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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Vehicle: 2001 4.6L V8 P38 with engine knock some purchasing.

Engine knock that's on most of the time, but only prevalent when not accelerating. I've heard that it could be a Cam lifter, rods, fuel regulator, oil pump, etc. Best way to go about finding what it is?

Thanks,
Pulaski
 

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Valve lifter and/or big end bearings give the kind of knock what should be easy to recognise..

Fuel regulator or oil pump I never heard to give a knock..
 

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if the knock is low or heavy sounding it could be worn mains and or big end bearings, if its loud and hi (at bonnet) it may be cam and lifters or rocker assemblies , try the old screw driver trick stick it on the motor and put the other end to your ear.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
if the knock is low or heavy sounding it could be worn mains and or big end bearings, if its loud and hi (at bonnet) it may be cam and lifters or rocker assemblies , try the old screw driver trick stick it on the motor and put the other end to your ear.
Thanks! I'll definitely give it a good listening to.
 

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Grab a mechanic's stethoscope, they are $3.75 from Harbor Freight if you are in the US. listen to where the noise is coming from (top or bottom end) and how it changes as the engine heats up and with the RPM change. There are only a couple of ways in which the bottom end noise goes away: either the engine throws a rod or it seizes. Don't rev it too high! If the noise goes away after a while, or at higher RPMs, it's the valve train, most likely lifters. Rover V8 is for the most part a 1950s vintage Buick motor. Antique engines with flat tappets don't like modern eco-friendly engine oils that lack ZDPP anti-wear additive. Lifter and camshaft wear on these engines is much more common today than it was 25 years ago. Use "high mileage" oil or add ZDPP to oil. This will prolong the life of your Rover v8.

If you are swapping lifters, I found US made aftermarket options for Buick 215 to be significantly more durable than genuine Land Rover variant. There are also some poor quality aftermarket options; usually their country of origin is either unknown or labeled incorrectly.
 

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Grab a mechanic's stethoscope, they are $3.75 from Harbor Freight if you are in the US. listen to where the noise is coming from (top or bottom end) and how it changes as the engine heats up and with the RPM change. There are only a couple of ways in which the bottom end noise goes away: either the engine throws a rod or it seizes. Don't rev it too high! If the noise goes away after a while, or at higher RPMs, it's the valve train, most likely lifters. Rover V8 is for the most part a 1950s vintage Buick motor. Antique engines with flat tappets don't like modern eco-friendly engine oils that lack ZDPP anti-wear additive. Lifter and camshaft wear on these engines is much more common today than it was 25 years ago. Use "high mileage" oil or add ZDPP to oil. This will prolong the life of your Rover v8.

If you are swapping lifters, I found US made aftermarket options for Buick 215 to be significantly more durable than genuine Land Rover variant. There are also some poor quality aftermarket options; usually their country of origin is either unknown or labeled incorrectly.
Will do. Thanks.
 
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