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LEGACY VENDOR
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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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1,113 Posts
First thought... no level control with only pressure input. Say a few folk get in the back seat, there's no input to add the air needed to offset the additional weight. If anything, the vehicle would let air out to keep the pressure at setpoint, causing a serious droop in the suspension?
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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9,242 Posts
Here is the best for the P38 if an aftermarket system is needed IMHO.
http://www.dakotadigital.com/index.cfm/ ... prd501.htm
I actually bought it all, but then got to grips with the RR EAS system (not that the SOB didnt put the missus on the bump stops last weekend though...)
I had the DHC2100 and it looked like quality stuff. The display will fit in the small cup holder place that is above the HVAC.

Martin
 

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269 Posts
You have finally stepped into my realm of expertise...I have built a few minitrucks with airbag suspensions and i know the answers. To start, ABSOLUTELY do not using anything from Airbagit...they have the worst reputation in the business. Ok, now past that.

First of all, you will need to find a way to convert the pressure sensor signal over to a signal the range rover computer can accept. This unto itself can be complicated. Secondly, its not a bad idea, however, the weight of anything will increase the pressure. Therefore, if your system is set to maintain the same pressure across the board, any weight on a corner will make that corner lower, not only because you are weighing on it, but the computer will drop the pressure to maintain, creating a never-ending, painful cycle. The height sensors work because different pressures can be used to create certain heights. Then, lets say you set up each corner for a different value, but if you put more gas than you planned on, or more passengers, or a different driver, or tow a trailer, you are up the creek...

Point being, pressure sensors would be much more problem than they are worth, considering how you would have to plumb them into the system and calibrate (what we are trying to avoid in the first place) the WHOLE system, not just heights. It seems great, and you have the basics within the Range Rover system, but it is just not even close to feasible.

Realistically, to do it right, you need to remove the Range Rover system or bypass it and put in your own system, from top to bottom, including valves, ride control, sensors, gauges, etc., possibly using the factory lines and bags. An interesting thought would be to have a manual control option to lift when wanted or lower it for that boulevard crawl.
 

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LEGACY VENDOR
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2,492 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
NikeCheck246 said:
You have finally stepped into my realm of expertise...I have built a few minitrucks with airbag suspensions and i know the answers. To start, ABSOLUTELY do not using anything from Airbagit...they have the worst reputation in the business. Ok, now past that.

First of all, you will need to find a way to convert the pressure sensor signal over to a signal the range rover computer can accept. This unto itself can be complicated. Secondly, its not a bad idea, however, the weight of anything will increase the pressure. Therefore, if your system is set to maintain the same pressure across the board, any weight on a corner will make that corner lower, not only because you are weighing on it, but the computer will drop the pressure to maintain, creating a never-ending, painful cycle. The height sensors work because different pressures can be used to create certain heights. Then, lets say you set up each corner for a different value, but if you put more gas than you planned on, or more passengers, or a different driver, or tow a trailer, you are up the creek...

Point being, pressure sensors would be much more problem than they are worth, considering how you would have to plumb them into the system and calibrate (what we are trying to avoid in the first place) the WHOLE system, not just heights. It seems great, and you have the basics within the Range Rover system, but it is just not even close to feasible.

Realistically, to do it right, you need to remove the Range Rover system or bypass it and put in your own system, from top to bottom, including valves, ride control, sensors, gauges, etc., possibly using the factory lines and bags. An interesting thought would be to have a manual control option to lift when wanted or lower it for that boulevard crawl.
Thanks for that great imput.
I thought about using my Gen3 airsprings, my OEM valve block or another custom one, my DC5000 compressor and that's it.

You're absolutely right about the variation of weight problem. That could be a nightmare but i wonder if a difference of 50 lb is really a problem. After all i've been running on a MARS kit that works with pressure only too for months without that much issue.

What i'd really like is a system that is fully controllable. I'd like to be able to :

-deflate a side on the trail
-correct the level of the car for a roof tent leveling
-deflate all the bags to crawl for some parking access
-do not worry about exploding a height sensor on the trail
-lower the body more than highway setting (i've done it many times with MARS kit or lift box and reversed polarity and it is GREAT) for stability at high speed but on quality highways only.
 

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All of those things can be done with a manually controlled system...it would be much easier with a RidePro system or Dakota Digital, and it is more than possible. The biggest problem is going to be a need to integrate with the factory becm or bypass it altogether. You also have to remember, with a difference in pressure, comes a difference in spring rates, which can make for a rolling motion going down the road.

However, the benefits are obvious. For example, you can drop a corner when articulating to pick up traction, or lower it for that "cruising" look.
 
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