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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Emergency Air Suspension Rescue Device (EASRD)

If you ever have a bad compressor, leaking valves, or bad air line connection at the valve block, this little adapter allows you to bypass the problem and continue riding on air. This adapter does not help work around problems with the air spring itself. The adapter is basically a Schrader valve to 1/4" compression adapter, but it must be built from two separate adapters. Most air suspension vehicles use 1/4" OD air line or 6mm OD air line in the case of our Rovers. The 1/4" works out to 6.35mm, which is slightly larger than the Rover's 6mm air line. I could not get the flared insert completely into the 6mm air line by hand. After getting the brass insert started, I heated the brass insert with a lighter for 5-10 seconds and pushed against a hard surface to get it all the way in. This stretched and expanded the last 1/2" of the 6mm air line to the same size as 1/4" air line. The 1/4" compression fitting then had no problem biting down on the air line and forming an air-tight seal. The Schrader valve to 1/8" NPT adapter was about $3 and the 1/8" NPT to 1/4" compression adapter was about $2, so the whole set can be built for around $20. This is far cheaper than other precision machined rescue valve blocks I have seen in the past.

Assembled Rescue Devices

Use teflon plumbing tape to seal the threads between adapters.


Getting 6mm Air Line To Fit 1/4" Compression


Get the brass insert started by hand. Then heat it with a lighter for 5-10 seconds, no more. Grip the cold portion of the air line and push it and the brass insert down on a hard surface. The heated brass insert will expand the 6mm air line to fit and the brass insert can be inserted fully.


Leak Testing


I attached my test air line and EASRD to an air tank with new o-rings. I pumped it up to 50psi and waited 48 hours. It held great and I was unable to detect any leak from pressure drop or soapy water.


Here is a link to my page on this topic.
 

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Re: Emergency Air Suspension Rescue Device (manual air valves)

Somebody else doing it my way!

I have had this for ages, they live in the rear ashtray and can be fitted in 2-3 minutes.

Biggest advantage against most systems is that you can bypass the valve block if its leaking and even cut the pipe and fit near the spring if the pipe is damaged.
Oh yes and you can easily post to somebody else in trouble - ask me how I know???

It is easy enough to get push fit collets to fit the schreader valve though - that makes it easy to switch between the valve block adn emergency if you need to.
 

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2005 Range Rover L322 TD6 HSE. '12 Mazda BT50 GT 3.2lt DC Ute. '13 Volvo XC60. Moto Guzzi 1200 Brev
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Re: Emergency Air Suspension Rescue Device (manual air valves)

I permantly mounted valves to radiator surport. Spliced "T pieces" into air line near valve block. If there was a problem with valve block replaced "T" with straight connectors. Which ever way it was could inflate air bags manually. Have seen others that put a tap in air line to isolate valve block, then no need to change anything. Others went to the extent of fitting ab air pressure gauge for the air tank as well.

Gary
 
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