Range Rovers Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been in a hard fault for about a week. My strategy is to get the Rover to the correct height and then disconnect the delay timer. I don't have any leaks, so this should relieve me of some headaches. I am trying to perfect the ride height. The front is currently a bit too high and I want to lower it a bit. When I went to operate the Rover with the pigtail, nothing happened. There is plenty of air in the system. However, I cannot operate anything at the moment. It won't go up or down and I cannot get the compressor to work. I do not hear any clicks when I operate valves. Any thoughts?
 

·
RIP Our Friend
Joined
·
27,834 Posts
If you follow the field recovery directions on the home pages it works. If it is not working then you are doing something wrong or not giving us enough info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
About 5 days ago, my EAS went into a fault while I was driving on the highway. Previously, I had to bypass my high temperature cut-off switch because my compressor would never come on by itself. My jumper wire had come loose and I am imagining I had a fault because I lost pressure somehow. I do not have leaks, though. Also, I had the EAS locked so it would raise and lower. I did this as a precautionary measure and to minimize the usage of my compressor which I rebuilt about 20K miles ago.

So, on Monday, I used the pigtails to bring the Rover up to normal ride height. After a few attempts of doing this, starting the Rover, and having it move itself back down, I decided to get it back up to a drivable height using the pigtails and then disconnecting the delay timer. This has worked very well. The entire week, the Rover stayed where it was and didn't move at all. The problem has been that I didn't really time it very well when I pulled the delay timer and the Rover has not been even. The right side was a little higher than the left.

Therefore, this morning, I went out to get the Rover to an even height. I had to put the delay timer back in but was able to get the Rover to adjust. I accidentally made the left side higher than the right, this time.

Since this point, I have been unable to get any response out of the EAS using the pigtails. I try to jump pins 1, 9, and 10 to get the front left spring down a bit. However, I am getting no response. I can't get the compressor to run. I can't get valves to click. I have the key in the ignition, I have the delay timer in, I am getting no response. I even drove it around for about 10 minutes between 0 and 55 mph with the delay timer in and everything connected, and the EAS didn't do anything.

I no longer see the "EAS Fault" message. Come to think of it, I don't think I have seen that since Monday. However, I do see the "Slow 35 MPH" message.

Incidentally, I am waiting on some parts to make my OBDII>Serial port cord so I can reset the EAS and hopefully clear the fault. There really isn't anything wrong with the system except for a worn NRV which causes the front end to rise when the compressor runs.

Is it possible for the EAS to just shut down?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
I try to jump pins 1, 9, and 10 to get the front left spring down a bit
You may want to check with a multimetre (or at worst, with a bulb) whether there's indeed +12 at #1. I understand there would not be if e.g. the delay timer does not sit properly in its plug. If there is, you may also try the multiplug in valve/compressor block (C152 in the pre-99 description, C0871 for your '02, same pinout), just to check whether the wiring is all right. Far as the system is powered and the valves are not toast, lowering should work any time.

Not that there weren't weird things. Myself a couple of weeks ago, I needed to raise the car with busted RL spring. I jumpered at the valve block multiplug; both the front springs worked like a charm, whilst the RR one did not move at all -- regardless I did hear the valve click. There's no fault at the RR side: as soon as I did fix the RL side (after limping to garages with rear on bump stops, ick), it began working without a glitch and without being touched. Gremlins.

(edit) P.S. Never heard of EAS ecu shutting down, but even if it did, the jumpers should work all right. You may try to disconnect the ECU completely and jumper at the plug: never tried myself, but based on others' experience, should work all right too.
 

·
RIP Our Friend
Joined
·
27,834 Posts
You may try to disconnect the ECU completely and jumper at the plug: never tried myself, but based on others' experience, should work all right too.
That's what field recovery is for. The ECU should be disconnected when attempting any manual jumper process. Leaving the ECU connected would send mixed signals to the driver pack.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
you have to have 12v (battery voltage) at/from the timer/relay, i.e that component has to be working properly for 'field recovery' or any 'jumping' at the EAS ecu connector to work (yes..with it disconnected).

This is only activated on ignition II (other than self powering periodically). That timer/relay also powers the valve block driver pack and consequently the solenoids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah, I'm stumped. Nothing is working on the EAS now. I suppose I'll just have to wait and see if resetting the EAS system works. I have a 30 mile drive coming up today. We'll see if it comes back on during that drive. I have everything plugged in properly to include the EAS, delay timer, and high-temp cut-off switch grounded.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
re-setting the EAS (clearing any fault's) will have no impact on field recovery method, your missing something...basic, i'm guessing.
 

·
RIP Our Friend
Joined
·
27,834 Posts
It's got to be something really obvious. Sadly I am just now getting to my coffee and my mind is just not catching why manual operation is not working for you. The only, and extremely rare, option I can think of would be a complete failure of the driver pack. I say extremely rare because I have never heard of one completely failing. THis of course assuming you have checked for duff wiring already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When do a voltage test from pin 1 to pins 7 and 25, I get readings of 10V. However, I get negligible readings between pin 1 and all other pins. I suppose this just means that I have messages being sent to the BECM.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Nope...you've lost me, what are trying to do? do you have 12 volts (it will actually be your battery voltage, whatever that maybe) on pin 1 when measured to a good ground either on the body or pin 18?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I just tested the voltage from pin 1 to my tire with the key in ignition position II and got a reading of negligible voltage.
 

·
RIP Our Friend
Joined
·
27,834 Posts
To your TIRE? Huh? First off your tire is rubber and would not provide a ground of any kind. Secondly why on earth are you running a line to your tire when the seat frame, bolts, hinges etc are all right there to provide ground. I can't help but think we are on completely different wave lengths as to what you are trying to do and where you are jumpering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I assent to the fact that it was incorrect thinking on my part. I went for an insulator instead of a ground. Thanks for the suggestions for better grounds. I am clearly and admittedly not an electrical engineer or an electrician.

I jumped from pin 1 to the torx bolt head of the driver's seat and had a reading of 0 volts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Note that, when jumping the high temp cut-off switch for the compressor to ground, you cannot manually operate the EAS without blowing fuse 29.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Field recovery [or any 'jumping' at the EAS ecu] by-passes the overheat switch (it's just a signal for the EAS ecu, which is disconnected at that time) you don't need to worry about that to get the compressor to run.

To test the overheat switch you need the continuity function on the voltmeter, as its a switch to ground then of course if you send 12v down it then it's (a short circuit) like bridging across a battery terminal.

The fact that it did blow a fuse (luckily) shows that the overheat switch was ok (assuming it wasn't actual too hot and should have been open). In that case [switch open] the fuse wouldn't have blown because there was no path to ground. With the EAS ecu attached then it would interpret this as an overheat and stop the compressor.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top