right, the only difference between the EvolutionII and the Faultmate ist the possibility of the Faultmate to work on the BeCM when you have paid for the special licence?

Frank
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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The module to reprogram, unlock, etc the P38 becm is SM035 from BBS.
This HAS to go with the Faultmate AFAIK, and not the Nano etc.

So when I am right, the only difference between the EvolutionII and the Faultmate ist the possibility of the Faultmate to work on the BeCM when you have paid for the special licence?

Frank
 

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Just my .02..I bought a Nanocom Evo II last spring and have upgraded the firmware twice with no issues. I only drive my rig on weekends and after work so I have not had much time to play around with this unit. The one thing that I think the EVO II has that the Faultmate may not is the overtemp alarm. WHen I first got my EVO II I set it up for instrument mode and set the overtemp alarm for 85 deg C. While I was driving it this evening the alarm went off..there was a visual and audible alert that I had exceed the threshold set in the overtemp alarm screen. I just had set it too low but I thought that is a great feature as our rigs don't like to be overheated..
I sold a Land Rover Gun case that came with my Rig to help pay fot it. The guy who bought it on EBAY got good deal..and I got my Nancom Evo II...I recommend having one.
 

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enbruchman wrote:

The one thing that I think the EVO II has that the Faultmate may not is the overtemp alarm. WHen I first got my EVO II I set it up for instrument mode and set the overtemp alarm for 85 deg C.
Are you talking about a p38? I have got a Faultmate and there no overtemp alarm as far as I can see. Also what is instrument mode?
 

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The Nanocom Evo II has an overtemp alarm function. You set the overtemp threshold at a desired point..say 90 deg C (default) and if the unit detects the coolant level going over that threshold, it flashes an alarm on the screen and sounds an audible alarm. The BBS guys have designed this unit for in car operation as it is powered from the OBD II connector. I have it mounted above the radio in the open space next to the clock.

There is also an Instrument screen(s) that displays current operating conditions like voltage, speed, etc and can be configured to be displayed on power up. Overall a nice little unit that provides a level of confidence in driving my rig. I will try to put some pictures of what the above 2 screens look like...if you desire..

Erik
 

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Erik,

Yes. A picture is worth a thousand words.

Dave
 

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OK..here's some pics
Ela-20121019-00702.jpg
This is the start screen of the Nanocom Evo II..I just started the Rangie so coolant temp is low
Ela-20121019-00705.jpg
The next screen in from the start screen ...note the slider on the bottom has moved over 1 space
Ela-20121019-00709.jpg
The coolant alarm set up screen..I have it set low to show the alarm..
IMG-20121019-00714.jpg
The alarm screen activated due to overtemp...note the Ryder cup hat...the Nano is beeping until I acknowledge the alarm..

If you want anyting else let me know..I take more pics..
Colin from BBS gave me 5% as I was a rangerovers.net member..If I had more than 50 posts, I would get 10% off..

Erik
 

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Cool.

Thanks
Dave
 

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It would appear that the Evo is entirely standalone and does not interface with a PC aside from an SD card, is that right? What data can be logged to the SD card and in what format?
 
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