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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #1
On my second RRS TDV8 I have been experiencing excessive wear on the inside of the rear tires.
The tire shop had checked the alignment when fitting the new tires but after about 8,000km the toe out was close to - 8 degrees on both sides.
It has been stated that when I tow a caravan I may experience a change in the camber and toe due to the extra weight on the rear of the vehicle.
I understand that the automatic levelling should overcome this, but I am still experiencing this wear problem.
Has anyone else experienced this concern? And is there any advice on just what to do about it?
 

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An easy explanation is that your "shop" is using the old specs for your alignment. There was a service bulletin released with new specs due to rear tyre wear. There are a few existing threads on rear Sport tyre wear that should give you the bulletin info.

Another option is that you have some worn components back there.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well what a complex issue this is! The tire people asked if I would have the car checked over to see if there is any wear around the rear end which might explain what is causing the excessive wear. This was completed yesterday and the vehicle came through with flying colours. My service guy is suggesting that there could be a number of reasons for the rear to be out of alignment:
a) The car might have been at the wrong height when doing the alignment checks.
b) The car had been on a hoist to fit the new tires and the levelling might not have returned to normal height when the alignment was started.
c) The tire shop might not have the latest data, or ability to align the wheels properly.
So now I am left with excessive wear on fairly new tires and I cannot see how the tire supplier (Bridgestone) has any responsibility because the excessive wear appears to have been caused by alignment problems.
I did some calculations on just how much weight I have on the rear of the vehicle when towing my caravan.
It seems that I am overloaded (according to the numbers in the manual) by approx. 200kg on the rear of the vehicle. I have a lightweight boat on the roof and a 10hp Outboard Motor in the back. Along with all of the bits and pieces that are required to use the boat, the total calculated weight on the rear is 1,945kg whereas the manual says 1,710kg. This may be a contributing factor, but I am not sure how I will ever know if this is true unless I tow the caravan, but leave the boat at home for about 10,000 km and have the alignment rechecked.
If anyone has similar experience with this concern, I would appreciate a response.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Have you also checked
Condition of your rear control arm
Bushings ? If worn - those can cause excessive wear (and clunking )
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #6
I had the workshop, where the vehicle is serviced, check the rear end for any worn parts and they indicated that it was in excellent condition. I have discovered that the tire supplier set up the alignment to the wrong specs (different model) and this may have been the issue???? Have now fitted 4 new tires and had the alignment set up to the correct specs. Sold the boat, so have reduced the weight on the back end. Will see how things go now.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #7
It seems that when the wheels are aligned at "normal" height and I go out on the road and get up above about 80 kph the vehicle is adjusted to a lower height and therefore the wheel alignment is changed by this action for which I have no control or indication that it is happening.
My tire guy suggested to do the wheel alignment set at the lower ride height so that the wheels will be aligned when I am above 80kph.
I have been suffering from excessive tire wear on the insides of the rear tires and am hoping that this change will overcome this concern.
By the way, I am towing a caravan with a ball weight of 240kg which is putting some stress on the rear tires.
I will get it all checked after I return from a trip with the caravan and will let you know the results.
 

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It seems that when the wheels are aligned at "normal" height and I go out on the road and get up above about 80 kph the vehicle is adjusted to a lower height and therefore the wheel alignment is changed by this action for which I have no control or indication that it is happening.
My tire guy suggested to do the wheel alignment set at the lower ride height so that the wheels will be aligned when I am above 80kph.
I have been suffering from excessive tire wear on the insides of the rear tires and am hoping that this change will overcome this concern.
By the way, I am towing a caravan with a ball weight of 240kg which is putting some stress on the rear tires.
I will get it all checked after I return from a trip with the caravan and will let you know the results.
I've never heard that the L320 lowers at 80 KPH (~50MPH). Is there some documentation you can point me to?

I know it will goto normal height from low/high when you exceed a certain speed automatically. I've also read on hear that when traveling over 157 KPH (100 MPH) that the vehicle does lower slightly. I doubt though that the lowering when you are over 100MPH impacts the geometry in a way to make the vehicle less stable.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Off-road height
This is 55 mm (2.2 in.) higher than On-road
height. It provides improved ground clearance
and approach, departure and break-over
angles. See DIMENSIONS, 292.
Off-road height can be selected at any speed up
to 40 km/h (24 mph). When the system is at
Off-road height, the system will automatically
select On-road height if the vehicle speed
exceeds 50 km/h (30 mph).

High speed height
This feature lowers the suspension ride height
by 20 mm if the vehicle exceeds 160 km/h
(100 mph) for longer than five seconds. This
action is automatic and cannot be over-ridden.
Ride height will return to normal when vehicle
speed remains below 130 km/h (80 mph) for 30
seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have had new tyres fitted and the alignment set at the low height adjustment level. Then towed a caravan for 5,000km before taking the RR back for an alignment check. The tyre wear seems to be very uniform and the wheel alignment was already within specs when checking the alignment.
So, I don't know for sure that the vehicle runs any lower when I am out on the highway at a maximum of 100kph (60mph) but I seem to have overcome my original problem with tyres scrubbing badly when towing the caravan. I can't see the benefit of the vehicle lowering by 20mm when travelling above 160kph because when does anyone get up to that speed and stay within the law. I will now have to find out more about ride heights at various speeds.
 

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AR.

Could you please double check the spec's on your Bridgestone tyres or your replacements - as I've heard similar stories with other vehicles ?

This includes a brand/name of where the tyres were made, the size, speed rating letter and load index number situated on the tyre sidewall !

Recent evidence suggests inferior branded rubber manufactured in second or third world countries is not lasting the distance at great expense.

Cheerio,


Vinniman.
'88 Hi-line
Perth, W.A.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My current tyres are actually Pirelli, not Bridgies. So I don't suspect inferior rubber.
I really believe that it is an alignment problem when towing my caravan.
Time will tell if this is true.

AlanRW2
 

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AR.

Your second TTDV8 Rangie is likely shod with 20" rims and 275/40R20 Pirelli tyres which can explain the excessive tyre wear to some extent !

The load index/pressures on those original tyres was probably not meant for the types of loads you were placing on the tow ball weight.

Apparently driving in off-road height puts tyres at zero degree scrub radius (i.e. tyre sits exactly vertical) as a method for uniform tyre wear ?

My father just replaced his year old Yokohama's which were made in the Philippines that had worn down to the steel carcass in 10000 miles.

Cheerio,


Vinniman.
'88 Hi-line
Perth, W.A.
 
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