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Well after two years of owning my P38 I finally think I am on top of the EAS.

Started with four new airbags.

Progressed to new set of "O" rings in the valve block.

Most of wife's dish washing liquid (looking for leaks)

Removed all airbags and re-cleaned and refitted (used rubber grease to ensure they seat and seal properly.

Fitted manual inflation kit (the one with master gauge pressure)

Fitted a "Battery Angel" to stop flat battery

Fitted new piston/seal kit in compressor

Removed and checked fit of "O" rings many times (Little thin ones around solenoid are tricky and require attention to detail to prevent pinching.

Bought another "low mileage" valve block off e-bay. It seems to have the same fault

Really spat the dummy this weekend, after the above 2nd valve block changed nothing.

Took out the four solenoid valves and drilled out the indented black rubber plug seals.

Used a suitable diameter hollow punch and some 4mm rubber sheet, and made four little rubber plugs.

These were pressed into the brass part where the old plugs were, with a match head size amount of silastic to ensure they don't move.

Refitted the entire unit, pre-inflated the airbags, and added 100psi to the main tank using the above manual inflation valves, cleared and unlocked the EAS using the free software and cable from Mr Wilson.

Fired the beasty up.

Beasty no longer drops overnite, Pump no longer runs lots, thing actually behaves.

I'll crow a little more once a week or so has passed with-out having a flat battery.

Cheers for now
Jeff
 

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MoodyBlue933 said:
Took out the four solenoid valves and drilled out the indented black rubber plug seals.

Used a suitable diameter hollow punch and some 4mm rubber sheet, and made four little rubber plugs.

These were pressed into the brass part where the old plugs were, with a match head size amount of silastic to ensure they don't move.
I'd been pondering how to do that, I like your style.
 

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I'll be trying out the solenoid end tips using a length of O ring and cutting into segments then trimming off, will report back how it goes
 

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Hi

MoodyBlue933 said:
These were pressed into the brass part where the old plugs were
I have not seen the brass part you mention, can you upload an image of the brass part?

I have repaired the steel/rubber solenoid shaft though...
from this ...
[attachment=1:59f0xy8b]Worn EAS solenoid tip.jpg[/attachment:59f0xy8b]
to this..
[attachment=0:59f0xy8b]Repaired EAS solenoid tip.jpg[/attachment:59f0xy8b]

.
 

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MoodyBlue933 said:
Well after two years of owning my P38 I finally think I am on top of the EAS.
Removed and checked fit of "O" rings many times (Little thin ones around solenoid are tricky and require attention to detail to prevent pinching.
Jeff

These are buggers, 10x1mm o rings dont work, I've seen new valve blocks leak because of this though I've had luck using a quality silicone sealant between the base and thin top cover, screwed down lightly and let cured over night with a final tightening next morning..

if they made 10x1.25mm o rings problems would be solved but they dont....nowhere
 

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viperover said:
MoodyBlue933 said:
Well after two years of owning my P38 I finally think I am on top of the EAS.
Removed and checked fit of "O" rings many times (Little thin ones around solenoid are tricky and require attention to detail to prevent pinching.
Jeff

These are buggers, 10x1mm o rings dont work, I've seen new valve blocks leak because of this though I've had luck using a quality silicone sealant between the base and thin top cover, screwed down lightly and let cured over night with a final tightening next morning..

if they made 10x1.25mm o rings problems would be solved but they dont....nowhere
The rings in my kit work perfectly, they're special ordered by my oring supplier, they may have them manufactured (not positive, long lead time though..)
 

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viperover said:
if they made 10x1.25mm o rings problems would be solved but they dont....nowhere
When I repaired the valve block on my 94 Classic, I went to a company that specialised in O rings and seals etc. I took the original valve block O rings with me, to obtain replacements. They measured the O rings and supplied excellent replacements. I do not know now if the size was exact or just VERY close, but they did work and my valve block worked fine after its repairs. This is in Western Australia, Perth the state capital city, is the most isolated capital city in the world so if I can get them, you MUST be able to get them somewhere. DENNIS for example :)
 

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Was that Transeals by any chance Peter ? That was the place I used to get the compressor seals made.I now get them from place in the UK that Dennis supplies. :thumb:
 

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allyv8 said:
Was that Transeals by any chance Peter ? That was the place I used to get the compressor seals made.I now get them from place in the UK that Dennis supplies. :thumb:
Yes, that's the place :)
 

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I live in Perth too and generally find it's alot easier to obtain parts from overseas. Dennis is great to deal with offering fast service and good prices. :thumb:

Rob M
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Peter,
Those two are from the front two solenoids I think.

The four that control each bag are brass with rubber inserts.

How did you flatten/replace those two?

Regards

Jeff
96 P38
 

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MoodyBlue933 said:
Peter,
Those two are from the front two solenoids I think.
These are from the valve block of my (previously owned) Classic RR. All of the shafts were the same for all solenoids, like those in the photo.

How did you flatten/replace those two?
I initially contemplated using a knife to slice off a sliver of rubber but realised of course that it would be difficult to keep such a cut as flat and even as needed. The next thought was somehow to try and use my lathe to "face" the end of the rubber tip. To do that would have required a really high speed and a VERY sharp and fine turning tool.

The method that I came up with is relatively simple and can be done with relative ease by almost anyone was to use the drill press!

Mount the solenoid shaft in the chuck of the drill press. Place a flat "block" of some material (I had a small aluminium block to use) under the shaft and place a piece of very fine wet and dry over the block. The block is really only there to enable the operator to hold the wet and dry and to be able to move the w+d as the surface becomes clogged with the removed rubber.

Turn on the dp and gently "dab" the solenoid shaft up and down, pressing it against the w+d. This effectively "sands" the tip smooth and leaving it quite flat. Obviously any out of square settings will induce a slight conical shape on the rubber tip. Keep the w+d wet and move the block frequently to allow "fresh" w+d to "sand" the rubber tip.

Caveats...
Make sure that the dp table is square to the dp quill.
Make sure that the shaft is gripped tight enough to prevent rotation in the chuck, but not too tight that it mars the shaft.

While it would be possible to do this with a hand held drill, I would not recommend it as any angle offset from perpendicular will produce either a conical or angular face on the rubber tip. If this happens the nett result will be air leaks :(

The money you can save by doing this repair could even buy you a drill press :)

FWIW I did the same operation on the valve between the two parts of the valve block.

Maybe I should take some pic's of this method and post it for others to see?
 

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MoodyBlue933 said:
Peter,
The four that control each bag are brass with rubber inserts.Jeff 96 P38
Now THAT prompts a new thought.

Brass as we (probably) all know is non-magnetic, so a BRASS ONLY solenoid will not work. There must be a component of iron/steel within the brass part to enable the solenoid action.

Now the new thought is, that if the part was changed to utilise brass, I wonder if this change came about because of "induced magnetism" within the original steel shaft? Exposure to a magnetic field, particularly a field that fluctuates like that of the solenoid, will induce a magnetic "field" into the exposed part, i.e. the shaft. I know there is a spring to push the shaft down on to the valve, but the thought is something to ponder :)

Other solenoid shafts I have seen, particularly those activated by ac coils (e.g. reticulation valves), have been triangular in cross section. So the shaft was of the correct "diameter" to fit the coil's core, but was less likely to have an induced magnetic field or less likely to magnetically "stick" as most of the steel was further away from the coils field.
 
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