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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys.

Question is, has anyone tried Evans high performance waterless coolant in the RRp38. I know the RR is abit sensetive comes to the heating system and the combined plastic/ aluminium radiator is also not the most reliable part on the car.

So will it be safe to use the Evans waterless coolant to avoid the possible water pressure build up. Has you guys any tought about this.

Yes, I know it`s expensive, but that is not an issue if it`s doing the job superior.

Link:http://www.evanscooling.com/


Comments.


Best regard Brage
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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I don't know of anyone who has tried it yet, no.

I would consider it at some point as a 'guinea pig' but, the cost of it is fairly prohibitive at the moment - especially as I changed my coolant not long ago. Maybe at the next time I flush/change the coolant I'll look into it if funds allow.

If anyone else has tried it and had success/failure with it, then it would be interesting to know about too

Marty
 

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I used it ages ago in a 427ci stroked 351W block in an old Ford Mustang that had heat issues. Worked well, but it kept the normal operating temp at like 280 which would boil the gasoline in the carb.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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If your cooling system is in good condition you shouldn't need anything other than anti-freeze and water at the correct mix. Spend the money on fixing the fault rather than trying to cure a symptom.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If your cooling system is in good condition you shouldn't need anything other than anti-freeze and water at the correct mix. Spend the money on fixing the fault rather than trying to cure a symptom.
It`s not like I have a problem, just curios - reading the advertising it seems like a good product. It`s looks like it can eliminate potensial heat issues even in an healty engine, like afterboil an things like that. And i know the guys running Diesel engine often have heat issues when engine working under heavy loads.

Just thought maybe it was a better product than the original coolant / water mix, me running LPG an all.

That 1.6 bar operating pressure is somewhere down the road stressing the parts into fatigue. Evans coolant will, IF it works well, by no doubt prolong the life of all the components in the pressurised system by its stress relief.

So it could be well spend money anyway.


Best regards Brage
 

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Interesting concept but the makers web site is short on important technical data and overstates the oxygen corrosion and other issues.

Its a sealed system so once the entrained oxygen has been taken up either by corrosion or by the inhibitors no more will get in. Its close to a non issue on daily driver vehicles doing decent miles with regular anti-freeze change.

The localised boiling and cavitation thing is rather overdone too. If it really were a serious problem engines would be destroyed in very short order. Cavitation is more problem with much bigger engines where large water passages allow unstable turbulent flow to develop. Car engines generally have passages that are too narrow for the problem to develop at the relatively slow flow rates involved.

Evans carefully avoid any figures concerning heat capacity per unit weight and volume of the fluids and efficiency of energy take up from surfaces in contact with it. Water has one of the highest heat capacities per unit mass of any common fluid and wets most surfaces effectively so heat transfer is good although you do need to ensure that things keep moving. Gycol and other good anti freeze additives tend to improve wetting which helps offset any reduction in overall heat capacity due to less water being present. Methanol, a popular mainstay of cheap anti freezes back in the good old days doesn't do much for wetting and can enhance corrosion. Good reasons why its not used now.

The really nice thing about water is its high latent heat of evaporation which means you need to push a lot of energy into it to make it into steam even after its actually got up to boiling point. In the interwar years Rolls Royce and other aero engine makers did considerable work on steam cycle cooling of aero engines. Partly to reduce the weight of water needed in the cooling systems and partly as an attempt to reduce the pressure at which the cooling system had to be run. Basic idea was water passing through the block turning to steam in the hot parts of the cylinder head. Worked quite well on the test bed but in real life very problematic. If the steam / water flow got itself muddled up engines would be destroyed in very short order. As in holes punched through cylinder head castings damage.

The high boiling point of the Evans fluid is all very well but if the heat capacity is insufficient at the design operating temperature the engine will end up running hotter which may not be a good thing. Fact is our pressurised cooling systems are by design stabilised around the boiling point of water. Oversimplifying when working hard the extra heat is taken up by the latent heat of evaporation not by increasing temperature. A purely liquid cooled at zero overpressure motor will have larger temperature shifts between different operating conditions unless the thermostatic control is re-jigged to suit. Not sure that I want the actual operating temperature of our V8's wandering around as the head gasket and overheating issues are primarily due to things shuffling around as they warm up and cool down.

Bit different to the notorious Leyland K series which simply doesn't carry enough water so there isn't enough latent heat of vaporisation capacity to cope when temperatures go awry.

The calculation needed to figure out a reasonable idea as to what is and what could be going on are monumentally tedious but not intrinsically that difficult if you have adequate engineering understanding of the issues. Desk-top PC's make tedious less of a problem than in pencil, paper, slide rule and mechanical turn the handle calculator days (even after 40 odd years the thought alone makes my wrist ache) so figuring out is feasible. Pity the talking heads feature on the Evans web-site didn't spend some of the production money on proper research instead of opinion natter.

Clive
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Very good Clive.


In fact I searched the web on this matter, an come over some guys testing out the Evans product in some snowmobiles cooling system. As you said, working temperature on the engine rised with Evans cooling, and that wasn`t good at all.

But I also come across these other guys trying out an similiar product - Dpi waterless coolant - developed for norwegian Offshore supply wessels, this product worked much better and was tested by guys doing drift racing wich in some engines had overheat issues after multiple laps, the Dpi was an success in their engines.


So Im realy not ready for switching out my old style coolant just yet:think:


Best regards Brage
 
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