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2002-2005 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings!

My P38 is an '02, and as such, I am unable to tinker with the factory ride height settings using recalibration as described here: http://rangerovers.net/rrupgrades/suspension/hardylift.html
... at least, we tried it, it wouldn't take, and after several emails and phone calls, were told by an RR technician that in '01 and '02 Rangies, the ECU programming is a bit different and will not accept recalibration outside of the expected limits.

I've been thinking about getting a set of Arnott Gen III springs and longer shocks, and would like to take full advantage of the extra 2" of travel they offer, across all ride height settings. I'm running oversized tires, and would like to have the convenience of allowing the EAS system to work as designed, switching from "Highway" to "Normal" automatically, and of course manual "Off Road", but keeping the height 2" higher in each setting, relative to stock. Sounds cool, right?

So, the idea is this: Make modified / custom arms for the EAS sensors that are sufficiently longer than stock to allow the sensor to be in it's "stock" position, but in actuality put the truck approx. 2" higher. I'm thinking I could use adjustable turnbuckles of some kind, that could be tinkered with until the desired range is reached. Making them adjustable would also help make it easier to ensure that the heights were balanced from corner to corner.

Seems like a very simple, inexpensive solution to the problem... so much so that I'm surprised I don't see any mention of it being attempted. I guess if you have a P38 older than '01, reconfiguration of the EAS is easier, so perhaps there's just been no demand.

Has anyone tried this? Thoughts on whether or not it might work?
 

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send a PM to Shupack on here, or contact him here http://www.rover-renovations.com/ in real life he's known as Dennis Altman.
he's already made and i believe has available exactly what your thinking about.
we've done something similar by cutting the arms in half and using old valve rods threaded internally and a lock nut on one end to get the extension.
also having some problems getting the 'brain' to accept a change in heights but i'm sure it's only a case of fiddling a bit more with the extension length and the calibration values.
oh! btw mine is a '98 HSE P38

..................tasi
 

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Yes, I have modified sensor arms in Beta testing now, and they're working well. I'm finishing prototyping a complete lift kit. the GenIII's and longer shocks works well, I've been using 10" travel front, 8" travel rear for about a year now with no issues.

it all depends on how high you want to go, and how much you want to spend. Unfortunately it's not linear.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #4
Dennis, sounds fantastic. Keep me posted. I'm definitely interested. Are you running stock hardware elsewhere, or have you upgraded driveshafts, suspension links, etc. to compensate for the extra height?
 

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Actually, all sorts of methods have been used to lift the air suspension. This guy did pretty much exactly what you're suggesting except that he lengthened only the front and lowered the entire rear sensors: http://www.rangerovers.net/rrupgrades/airlifts.html

Both Dennis and Storey have lengthened rear linkages available - not for the lift, tho, just for the extended range needed w/a lift.

A lot of the LR3 guys use modified linkages to raise their cars. I think you're right in that the reason not more people modify their linkages is because its not necessary. Are you sure that this is the case w/ your EAS ECU? Seems wacky that LR would change the ECU at the very end of a model run. How bout swapping in an earlier ECU? They're available for relatively cheap on the bay.

Edit: Dooh - too slow in posting. Got beaten to it.

Just to answer your last question (without knowing exactly what Dennis has done to his car): one of the good things about modifying the EAS is that you can go back to normal-like heights for on-road which eliminates the need for a lot of expensive changes to driveshafts, radius arms, etc. as you don't have probs w/vibrations, caster/alignment, etc. at off-road speeds.

Good luck with your BeCM... :pray:
 

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I'm pretty sure that the 01-02 models have the same limits as the earlier ones. Have you found the table of acceptable ranges on the forum here? If you go outside the range, it will fault as soon as you turn on the truck after calibrating and give the fault "Target height incorrect" or something, and then stick a default value in the corner that is wrong, or sometimes write over all your settings. Pain in the ass.

I've recalibrated mine to be higher, and have Dennis's sensor extenders which allow the sensors to not break during full articulation/wheel hang.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #7
Jsmooth65 said:
Have you found the table of acceptable ranges on the forum here?
All I found was this page: http://www.rangerovers.net/rrupgrades/s ... ylift.html

Where it provides these specs:
Freeway - default
Standard - 15mm higher (room for Cooper ST 255/70 x 16 tyres)
High - 30mm higher, the full whack - emulates emergency extended setting.
Extended - default

Is there something I'm missing?

If you go outside the range, it will fault as soon as you turn on the truck after calibrating and give the fault "Target height incorrect" or something, and then stick a default value in the corner that is wrong, or sometimes write over all your settings.
This is exactly the experience we had when attempting to recalibrate... If someone could please point me in the right direction for acceptable ranges for the various height settings, I can definitely give it another whack.

I've recalibrated mine to be higher, and have Dennis's sensor extenders which allow the sensors to not break during full articulation/wheel hang.
Good call. I'd still like to try using sensor extenders so I can be up higher across the full range, accommodating the oversize tires at highway mode as well.

Dennis, if you're looking for another test subject for your sensor extenders, I'm game! :thumb:
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #8
Stevemfr said:
Just to answer your last question (without knowing exactly what Dennis has done to his car): one of the good things about modifying the EAS is that you can go back to normal-like heights for on-road which eliminates the need for a lot of expensive changes to driveshafts, radius arms, etc. as you don't have probs w/vibrations, caster/alignment, etc. at off-road speeds.
Exactly. Plus, much more peace of mind at highway speeds due to the lower center of gravity.
 

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currently, my lifted highway height is between original highway and city heights, I leave it in highway most of the time, except rough roads where the bumpstops hit quite often BUT I'm not done with the changes. No worries of drive-line vibes (yet) because I run within the original angles. only 31" tires so far..
 

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Code:
P38A height measurements & expected sensor values

Mode          Height      Front values       Rear values
--------------------------------------------------------
Access        73cm        50-110             50-100
Low           77cm        75-140             75-120
Standard      79cm        95-150             85-130
High          83cm        120-180            105-150
extended      85cm

Height = floor to top wheel arch
 
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