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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all!

I''ve just rebuilt my valve block and compressor (seal and liner) and used vaseline in the 3 o-rings for the Non-Return Valves. I've just read in the sticky that these should be fitted dry.
Since my compressor is (almost) always running and that being linked to NRVs, could the vaseline be affecting their operation ? If yes, is this something that will pass with time (the vaseline clearing away) or should I remove the VB and clean it up ? :pray:

Thanks :)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
EAS - Non Return Valves

So, I opened the valve block and removed the 3 NRVs. They "seem" OK with just a slight wear on the bottom of tip, just above the o-ring.
I cleaned it up (because of the Vaseline) and replaced the valves in another other, just in case.
I eventually got the EAS to wake up again (another problem) but now it is constantly leaking from the silencer!
How can I check if my NRVs are busted ? They seem fine in a visual inspection :(

Just thinking about removing the valve block for the 4th time is making me very depressed :crybaby2:
 

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Vaseline isn't that bad for your Valve Block... it is the EAS Pump that is going to suffer from any lubrication... The EAS Pump SEAL is (mainly) made of Teflon and Teflon is a self-lubricating product.

When Vaseline of WD40 (or any other lubrication) touches the Teflon, your Pump / Compressor will loose power.

Regards,
Goswin
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Hi

When there is leaking from the silencer when the compressor runs, this is a sign that the diaphram valve that is leaking. If it leaks from the silencer even when the compressor is not running, you might have inserted your non return valves in the wrong direction (up side down).

The problem with vasaline on the NRV o/rings can be that dust and dirt sticks to the vasaline and prevents proper closing of the NRValves.

Best regards

Jos
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Been there, fought that.

My NRV1 (reservoir tank check) was worn on the tip and wasn't seating properly, causing constant compressor running and blowby at the silencer. NRV2 and 3 are probably in perfect condition so just swap one of them with NRV1. The condition of the other two are not critical to the operation of the system. Shupack solved this one for me. :thumb:
 

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Lube on O rings is not a issue, on the NRVS they were original sprayed with zinc lube which is related to heat, the zinc helps lubricate the O rings into correct seating position.

One area I avoid applying lube is where the NRVs are housed as there is no retaining lip to keep the four O rings from slightly dislodging.

Regardless of condition I always replace the diaphragm as procedure but I have noticed on a few Blocks that even after replacing the diaphragm it can still leak out the exhauust.

The remedy here is to lightly strect the spring thats located where the diaphragm goes, rare but it does happen where the spring gets a tad bit too weak
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the replies :)

I can't find any information on how to identify NRV1, 2 and 3 on the block itself. I understand the flow diagram in Rave without problems but then there is no connection between it and the physical block itself :(
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Photos

I took the Valve Block out again and rotated all the non return valves. This resulted in absolutely nothing, except for 3 hours of wasted time :(
There's no air coming out of the silencer port when the compressor is active and it only discharges when the compressor is off. So, everything indicates a bad NRV1.

I tried figuring out which ports in the block belong to which valves, can someone please verify my findings or correct me ?


Also, here's a picture of my 3 NRVs, they are showing some wear but seem OK (to me):
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Sorry to hear switching the valves didn't work. :think: Before I switched mine the compressor would pump up OK, but when it shut off there would be a loud pop and air would start seeping out the silencer port. Your valves do look a lot better than mine did, but only my one NRV1 was worn, the other two were in almost new condition. Port labelled #1 is the compressor valve NRV1 port. That particular valve is placed in facing reverse of the other two.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm also finding some grey deposit around the valves' o-rings, which I'm guessing must be desiccant.
Is it possible that this fine product is preventing the valve from shutting perfectly? I can replace the desiccant but then what's the recommend way to purge the system?

Thanks for all the help so far :)
 

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desiccant is tan, the grey is likely wear from the NRV tips. when the compressor stops you get a puff of air, then should be nothing. if it seeps, the NRV is leaking. If it leaks slowly while the compressor runs, the diaphragm is leaking (as stated above).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi Shupack,

Well, then I'm out of ideas :crybaby2: . I've disassembled the block 5 times now, the valves seem OK, there's no wear, they are correctly fitted and they still leak...
Only thing I can remember is trying the old o-rings again, just in case these are not a correct fit, but I really could use some fresh ideas here, because this must be something really obvious that is escaping me :cry:
 

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it could be the actual tank isolation valve, I like to swap the plungers from the inlet (2nd from front) and the exhaust (front).

The holes in the bottom plastic of the valve body are different size, so they have to stay the same, but you can swap the inside part that moves. The one with 4.0 is the exhaust, stays in the front position, the 2.5 is the tank isolation, 2nd position.
 

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Quick question (not to hi-jack the thread)...

Shupack, any luck yet getting a source for or manufacturing new check valves?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
shupack said:
it could be the actual tank isolation valve, I like to swap the plungers from the inlet (2nd from front) and the exhaust (front).
I had a hard time understanding what "plungers" are :oops: You mean the metallic part inside the solenoids, right ?
So, if I got this right, you're suggesting that I disassemble the inlet and exhaust solenoids and to exchange the plungers between them. That's a job that I can do without removing the block :dance: :dance:


Looking at the diagram in RAVE, if both the inlet (7) and the exhaust (8) solenoids are leaking it would show the same symptoms as a leaking NRV1.
 

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shupack said:
rtkraken said:
Quick question (not to hi-jack the thread)...

Shupack, any luck yet getting a source for or manufacturing new check valves?
negative, unless I order 10,000.....
****...

I've got an extra block now. Time for some experimentation... :think:
 

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mcapinha said:
shupack said:
it could be the actual tank isolation valve, I like to swap the plungers from the inlet (2nd from front) and the exhaust (front).
I had a hard time understanding what "plungers" are :oops: You mean the metallic part inside the solenoids, right ?
So, if I got this right, you're suggesting that I disassemble the inlet and exhaust solenoids and to exchange the plungers between them. That's a job that I can do without removing the block :dance: :dance:


Looking at the diagram in RAVE, if both the inlet (7) and the exhaust (8) solenoids are leaking it would show the same symptoms as a leaking NRV1.
Yes, you understand correctly. Let us know how that turns out.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The inlet (7) exhaust (8) and corner (10) valves work in conjunction to raise/lower each corner.
The three non-return valves (NR-1,2,3) make sure the air goes the right way because the solenoid
valves only hold air one way
. ie the corner valves (10) hold air in the air springs, the inlet valve (7)
holds air in the tank, and the exhaust valve helps hold air in the springs. If you get a higher pressure
on the other side of one of these valves somehow, the air would leak right through, like a non-return
valve.
in Rover Renovations Knowledge Base

I hadn't realised that the solenoids only hold air in one direction, so I thought that for the air to flow throught the inlet and exhaust solenoids, both had to be open/energised. I now understand that if the inlet solenoid is leaking than the air will flow through the exhaust without resistance.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
What I wrote in my previous post makes little sense: if the solenoids only worked in one direction, when the inlet (7) is open air would flow through the exhaust (8)...


What would happen if i fitted the base of the solenoids in the wrong way? Looking at this picture from paulp38a's site, I'm remembering that I didn't pay particular attention to this detail although as a matter of principle i always try to fit everything back the exact way it came out.


Looking at a picture from the bottom of the solenoid and at the block itself, I'm thinking there's no problem in fitting the base either way (rotated 180º degrees around the plunger) ?

 
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