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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #1
Having done three EAS valve blocks just this week I have noticed 2 major problem areas.
1) Orings within block hard and brittle, cause: age and heat (more so age)
2) Compressor strip down and rebuild all show signs of severe dust ingress, cause: bad filtration of OE filter

first I'll go into comp mod.

Add a totally new filtration system by removing useless OE filter with a inline petrol filter.
How, simply remove OE fiilter, match up a 90 degree fitting where OE filter went in and attach a short length of fuel hose
to just go under Compressor then simply add inline petrol filter, change every service as they cost peanuts.

Another area for concern is the short length of pipe from compressor to valve block, well as air gets compressed it heats
up, this heat is nicely absorbed by the valve block, mainly within the exspensive diaphragm area hence why this pieces of
rubber fail as they do so the solution would be to route piping elswhere of a certain length and then to return back to valve
block, this way the cooled down air wont be as damaging to certain rubbers.

Just a thought and I will certainly be doing it to mine once I get the heads back on and running again (time time time)
Any added tips from yourselves welcome
 

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When I first bought my P38 a bunch of years ago, some dusty crud prevented my diaphragm valve from closing - which eventually killed the compressor. I don't think the heat is that great an issue - more the age like you said. I have read that dust seems to be a prob in dustier climes...
 

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the "dusty crud" is probably degraded air dryer material which plays havoc with solenoids / diaphragm etc.
One solution is to remove the airdryer, unscrew the top and pour the contents into a large kitchen strainer and shake out the fine material. then spread the remaining coarse granules onto an oven tray and leave in a fan forced at 110 degC for about 3 hrs. Turn off oven and leave tray to cool inside oven. This will recharge (dehydrate) the drying material. When you pour the material back into the airdryer, place the filter paper back in top and then also put a disc of filter mesh (like what's used ín the plenum under the windscreen) on top of the paper then the spring goes on top of that to keep it all packed... this reduces the effects mechanical vibration in the airdryer and helps trap the gradual build up of fines which clog the diaphragm and other bits... :thumb:


PS: the thought just occurred to me the you could also tap into the bottom of the engine air intake and draw filtered air from there for the compressor... am wondering why LR didn't do this :think:
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Viper - Your second point I think is very valid. As usual, it is mostly down to poor servicing. I'm going to stick my neck out and ask how many people change filters every 24K or 12k under arduous conditions? I don't even think the majority of dealership service departments would have bothered changing these filters. My short experience with dealership repaired land rovers is eye opening to say the least. Super glue appears to be the only thing they use... :shock:

Dust ingress into this compressor, or any compressor, is going to reduce the service life of the unit dramatically. The filters are expensive for what they are and even hardened perfectionists will struggle to change them.

For most people who take their car to a 'standard' garage, there is no way in hell that this filter will be changed because they are never fully serviced. Then the owner complains that LR's are [email protected] and how they think they are rubbish and they are going Jap next time blah, blah..... Well whose f'in fault is that then? :evil:
 

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Hoges said:
the "dusty crud" is probably degraded air dryer material which plays havoc with solenoids / diaphragm etc.

PS: the thought just occurred to me the you could also tap into the bottom of the engine air intake and draw filtered air from there for the compressor... am wondering why LR didn't do this :think:
Funny I'd suspected that it was internal - didn't think about the drier, tho. I was thinking the powdery stuff inside the bellows when new, dry rotted rubber particles, or similar.

I suspect that LR didn't bother tapping into filtered engine air because it wasn't necessary - the compressors prob came from Thomas with the filters. And aside from the price and in very dusty climes, it doesn't seem to be that much of an issue.
 

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I like the different filter idea, the original filter is definately not up to task, it's designed for relatively clean intake air. The heat's not an issue from the compressor, the valve block gets more heat from the engine than the comp.

The dust is desiccant material, I see it allot. You can put the filter in the air dryer in your pants pocket, then run it through the wash.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #7
All very interesting replies, thanks to you all.

By next week thursday I should have the correct spec of elbow fitting, got suppliers sourcing me a straight screw in
but the thread is course and is stirring a problem as the idea is a simple diy mod and not a complex 'do this do that
then drill this size.....'

When its all done be worth placing a sticker with basic info mentioning filter change, should be a breeze if pipe is of
the right length.

Not happy with LR dealer prices here on diaphragm price, comes in a whooping R817 roughly $100 or 60 pounds for
something that cant cost more than say $5 to make its mad or am I missing something here, have I lost it or is realistic
I think not :shock:
 
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