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Discussion Starter #1
EAS problem… a very vexing one, too.

2002 Range Rover HSE (P38). I have owned the vehicle for about 3 years and have periodically experienced suspension leak-downs that tended to be related to cold weather. When I first got the vehicle there was a serious leak-down in the right-front spring which was remedied when I changed the o-rings on the spring, other than the cold-weather leak-downs things were pretty much ok.

I should add that I am very comfortable working on pretty much any part of a car having been an ASE Certified mechanic about 25+ years ago, I know that technology has changed dramatically but try to keep up with it as best I can when working on our own vehicles.

About six months ago the two back springs would leak down identically, and I do mean at exactly the same rate. Believing this to be a problem that was not directly related to the springs or airlines but instead to a control I rebuilt the EAS valve block completely (every o-ring) and gave it a thorough but gentle cleaning when completely disassembled. I also changed every o-ring on the vehicle... every spring, the tank, and changed the desiccant in the dryer and the o-rings top and bottom, nothing improved, still the two rear springs leaked down.

Wondering if the rear springs had small but identical pinhole leaks I changed both rear springs, still no improvement. Last week I finished a drive, got home and heard a hissing from the right front, and feeling that finally this thing has presented a clear problem (not necessarily a logical one) I replaced both front springs, still the problem remains.

Wondering if a calibration was the answer I have made some calibration blocks and calibrated the vehicle both with the blocks between the frame and axel and by measuring from the ground through the center cap to the fender, still a leak-down, but, interestingly the leak-down seems to leak-down more quickly when calibrated with the blocks than the ground-to-fender measurement, and the right front was now included in the leak-down, so, after a few hours only the left-front will remain at its proper height, and I do mean exactly where it is supposed to be.

Feeling that this rear problem must be an airline leak somewhere in a long-straight section of the lines (inside the protective heat wrap), yesterday my very patient wife and I changed every airline in the vehicle… to the tank, to each wheel, and to and from the dryer. I went so far as to remove the rear-springs, “plug” the new airline into the springs to convince myself that the connections were 100% good and fully seated and then fed the line up through the frame and then along to the engine compartment. I got up this morning and, the rear had leaked down, and to a lesser degree the right front. I will now change my terminology from “leak-down” to what I now believe is possibly a controlled but confused lowering of the vehicle by the vehicle.

I have leak-tested the valve block, and using the calibration software and a correct connection from a laptop to the OBDII connection looked for faults (none) and as I mentioned before made various calibrations with the blocks and fender to ground measurements. I have noticed a different value of approximately +10 on the left front wheel sensor when doing the calibration. For example, if the left front sensor value were 137 the right front would be 127 with the rear sensors in closer agreement, for example 118 and 120. From what I have read on these sites as long as you don’t have a value of 0 or 255 from a sensor then most likely (within reason) the sensor is good and should be calibrated to whatever values are present with a block present to equalize the distance between the axle and frame for a calibration with blocks.

So, here I am… confounded, with a few more ideas but more of an interest to hear some of your ideas first, and of course to hear from anyone who has had a similar problem that they overcame, I think that vanquished might be a better word.

Looking forward to your ideas... great site.

Thanks, all the best, Steve
 

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remove the delay relay overnight, this will eliminate and self-leveling and narrow the problem down between actual leaks and an electrical "feature" of the sytem. since you've re-done everything, I'd put odds on the "feature".
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Do what Dennis has suggested, and also check (in this state) air escaping from the exhaust port. I have had a few do this and by reconditioning the inlet and exhaust soleniod plunger surfaces stopped the air loss completely. Have a read of my thread on this subject.

Regards Russell.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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HSE said:
Do what Dennis has suggested, and also check (in this state) air escaping from the exhaust port. I have had a few do this and by reconditioning the inlet and exhaust soleniod plunger surfaces stopped the air loss completely. Have a read of my thread on this subject.

Regards Russell.
I can second that, just had the same problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thak you all, I will post my results.

All the best, Steve
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Hey Shupack...are you thinking non-return valve like I am? If the electrical portion isn't the culprit anyway.
 

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yep, NRV, along with a leaky isolation valve, Russell's fix. If the tank isolation seals fine, the NRV's can leak all they want and not cause a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hello Everyone.

I removed the timer-relay overnight and the rear of the truck leaked all the way down, the right front had a partial leak-down which both front-right and rear is identical to the leak-down condition with the timer-relay in. Since I have replaced all of the air-springs and the lines and I am 100% confident in all of the connections it seems as though the valve-block is the culprit. The leak-down became evident within just a few hours as it is with the timer installed.

Shupac mentioned "If the tank isolation seals fine, the NRV's can leak all they want and not cause a problem". I am not yet completely familiar with those valves except to say that there is no leakage at all from the tank. After an overnight leak-down of the springs when I start the vehicle it will rise to, for example, "High Profile" within just a few seconds, I would say less than three seconds if I were to time it (I rebuilt the compressor a few weeks ago, piston seal, cylinder, and o-rings) so I am confident that whatever valve or system in the valve-block that is holding the tank charge is doing the job... does this refine the diagnosis at all?

All the best, Steve
 
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