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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know where to find the definitive list of what the brief description given in the fault code description actually means? EG "RR valve stuck closed" --what is an RR valve (and where do I find it?)
 

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Fault codes are self explanatory. I would suggest taking time to learn about the EAS system where the components are located and what they do. The RAVE workshop manual has an excellent description of operation with chart of where parts are located.

RR Valve stuck closed means the valve for the Right Rear bag is stuck closed. All valves are located on the valve block located under the hood in the big EAS black box with the compressor. Chances are replacing the orings in the valve block will rectify the issue. There is a detailed "How To" sticky at the top of this forum.
 

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These are solenoid valves that take input from the driver block reacting to the height sensors readings. They open and close to achieve the desired suspension level. You can check each valves operation by manually jumping each at the EAS ECU under the front seat. You can hear the valves actuate. You can also swap valve left to right and see if the code moves. If it doesn't move when swapped, it indicates wonky height sensor or bad driver block. In my experience, it was a dead driver block.
 

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Or a leak. If the ECU tells the Right Rear to rise and it doesn't within a specified time, it assumes the valve didn't open. In reality it could just as easily mean that the valve did open but the air all fell out of the perished air spring. If you are reading codes then chances are you have diagnostics, if you are using the free RSW EASUnlock software, try reading the information about it at http://www.rswsolutions.com/index.php/p38a-eas-faults
 

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Almost every EAS fault code is due to leaks. The EAS usually reports based on when it gets unexpected results. Consequently "stuck open" or "stuck closed" is usually when the commanded action doesn't happen, but non-responding valves can sometimes be actually that !!
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #7
I have now replaced all four suspension units, all "O" rings, overhauled the compressor and the solenoid block, replaced the desiccant in the air dryer, and checked (many times) for any apparent leaks (none found now). The vehicle suspension works fine when driving it, and whilst the engine is on - it rises to the highest setting, drops to the low setting and rides happily at the "normal" setting. However, when I switch off the ignition, and park up, the suspension will drop to the stops. Sometimes it does this in a very controlled and quick manner, with the solenoids operating on and off. At other times, it will take three or four days. I have now put two valves on the front air supply, and shut them prior to switching off the engine. The suspension stayed up, with absolutely no drop at all, over a period of days. Does this mean I still have some sort of problem with the solenoid block?
 

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If you are parked on rough ground, it will do that. It drops the 3 highest corners down to the same height as the lowest. Sometimes, as the 3 drop it causes the lowest to drop further so it keeps on going. If parked on a level surface, it shouldn't do it.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #10
That sounds really strange - if the vehicle is not parked on dead level ground, it is going to settle down to the stops every time it is parked? I don't particularly wish to have to wait for it to pressure back up every time I want to use it - maybe I'll need to put in solenoid operated shutoff valves which will lock in the pressure as soon as I switch off the ignition. Has anyone done this, or is this just not the right way to sort the problem? What I do know is that I cannot live with it like this.
 

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It doesn't have to be dead level but reasonably level and it will stay where it is. Unless, the stored heights in the ECU are way out of limits. Have you replaced any of the height sensors? Have you calibrated the system? Even if it does drop to the bumpstops, unless you have a leak so it is losing pressure while parked overnight, it will rise up to normal as soon as you start the engine. Mine takes less time than it takes to put my seatbelt on. If you are having to wait for it, then it is losing pressure from the reservoir which could be down to a leak from the valve block. Especially as it has recently been apart. Was it doing this before you replaced the valve block O rings?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #12
I have not done anything with any of the height sensors, and the stored heights look reasonable (using RSW Software to check). It does not take any time at all to rise to the right height in the morning - maybe a couple of minutes, so I don't think the reservoir is depressurising overnight, but I'm just frustrated that I cannot get it to remain at the correct height overnight. Before I replaced the (new) orange "O" rings in the solenoid block with the black viton ones, it was dropping fairly fast at the front, but now the front seems to stay up quite a bit longer than the rear! I saw a suggestion to replace the EAS timer, under the front seat, with a 4-pin relay, but am not sure if I should do that or not. Presumably the timer has some purpose in life, which obviously would not be achieved if it was removed - this may not be a good thing?
 

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The timer relay enables the EAS every 6 hours or so. When enabled it looks at the heights of each corner and lowers 3 of them down to the same as the lowest one. If you are parked on a level surface and have no leaks, that means it will just stay where it is but if you have a slight leak on one corner then that one will be lower so the others will drop to match it. If you put a 4 pin relay in instead of the timer relay, the EAS system is only powered up when the ignition is on. In that case, if you have no leaks, it should stay at the same height indefinitely but in reality will probably drop an inch or so a week. You also need to be aware that with a 4 pin relay in place of the timer, you will not be able to connect to diagnostics so you will need to put the timer back in to use the RSW software. If it takes a couple of minutes to rise after having been left, then you are losing pressure from the reservoir otherwise it would rise up immediately the engine is started.

Swap the timer relay with a 4 pin, measure the height of each corner, leave the car and before starting it again, measure to see which corner has dropped as you do have a leak, maybe only slight, somewhere. When you rebuilt the valve block did you trim the ends of the pipes and chamfer them with a pencil sharpener? If you didn't then you almost certainly have a slight leak where the pipes go into the valve block.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #14
I have not got round to removing the timer relay yet, but have had a go at calibrating the settings. I managed to load in my settings for "High" and "Normal" heights, but I cannot get the "EAS Unlock" software to load in any settings for either the "Access" position, or the "Highway" positions. Does anyone know if there are any range limits for the values which can be entered into them (My readings when the blocks were in the suspension were 110, 91, 103, 94 for "Highway", and 83, 63, 80, 74 for "Access")
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for that info (Where did you find the "EAS System Info Document" you refer to?). Have you used Wilson Story'e EAS unlock software at all? I still cannot get it to accept my input for the Low & Access heights.
 

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Sometimes the ECU does not like it if the existing settings overlap. Try setting Access to 50-50-50-50, and then calibrate Motorway (low profile) height so it's approx 1 inch below standard. If your Normal height is too low, this can interfere with setting low-profile.

I have no problems with either Nanocom or EAS Unlock connection to the ECU.

EAS SID can be found at these two links. I never managed to upload it on here, because the PDF exceeds site limits.

Landyzone Technical Archive

P38A Website (Japanese website)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks - I'll give that a go, once I fit the new bumpstops (as the old ones are in varying degrees of disrepair, they will settle at an uneven height just now, so the calibration will not be true).
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for all the info from all. The car now sits level, and does not drop at all overnight. It moves up and down as it should, using the height selector (and rises and falls automatically on the "Motorway" setting) so I feel like I've won the Lottery! Now to fix all the other less essential stuff!!
 
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